Norwegian Tour: Tuesday 03rd of January to Sunday 15th January 2017.

Lynnette, Snorre and I had just returned from Leeuwenboschfontein so everything was a bit rushed but finally the big day had arrived; Anton Camilla, Viljé, Birk and Anton’s in-laws were finally due to arrive. We had been looking forward to this visit for a long time and it felt as if they took ages to eventually appear in the arrival hall at Cape Town International. When they eventually did arrive there was so much excitement that nobody took any photographs!  Anyway, we got them to the Kolping Guest House in Durbanville safely after making a detour to our place first because the visitors wanted to see where we lived. We let them take it easy for the rest of the day and on Wednesday we went over the tour itinerary for the rest of their stay.

Thursday the 05th of January we set off bright and early for our 08:30 appointment at Sadie Family Wines in the Aprilskloof on the north-western slopes of the Paardeberg. The winery is situated in the Swartland region and the closest town is Malmesbury. Access to the venue is via unsurfaced roads, which the Vito does not like. We were met by Christine who handed us over to Paul for a most instructive tour of the cellar followed by a well-presented wine tasting. Eden Sadie, the driving force behind Sadie Wines is considered by many to be the enfant terrible of the new generation of Swartland wine architects. He was previously the winemaker during the development of the Spice Route wines at Fairview. His return to grass roots winemaking and the extensive, almost exclusive use of decades old, previously neglected bush vine vineyards to make exceptional wines has caused quite a stir. Most of these vineyards are a long way from the winery too and some are also ungrafted vines which is very unusual considering the fact that grafting pulled the South African wine industry back from the brink of total collapse during the Phylloxera in the late 19th century.

TOP LEFT: The start of the tour and we are all gathered in the shade of a convenient tree to listen to Paul. TOP CENTRE: The oldest building on the property, where it all started. TOP RIGHT: Huge earthenware vats, reminiscent of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves. CENTRE: The Sadie company logo. BOTTOM LEFT: The delightfully cool maturation cellar. BOTTOM CENTRE: We invade the maturation cellar in search of knowledge and lower temperatures. BOTTOM RIGHT: The group enjoys the lower temperature in the cellar because outside it would hit the low 40’s later in the day.
TOP LEFT: The start of the tour and we are all gathered in the shade of a convenient tree to listen to Paul. TOP CENTRE: The oldest building on the property, where it all started. TOP RIGHT: Huge earthenware vats, reminiscent of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves. CENTRE: The Sadie company logo. BOTTOM LEFT: The delightfully cool maturation cellar. BOTTOM CENTRE: We invade the maturation cellar in search of knowledge and lower temperatures. BOTTOM RIGHT: The group enjoys the lower temperature in the cellar because outside it would hit the low 40’s later in the day.
TOP LEFT: Tasting in progress. TOP RIGHT: Tasting requires concentration especially for wines of this high quality. CENTRE: The range of Old Vineyard wines; really something very special. BOTTOM LEFT: The Columella is in a class of its own. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mev Kirsten might be from octogenarian bush vines but she outdoes the younger competitors
TOP LEFT: Tasting in progress. TOP RIGHT: Tasting requires concentration especially for wines of this high quality. CENTRE: The range of Old Vineyard wines; really something very special. BOTTOM LEFT: The Columella is in a class of its own. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mev Kirsten might be from octogenarian bush vines but she outdoes the younger competition with consummate ease.

Next up was Lammershoek, which is quite literally just around the corner from Sadie. In fact, the Sadie setup is on a small piece of property originally purchased from Lammershoek. At Lammershoek Zaine was waiting for us. He first conducted a comprehensive and informative tasting, which included a brief history of Lammershoek and an explanation of the objectives of the new management. After the tasting, he took us on a tour of the cellar. Lammershoek has undergone considerable changes since the introduction of overseas capital in a project spearheaded by German football legend Franz Beckenbauer. Despite all the new innovations and increased capital flow their wines are good but not yet in the same class as those of their much smaller next door neighbour.

TOP LEFT: Lammershoek under the guidance of Franz Beckenbauer is on a new track. TOP RIGHT: The tasting commences in a nice new, modern tasting room. CENTRE: Part of the revamped cellar at Lammershoek. BOTTOM LEFT: The fermentation cellar with its epoxy lined open concrete fermentation vats. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Lynnette busy with an open air language instruction class.
TOP LEFT: Lammershoek under the guidance of Franz Beckenbauer is on a new track. TOP RIGHT: The tasting commences in a nice new, modern tasting room. CENTRE: Part of the revamped cellar at Lammershoek. BOTTOM LEFT: The fermentation cellar with its epoxy lined open concrete fermentation vats. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Lynnette busy with an open air language instruction class.

After Lammershoek we were off to Porseleinberg and Calie Louw and that proved to be quite an expedition, over roads that I would normally not have taken the Vito on. The setting of this small winery on top of the Porseleinberg, amid vineyards belonging to Boekenhoutskloof in Franschhoek, is spectacular with 360-degree panoramic views over the Swartland. The wines were as spectacular as the view, if not more so, and Calie’s laid back style of presentation belies his deep appreciation of wine and knowledge of wine crafting.

TOP LEFT: A very nice piece of polished schist inscribed with the Porseleinberg name but displayed in the Boekenhoutskloof cellars in Franschhoek. CENTRE LEFT: In the cellar which just seems far too small for such a big wine. BOTTOM LEFT: A vertical tasting of several vintages of this exceptional wine led by Calie Louw in person. TOP RIGHT: The Young Guns who have upended wine making in the Swartland – Calie Louw, Eben Sadie, Addie Badenhorst and Chris & Andrea Mullineux, depicted in 2012. BOTTOM RIGHT: The same crew on display in 2013.
TOP LEFT: A very nice piece of polished schist inscribed with the Porseleinberg name but displayed in the Boekenhoutskloof cellars in Franschhoek. CENTRE LEFT: In the cellar which just seems far too small for such a big wine. BOTTOM LEFT: A vertical tasting of several vintages of this exceptional wine led by Calie Louw in person. TOP RIGHT: The Young Guns who have upended wine making in the Swartland – Calie Louw, Eben Sadie, Addie Badenhorst and Chris & Andrea Mullineux, depicted in 2012. BOTTOM RIGHT: The same crew on display in 2013.

An interesting fact and one which is suitable for deep discussions over a bottle of one these excellent wines is the fact that Eben Sadie, Callie Louw and Addie Badenhorst of Badenhorst Family Wines on Kalmoesfontein, where we regrettably did not visit, were all keen surfers in their younger days. I believe Eben at one stage actually considered making it a career choice.

Our next stop, after negotiating the daunting gravel road back to the tarred road near Hermon, was at the established and well known Allesverloren wine estate in Riebeeck West.  We first had a late lunch as everyone was more than just a bit peckish by this stage. Lunch was good but the red wines and presentation of the tasting were both a bit of a letdown. The desert wines, however, were excellent. After the tasting, we returned to the guest house with everyone feeling that Thursday had been a long day.

Friday the 5th saw us make an early start for Hartenberg in the Bottelary area west of Stellenbosch.  There we had a most enjoyable cheese board and light snacks followed by an informative and well-presented tasting of their excellent wines. Hartenberg is probably one of the nicest wineries to visit and the grounds are so well maintained too. Their wines are excellent as well, which makes every visit doubly rewarding. We enjoyed the visit so much that we completely forgot to take any pictures! It is just such a pity they uprooted that Pontac bush vine vineyard of theirs some years ago, such a pity.

Our next stop was for a Fairview Master Tasting, which is always a winner. Good wines, some actually excellent and all very well presented in the tasting by properly trained staff; jolly good show Fairview. From Fairview, we nipped next door to do the Spice Route Lunch and tasting.  The wines were definitely a disappointment after Fairview and they were also presented in a very slap-dash manner which did nothing to enhance the quality of either the wine or the general experience. After the Spice Route, back to the guest house, we all went.

TOP LEFT: Anton, Birk and Viljé. TOP RIGHT: In the tasting room for the Master Tasting at Fairview. CENTRE: The view from the restaurant at Allesverloren across the wheat fields and vineyards toward Gouda, Saron and Nieuwekloof Pass. BOTTOM LEFT: A Mad max type vehicle at Fairview. BOTTOM RIGHT: Gathered for lunch at the Spice Route.
TOP LEFT: Anton, Birk and Viljé. TOP RIGHT: In the tasting room for the Master Tasting at Fairview. CENTRE: The view from the restaurant at Allesverloren across the wheat fields and vineyards toward Gouda, Saron and Nieuwekloof Pass. BOTTOM LEFT: A Mad max type vehicle at Fairview. BOTTOM RIGHT: Gathered for lunch at the Spice Route.

On Saturday the 7th we tackled the V&A Waterfront and the Two Oceans Aquarium followed by supper at Den Anker serviced as usual by the impeccable Patrick.

TOP LEFT: Meal at Colcachio in the Willowbridge Centre with Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda and Harald. TOP RIGHT: Anton and Birk. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé and Birk in the V&A shopping centre. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Birk get all the attention from Harald, Anton and Lynnette. BOTTOM CENTRE: At Den Anker in the V&A waterfront with Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda, Edward and Anton. BOTTOM LEFT: A deep-sea salvage vessel in the Robinson Dry Dock in the Alfred Basin. It was built in 1882 and is the oldest functional dry dock of this type in use anywhere in the world.
TOP LEFT: Meal at Colcachio in the Willowbridge Centre with Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda and Harald. TOP RIGHT: Anton and Birk. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé and Birk in the V&A shopping centre. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Birk get all the attention from Harald, Anton and Lynnette. BOTTOM CENTRE: At Den Anker in the V&A waterfront with Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda, Edward and Anton. BOTTOM LEFT: A deep-sea salvage vessel in the Robinson Dry Dock in the Alfred Basin. It was built in 1882 and is the oldest functional dry dock of this type in use anywhere in the world.

Sunday the 8th Lynnette and I prepared a meal which we took to the guest house and enjoyed there. We were joined for the occasion by Lenelle and Susan.

TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lynda arrange the spread Lynnette and I prepared for Sunday lunch at Kolping. CENTRE LEFT: Camilla, Anton, Harald, Lenelle, Susan and Lynnette with her back to the camera. BOTTOM LEFT: Yummy! TOP RIGHT: Anton, Lenelle, Susan and Viljé. BOTTOM RIGHT: At Orca we have Camilla, Linda hidden behind her, Erland, Harald, Anton, and Viljé with her back to the Camera and Birk’s head just showing at the bottom of the photograph.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lynda arrange the spread Lynnette and I prepared for Sunday lunch at Kolping. CENTRE LEFT: Camilla, Anton, Harald, Lenelle, Susan and Lynnette with her back to the camera. BOTTOM LEFT: Yummy! TOP RIGHT: Anton, Lenelle, Susan and Viljé. BOTTOM RIGHT: At Orca we have Camilla, Linda hidden behind her, Erland, Harald, Anton, and Viljé with her back to the Camera and Birk’s head just showing at the bottom of the photograph.

On Monday the 09th we were off to Stellenbosch where we started the day at Reynecke Wines. Their organic policy always creates an interesting discussion with visitors and our visit was no exception. Their wines were interesting, some very good in fact and the presentation by Nuschka was one of the best and most professional we encountered on our various visits.

From Reynecke we nipped around the corner to De Toren.  Here the wine crafter, Charles Williams was personally on hand to take us on the tour.  He started in the vineyard explaining their vineyard policy and them we toured the cellar before ending up in the very cosy little tasting room. The tasting was well presented and the tour was very informative and professionally conducted but, although the wines were good they were not really outstanding. After De Toren, we went to Skilpadvlei, which is just down the road, for lunch.

After lunch, we visited Raats Family Wines with great expectations. Unfortunately, the tasting was a bit of a disappointment.  The wines were not well presented and some of them seemed to have been open quite a while. It is really a pity that a presenter, who seems otherwise to be a very informed person, does not take the trouble to ensure that a tasting is properly presented. A sloppy tasting definitely detracts from the quality of the wines even if they are good or even excellent ones.  After Raats we made a beeline for home to rest up for the next day’s wine tasting.

TOP LEFT: Very well presented tasting with Nuschka at Reynecke Wines. TOP CENTRE: A short talk outside with Charles Williams before going into the cellar at De Toren. TOP RIGHT: Inside the lovely cool cellar with its delicious wine aromas at De Toren. CENTRE: Lunch at Skilpadvlei. BOTTOM LEFT: Maturation cellar at de Toren. BOTTOM CENTRE: Tasting at De Toren. BOTTOM RIGHT: Tasting at Raats Family winery.
TOP LEFT: Very well presented tasting with Nuschka at Reynecke Wines. TOP CENTRE: A short talk outside with Charles Williams before going into the cellar at De Toren. TOP RIGHT: Inside the lovely cool cellar with its delicious wine aromas at De Toren. CENTRE: Lunch at Skilpadvlei. BOTTOM LEFT: Maturation cellar at de Toren. BOTTOM CENTRE: Tasting at De Toren. BOTTOM RIGHT: Tasting at Raats Family winery.

Tuesday the 10th saw us back in the Stellenbosch area and our trip started at the well respected Kanonkop estate. Lynnette and I, being the designated drivers, stayed outside while the rest of the crew went inside to do the tasting. The tasting was apparently a bit of a disappointment because it is very commercialised.  One apparently has to have at least ten people for a proper tasting but we were not informed about this when we phoned to make our reservation and that is simply slipshod administration. Nevertheless, their wines are good, in fact very good but the overall impression would have been better with a more personalised tasting for our overseas visitors.

TOP LEFT: Standing tasting at Kanonkop. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette with Viljé and Birk under the oaks at Kanonkop. BOTTOM: Serious concentration for the tasters.
TOP LEFT: Standing tasting at Kanonkop. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette with Viljé and Birk under the oaks at Kanonkop. BOTTOM: Serious concentration for the tasters.

After Kanonkop we drove to Beyerskloof, who regard themselves as the Pinotage Kings, for a tasting and lunch. The tasting had the same problem as the one at Kanonkop and here to we had not been told of any other arrangements that we could have made when we phoned to enquire about the tastings. Their wines are good and some are excellent but our guests would really liked to have done the tasting blind in a separate tasting area.

TOP: Beyerskloof restaurant from the parking area. BOTTOM LEFT: For those with surplus cash here is one way to spend it, buy a Mendelazar of Beyerskloof Pinotage. BOTTOM RIGHT: The tasters and Lynnette with Birk in the stroller. Here one can see that, like at Kanonkop, one tastes in an open public area.
TOP: Beyerskloof restaurant from the parking area. BOTTOM LEFT: For those with surplus cash here is one way to spend it, buy a Mendelazar of Beyerskloof Pinotage. BOTTOM RIGHT: The tasters and Lynnette with Birk in the stroller. Here one can see that, like at Kanonkop, one tastes in an open public area.

After lunch, the party split up and one group, driven by Lynnette, went looking for diamonds in Stellenbosch while the second group headed for Tokara to taste more wines.  Tokara is a very impressive venue but, as I have experienced before, their tasting presentation is really not up to standard. A tasting where someone slops the wine into your glass then races through a memorised bit of information, spins round and marches off before you have had time to even taste the wine is not a tasting, it is a farce. Add to this the fact that their wines are not as good as they would like to believe they are and Tokara was a disappointment.  After Tokara, we picked up the rest of the party in Stellenbosch and headed for home.

Wednesday the 11th the group did a township tour with Imvuyo Township Tours & Chippa Mbuyiseli Mngangwa.  The group were ecstatic about his punctuality and service delivery. Good work Chippa, I will certainly use you again. Later that afternoon we went to Orca in Melkbos for supper and that was, as always, a worthwhile experience.

Franschhoek was the destination for Anton Erland and I on Thursday the 12th while Lynnette took the ladies to Cape Town where they wanted to do some serious shopping. The first stop in Franschhoek was Boekenhoutskloof, the umbrella company for Porseleinberg.  What a difference though! The place is all glitz, glass and glamour and makes Porseleinberg look like a pauper’s digs. However, their wine quality does not come close to that of Porseleinberg. Some of it is good but the guests did not think there was anything outstanding.

TOP LEFT: The impressive tasting room at Boekenhoutskloof. TOP CENTRE: The serious business of actually deciding which wine to buy. TOP RIGHT: The old mud and stone walls of the cellar. Note the holes drilled by the wasps to hide the caterpillars and spiders they catch as food for the still to be hatched young. BOTTOM: This door leaves no doubt as to where you are.
TOP LEFT: The impressive tasting room at Boekenhoutskloof. TOP CENTRE: The serious business of actually deciding which wine to buy. TOP RIGHT: The old mud and stone walls of the cellar. Note the holes drilled by the wasps to hide the caterpillars and spiders they catch as food for the still to be hatched young. BOTTOM: This door leaves no doubt as to where you are.

Next stop was Haute Cabriére at the foot of the Franschhoek Pass. The tasting was presented in very much the same fashion as the one at Tokara, perhaps a little better, and the wines were good but lacklustre with nothing to write home about. After this disappointment, we headed for Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines with high hopes. On arrival, it was clear that this place has money and spends it. The tasting emporium is impressive and the attention very personal. Lizzie, the presenter, was informative and knowledgeable about a wide range of topics related to the wines we tasted. It might seem like nit-picking, but the amount given to taste was really minuscule compared to all the other tasting we had attended and the speed with which the bottles were whisked away, clearly indicated that there was no chance of tasting anything a second time. Considering that this was one of the more expensive tastings this skimpiness is inexplicable.

TOP LEFT: Anton, Erland and Harald, tasting at Tokara, probably the least professionally presented tasting we had. TOP RIGHT: The tasting and wine purchase area at Tokara. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton and Erland outside Haut Cabriére with which they were also unimpressed. BOTTOM RIGHT: Erland and Anton outside the imposing entrance to the Mullineux Leeu wine emporium in Franschhoek.
TOP LEFT: Anton, Erland and Harald, tasting at Tokara, probably the least professionally presented tasting we had. TOP RIGHT: The tasting and wine purchase area at Tokara. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton and Erland outside Haut Cabriére with which they were also unimpressed. BOTTOM RIGHT: Erland and Anton outside the imposing entrance to the Mullineux Leeu wine emporium in Franschhoek.

After Mullineux and Leeu we were off to La Motte, making it just before closing time. Unfortunately, the proximity to closing time seemed to also have affected the tasting session. It was rushed to the point of being rude and the wines were a disappointment too. If you take somebody’s money for a tasting then, irrespective of how close it is to closing time, the person is entitled to the same quality tasting experience as somebody who rocked up two hours earlier. The highlight of the visit was the bright yellow Ferrari in the parking area; what a machine! We drove home with mixed feelings about Franschhoek and its wines.

Friday the 13th was Anton’s birthday and we started that off with a surprise birthday breakfast at Kolping Guest House and ended the day with a dinner at the Cattle Baron in the Tygervalley Waterfront.

TOP LEFT: The dining hall at Kolping set up for Anton’s 40th birthday. TOP CENTRE: The menu for the birthday breakfast. TOP RIGHT: Charmain’s cupcakes. BOTTOM: Cupcakes on display.
TOP LEFT: The dining hall at Kolping set up for Anton’s 40th birthday. TOP CENTRE: The menu for the birthday breakfast. TOP RIGHT: Charmain’s cupcakes. BOTTOM: Cupcakes on display.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette, Erland, Lynda, Petro, Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. TOP RIGHT: Harald and Anne-Kirsten. BOTTOM LEFT: Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Lynnette, Erland and Linda.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette, Erland, Lynda, Petro, Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. TOP RIGHT: Harald and Anne-Kirsten. BOTTOM LEFT: Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Lynnette, Erland and Linda.
TOP LEFT: Harald, Birk and Anton Viljé (only her head) and Camilla. TOP RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lenelle, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and Lynnette (back to the camera). CENTRE: Group photo taken by Susan, Front from left to right: Ansie, Viljé, Ma Peggy, Petro, Nadine, 2nd Row from left to right: Linda, Anne-Kirsten, Birk, Camilla, Lynnette, Edward, Lenelle, Back from left to right: Erland, Harald, Anton, Deon, Peter. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton, Birk, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Petro, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy (hidden) and Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lynnette, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Anton, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy, Edward, Birk.
TOP LEFT: Harald, Birk and Anton Viljé (only her head) and Camilla. TOP RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lenelle, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and Lynnette (back to the camera). CENTRE: Group photo taken by Susan, Front from left to right: Ansie, Viljé, Ma Peggy, Petro, Nadine, 2nd Row from left to right: Linda, Anne-Kirsten, Birk, Camilla, Lynnette, Edward, Lenelle, Back from left to right: Erland, Harald, Anton, Deon, Peter. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton, Birk, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Petro, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy (hidden) and Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lynnette, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Anton, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy, Edward, Birk.

On Saturday the 14th we went on a short tour of the Peninsula which included only Boulders and Cape Point. At Cape Point, some members of the party walked up to the lighthouse and after that, we drove down to the Cape of Good Hope before going home. Judging by the subdued appearance of the group it looked as if the pace was starting to take its toll

TOP: Anne-Kirsten and Harald make their way down the boardwalk toward the entrance of the Boulders penguin area. 2nd FROM TOP: Waiting for the tickets are Anton, Lynnette, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and over on the far right are Erland and Linda. 2ND FROM BOTTOM: Looking over Simons Bay and False Bay toward Muizenberg. BOTTOM: Penguins, penguins and yet more penguins spread across the beach at Boulders.
TOP: Anne-Kirsten and Harald make their way down the boardwalk toward the entrance of the Boulders penguin area. 2nd FROM TOP: Waiting for the tickets are Anton, Lynnette, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and over on the far right are Erland and Linda. 2ND FROM BOTTOM: Looking over Simons Bay and False Bay toward Muizenberg. BOTTOM: Penguins, penguins and yet more penguins spread across the beach at Boulders.
LEFT: Erland and Linda, TOP RIGHT: Anton and Viljé at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé investigating the marine fauna. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Anne-Kirsten and a uncooperative Birk at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula.
LEFT: Erland and Linda, TOP RIGHT: Anton and Viljé at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé investigating the marine fauna. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Anne-Kirsten and an uncooperative Birk at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula.

On Sunday the 15th Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Erland and Linda departed for Gauteng from where they would head for the Kruger National Park and spend three days there before flying home to Norway.

TOP: Erland, Linda, Anne-Kirsten and Harald at the Cape Town International Airport prior to departure for Oliver Tambo in Gauteng on their way to the Kruger National Park BOTTOM Last minute selfies and messages before embarking with Harald partially decapitated.
TOP: Erland, Linda, Anne-Kirsten and Harald at the Cape Town International Airport prior to departure for Oliver Tambo in Gauteng on their way to the Kruger National Park BOTTOM: Last minute selfies and messages before embarking with Harald partially decapitated.

 

Stargazing at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront: Saturday 05th of November 2016.

I do not know which of the following is applicable to our case “You cannot have your cake and eat it” or “What you gain on the swings you loose on the roundabouts”. On the one hand we had bright sunshine and a six day old waxing moon that was situated very nicely but, on the other hand, we had a brisk and fairly chilly South-Easter that pushed clumps of fluffy clouds across our field of view all afternoon and, to top it all, there were only two minuscule sunspots visible.

TOP: Getting onto the N1 from Brackenfell is a problem nowadays because of the road works between Brackenfell and the Panorama turn-off. Even on a Saturday morning the traffic is slow. The clouds over Table Mountain also did not look too promising. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Passing the Panorama turn-off it looked clear over the sea to the west of Cape Town. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Approaching the Giel Basson turnoff and the clouds seemed poised just east of the Victoria and Albert Waterfront, ready to advance as soon as we have set-up. Go here (http://www.waterfront.co.za/ ) to read more about this premier tourist attraction in Cape Town. BOTTOM: The last lap on Marine Drive with a fluffy cloud peeking out from behind the road sign.
TOP: Getting onto the N1 from Brackenfell is a problem nowadays because of the road works between Brackenfell and the Panorama turn-off. Even on a Saturday morning the traffic is slow. The clouds over Table Mountain also did not look too promising. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Passing the Panorama turn-off it looked clear over the sea to the west of Cape Town. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Approaching the Giel Basson turnoff and the clouds seemed poised just east of the Victoria and Albert Waterfront, ready to advance as soon as we have set-up. Go here to read more about this premier tourist attraction in Cape Town. BOTTOM: The last lap on Marine Drive with a fluffy cloud peeking out from behind the road sign.

Auke was already there and Eddy and Jannie arrived shortly after us with Dirk about 30 minutes after them. Alan and Rose weren’t there because Alan had to work and Wendy could also not make it as her husband was ill and had been hospitalized.

TOP: Dirk (in red) setting up while Eddy (in the white hat) and myself (in the blue shirt) talk to some of the first guests. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke and his new Celestron with an interested member of the public. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The poster advertising the ASSA (go here to find out more about ASSA https://assa.saao.ac.za/ ) Sky Guide, published by Struik (find out more about Struik and their excellent publications here http://struik.bookslive.co.za/about/ and their nature publications here http://www.struiknatureclub.co.za/about-us.php ). This is the one book no self-respecting amateur astronomer in South Africa should be without. BOTTOM: Many people did not know one could see the Moon during daytime and were keen to view it through the telescope.
TOP: Dirk (in red) setting up while Eddy (in the white hat) and myself (in the blue shirt) talk to some of the first guests. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke and his new Celestron with an interested member of the public. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The poster advertising the ASSA (go here to find out more about ASSA. Sky Guide, published by Struik (find out more about Struik and their excellent publications here  and their nature publications here). This is the one book no self-respecting amateur astronomer in South Africa should be without. BOTTOM: Many people did not know one could see the Moon during daytime and were keen to view it through the telescope.
TOP: Auke and his new Celestron helping some visitors look at the moon. MIDDLE: I nudge Lorenzo to keep it on the Moon while waiting for the next batch of viewers. BOTTOM: Quite a few people wanted to take photos of the Moon with their mobile phones, but that takes a steady hand and a bit of practice.
TOP: Auke and his new Celestron helping some visitors look at the moon. MIDDLE: I nudge Lorenzo to keep it on the Moon while waiting for the next batch of viewers. BOTTOM: Quite a few people wanted to take photos of the Moon with their mobile phones, but that takes a steady hand and a bit of practice.

The brisk South-Easter was quite cold and, as we had suspected the wind drove a never ending series of fluffy clouds across the face of the Moon limiting viewing to the intervening gaps between them. I decided not to even try the Sun as the two diminutive sunspots were really not worth the effort and concentrated on the Moon.

TOP: Eddy, the Chairperson of ASSA’s Cape Centre, entertains a group of visitors while Jannie (in red) keeps her eye on the telescope. Go here to find out more about ASSA’s Cape Centre (http://www.capecentre.org.za/ ). BOTTOM: Dirk looking pleased with himself. The white vessel visible directly behind Dirk’s telescope is Sikhululekile (Eng. Free or Set Free), the ill fated Robben Island ferry. Go here to read more about this expensive vessel and its equally expensive problems (http://www.iol.co.za/capetimes/rocks-ruin-r26m-robben-island-ferry-1803068 ).
TOP: Eddy, the Chairperson of ASSA’s Cape Centre, entertains a group of visitors while Jannie (in red) keeps her eye on the telescope. Go here to find out more about ASSA’s Cape Centre. BOTTOM: Dirk looking pleased with himself. The white vessel visible directly behind Dirk’s telescope is Sikhululekile (Eng. Free or Set Free), the ill fated Robben Island ferry. Go here to read more about this expensive vessel and its equally expensive problems.
TOP: The Sky Guide advertisements (there were two) were clearly visible to all comers. BOTTOM: Myself and Lorenzo up front while Auke and Dirk consult in the background. In the foreground is our StarPeople poster with the two ASSA Merit Awards. One award was for our general outreach efforts and the other for organizing the Southern Star Party twice a year since 2011. Go here to read more about the awards (http://elfastronomy.com/2016/09/16/astronomical-society-of-southern-africa-merit-awards-2016/ ) and here to read about the the Southern Star Party that was held in February 2016 (http://elfastronomy.com/2016/02/15/the-autumn-2016-southern-star-party-night-sky-caravan-farm-05-to-07-february-2016/ ) or here to read about the Star party held in October 2016 (http://elfastronomy.com/2016/11/13/the-spring-2016-southern-star-party-night-sky-caravan-farm-26-to-30-october-2016/ ).
TOP: The Sky Guide advertisements (there were two) were clearly visible to all comers. BOTTOM: Myself and Lorenzo up front while Auke and Dirk consult in the background. In the foreground is our StarPeople poster with the two ASSA Merit Awards. One award was for our general outreach efforts and the other for organizing the Southern Star Party twice a year since 2011. Go here to read more about the awards and here to read about the Southern Star Party that was held in February 2016 or here to read about the Southern Star Party held in October 2016.

There were fewer people around and this seems to be the pattern when there is a bit of wind. I also think that in the wind people tend to bunch up more at the Swing Bridge and are less inclined to look around. There seems to be a greater sense of urgency to get across.  Also for the people coming from the other side they seem to move straight on and not fan out as they do on days when there is less wind.

TOP: Lorenzo and I showing the Moon to three eager viewers. MIDDLE: Three presenters in a row! I am in the foreground; Auke is in the middle and, in the background, is Eddy wearing the white hat. BOTTOM: The same sequence but now Jannie (in red) has joined Eddy.
TOP: Lorenzo and I showing the Moon to three eager viewers. MIDDLE: Three presenters in a row! I am in the foreground; Auke is in the middle and, in the background, is Eddy wearing the white hat. BOTTOM: The same sequence but now Jannie (in red) has joined Eddy.
TOP: Now and again one sees one of these huge container vessels coming in – very impressive. BOTTOM: Jannie on the left and Eddy with a International Observe the Moon Night information sheet, talking to two visitors with the red Clock Tower in the background (Go here to read more about this historic landmark in the V&A Waterfront dating back to 1883 http://www.cape-town-heritage.co.za/heritage-site/clock-tower.html ).
TOP: Now and again one sees one of these huge container vessels coming in – very impressive. BOTTOM: Jannie on the left and Eddy with a International Observe the Moon Night information sheet, talking to two visitors with the red Clock Tower in the background (Go here to read more about this historic landmark in the V&A Waterfront dating back to 1883.

There were fewer clouds as the afternoon wore on and by sunset we had almost uninterrupted views of the moon. I decided to give viewers a special treat and added a 3x Barlow to my 25 mm eyepiece.  That never fails to draw Wows, OMG’s, Awesome’s. Nooo’s and even a You Lie or two from the viewers. It takes a bit more nudging and shoving, but the effect on viewers is more than worth the trouble. In addition Lorenzo has the advantage of being more stable and less prone to wind induced vibrations than the smaller telescopes.

TOP: As the light dimmed the view of the Moon got better. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke on the left, Dirk in the middle, Jannie and Eddy on the right. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: With the amount of light pollution in the Waterfront it is amazing that one can see anything other than the Moon. BOTTOM: A young visitor eyeballs the six day old waxing Moon.
TOP: As the light dimmed the view of the Moon got better. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke on the left, Dirk in the middle, Jannie and Eddy on the right. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: With the amount of light pollution in the Waterfront it is amazing that one can see anything other than the Moon. BOTTOM: A young visitor eyeballs the six day old waxing Moon.
TOP: Auke interacting with a very interested young visitor. BOTTOM: Dirk discussing details of the Moon with some visitors. Jannie’s white top is just visible on the right.
TOP: Auke interacting with a very interested young visitor. BOTTOM: Dirk discussing details of the Moon with some visitors. Jannie’s white top is just visible on the right.

Once the Sun was down it became really chilly and one once again had to marvel at the fact that one could actually show people celestial objects from such a heavily light polluted site as the Pierhead. Unfortunately Venus and Saturn were not well placed for viewing from our position and the best position would have been under the coloured fairy lights on the quayside.

TOP: Jannie on the left looks on while Eddy explains some finer points. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke entertains some younger viewers. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Lights, lights and more lights! Very pretty but also a major source of light pollution in Cape Town. BOTTOM: Dirk interacts with visitors and Jannie in the white top can be seen on the right.
TOP: Jannie on the left looks on while Eddy explains some finer points. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke entertains some younger viewers. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Lights, lights and more lights! Very pretty but also a major source of light pollution in Cape Town. BOTTOM: Dirk interacts with visitors and Jannie in the white top can be seen on the right.

To top it all you can watch the entire afternoon and evening in one very fast You Tube video if you click here.

We started packing up at 21:00 and when Dirk Lynnette and I headed home Auke, Jannie and Eddy strolled over to Den Anker for a late night cup of coffee or two.

Stargazing at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront: Saturday 10th of September 2016.

We had bright sunshine and clear skies but on the way into Cape Town there was a suspicious looking cloud hanging around over the Eastern end of Table Mountain and the Devil’s Peak. I say suspicious because clouds like that, more often than not, are the forerunners of a South-Easter in Cape Town. This proved to be correct in this case although it did not develop into a full scale gale it was cold and a nuisance on the Pierhead.

TOP: There’s that ominous cloud crouching over Table Mountain. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan in action with the Solar Telescope. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Auke lends a hand with the waiting viewers. BOTTOM: Wendy and her brand new telescope. No more pushing and shoving because this little baby can find and track on its own.
TOP: There’s that ominous cloud crouching over Table Mountain. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan in action with the Solar Telescope. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Auke lends a hand with the waiting viewers. BOTTOM: Wendy and her brand new telescope. No more pushing and shoving because this little baby can find and track on its own.

By the time the Noon Day Gun (there is an informative piece on Wikipedia about this Cape Town icon) had sounded we were on site and setting up, followed shortly by Alan and Rose and then by Dirk. Auke and Wendy arrived a bit later. Wendy was just back from gallivanting around England and had brought het new telescope along for its inaugural session. The wind very quickly gave us to understand that today was not a day for banners, or A-frame poster displays. Later on it even toppled our trestles with the A2-framed posters and some of the gusts turned over tables and caused general mayhem. Dirk and Wendy’s smaller telescopes constantly had the jitters and even Alan’s eight inch Dobby and Lorenzo were not completely steady.

TOP: Dirk setting up to show the Moon on the small screen. MIDDLE: Wendy looking slightly perplexed. Did the visitors ask a tricky question? BOTTOM: Alan explaining sunspots.
TOP: Dirk setting up to show the Moon on the small screen. MIDDLE: Wendy looking slightly perplexed. Did the visitors ask a tricky question? BOTTOM: Alan explaining sunspots.
TOP: Alan lining up the telescope for a visitor. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The view from the Pierhead is a colourful one and there is always something going on. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Nelson Mandela Gateway to Robben Island and the iconic red Clock Tower. BOTTOM: Dirk with one of the shorter visitors taking a look at the Moon.
TOP: Alan lining up the telescope for a visitor. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The view from the Pierhead is a colourful one and there is always something going on. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Nelson Mandela Gateway to Robben Island and the iconic red Clock Tower. BOTTOM: Dirk with one of the shorter visitors taking a look at the Moon.

The moon was well up by 13:30 so Dirk could get his scope set on that as he does not have a solar filter for viewing the Sun. The Sun, by the way, was sporting a nice crop of sunspots unlike on our previous outing. I don’t know if it was the wind but the people were disinclined to look through the telescopes and needed quite a bit of coaxing. We eventually tallied up just under 600 visitors but felt that, with the sunshine, we should have had more.

TOP: Alan conducting serious discussions about the Sun and sunspots. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Two of the vessels currently being used to ferry visitors to Robben Island. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The Pilot Boat sets out to help one of the big vessels into the harbour. BOTTOM: Lorenzo and I showing off the Sun and its spots.
TOP: Alan conducting serious discussions about the Sun and sunspots. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Two of the vessels currently being used to ferry visitors to Robben Island. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The Pilot Boat sets out to help one of the big vessels into the harbour. BOTTOM: Lorenzo and I showing off the Sun and its spots.
TOP: A younger visitor gets special attention from Alan. MIDDLE: Lorenzo and I have a visitor interested in the Sun BOTTOM: Dirk helping Wendy sort out her new baby’s teething problems.
TOP: A younger visitor gets special attention from Alan. MIDDLE: Lorenzo and I have a visitor interested in the Sun BOTTOM: Dirk helping Wendy sort out her new baby’s teething problems.

The Chairperson of ASSA’s (Astronomical Society of Southern Africa) Cape Centre, Eddy Nijeboer also paid us a visit. Thanks Eddy it was nice to have somebody from the Cape Centre joining Wendy at the Pierhead. You can go here to find out more about ASSA and visit this page to find out more about the Cape Centre. If you are interested in astronomy please join ASSA or, if you live in Cape Town join the Cape Centre.

Venus was a nice early evening target for a short while and Saturn was well positioned for viewing. The Moon is always a good attraction and never fails to elicit exclamations of surprise, delight or amazement from even the apparently disinterested viewers. Despite what looked like clear skies, it soon became apparent the wind was driving moisture through the atmosphere somewhere above us, because the view through the telescope was just not as crisp as we would have wanted it to be. This wasn’t as visible when looking at the Moon but the effects were quite pronounced when looking at Saturn.

TOP: Alan (on the left) and me with Lorenzo (on the right) during a busy period. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Suddenly Alan and I were quite busy. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Wendy and her new baby with a visitor. BOTTOM: These visitors were very interested and it turns out that they visited our show at the Bonnievale Bonanza two years ago.
TOP: Alan (on the left) and me with Lorenzo (on the right) during a busy period. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Suddenly Alan and I were quite busy. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Wendy and her new baby with a visitor. BOTTOM: These visitors were very interested and it turns out that they visited our show at the Bonnievale Bonanza three years ago.
This gentleman was inebriated. Not staggeringly drunk but definitely surrounded by a naseliferometricaly detectable alcoholic aura and imbued with that characteristic, ethanol induced wisdom. He knew everything, questioned everything loudly and was not shy to advertise his superior knowledge to all and sundry within a radius of at least 25 metres. As if that wasn’t bad enough he then started questioning whatever we said on religious grounds, mocking us and all technology loudly based on his views. A very unpleasant experience indeed and one we could well have done without.
This gentleman was inebriated. Not staggeringly drunk but definitely surrounded by a naseliferometricaly detectable alcoholic aura and imbued with a characteristic, ethanol induced wisdom. He knew everything, questioned everything loudly and was not shy to advertise his superior knowledge to all and sundry within a radius of at least 25 metres. As if that wasn’t bad enough he then started questioning whatever we said on religious grounds, mocking us and all technology loudly based on his views. A very unpleasant experience indeed and one we could well have done without.

After the show we all had coffee at Den Anker served by our favourite waitron, Patrick, before heading home. Go here to find out more about this Belgian restaurant in the Waterfront.

Our future dates at the Waterfront can all be found by visiting (http://www.waterfront.co.za/events/Family/stargazing-at-the-waterfront).

Stargazing at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront: Saturday 20th of August 2016.

We had bright sunshine and clear skies which was nice but there were no sunspots and also no moon before almost 21:00. So why on earth did we choose Saturday the 20th to set up in the waterfront?  Actually we didn’t exactly choose it, it was chosen for us by circumstances. Our scheduled date was Saturday the 13th of August but, let me go right back to the beginning and explain what happened.

National Science Week (click here to find out more about the activities presented during National Science Week) was to have taken place from the 30th of July to the 06th of August. StarPeople had been fortunate enough to receive a grant to promote the 2016 theme “Renewable Energy” (Go here or go here) to find out more about renewable energy in South Africa)in the amphitheater in front of the Iziko South African Museum in Cape Town (go here to find out more about this exciting venue). However, the State President announced that the Local Government Elections would be held on the 3rd of August and the NRF/SAASTA promptly moved National Science Week forward to run from the 06th to the 13th of August.

TOP LEFT: The Vito all packed up and ready to go to the Waterfront. TOP CENTER: Heading down the N1 past the Durbanville turnoff. TOP RIGHT: Being Saturday there was no actual work in progress but the lane and speed restrictions remained. MIDDLE: Constantiaberg on the far left and Signal Hill on the far right with a spot of cloud just to the left of Devil’s Peak. BOTTOM LEFT: Down the hill past the Panorama turn-off with Table Bay in the distance. BOTTOM CENTER: The turn-off to Cape Town International Airport coming up and that cloud is still hanging around. BOTTOM RIGHT: Optimistic evaluation of the cloud said it was shrinking and not growing.
TOP LEFT: The Vito all packed up and ready to go to the Waterfront. TOP CENTER: Heading down the N1 past the Durbanville turnoff. TOP RIGHT: Being Saturday there was no actual work in progress but the lane and speed restrictions remained. MIDDLE: Constantiaberg on the far left and Signal Hill on the far right with a spot of cloud just to the left of Devil’s Peak. BOTTOM LEFT: Down the hill past the Panorama turn-off with Table Bay in the distance. BOTTOM CENTER: The turn-off to Cape Town International Airport coming up and that cloud is still hanging around. BOTTOM RIGHT: Optimistic evaluation of the cloud said it was shrinking and not growing.
LEFT: No not a weapon of mass destruction but the Solarscope very generously donated by Mr Jurg Wagener owner of the well known Sterland and Kambrokind in Sutherland. TOP RIGHT: Side view of the Solarscope with useful information on the inner solar system. BOTTOM RIGHT: The other side of the Solarscope with a convenient tool for measuring the altitude of the sun when viewing.
LEFT: No not a weapon of mass destruction but the Solarscope very generously donated by Mr Jurg Wagener owner of the well known Sterland and Kambrokind in Sutherland. TOP RIGHT: Side view of the Solarscope with useful information on the inner solar system. BOTTOM RIGHT: The other side of the Solarscope with a convenient tool for measuring the altitude of the sun when viewing.

We had to decide whether to cancel our Waterfront date on the 13th or to move it one week on. We opted for the latter choice, knowing that the moon would only be out later but still hoping for some sunspots. We didn’t have sunspots, but the change of date wasn’t all negative because the weather was overcast and rainy on the 13th so we would not have been able to set up in the Waterfront in any case.

TOP LEFT: The moment the telescopes appear people start lining up to take look. TOP RIGHT: Auke checking Lorenzo’s sun filter while I explain something to visitors from Stellenbosch. MIDDLE LEFT: Alan and Auke with Brett’s sun telescope and group from the UK. BOTTOM LEFT: Alan sporting his new astronomy hat explaining some astronomy to visitors. I sort of liked his Newlands Cricket headgear more. BOTTOM RIGHT: Dirk looks on looking slightly perplexed at my antics. I also have selective amnesia about exactly what I was up to.
TOP LEFT: The moment the telescopes appear people start lining up to take look. TOP RIGHT: Auke checking Lorenzo’s sun filter while I explain something to visitors from Stellenbosch. MIDDLE LEFT: Alan and Auke with Brett’s sun telescope and group from the UK. BOTTOM LEFT: Alan sporting his new astronomy hat explaining some astronomy to visitors. I sort of liked his Newlands Cricket headgear more. BOTTOM RIGHT: Dirk looks on looking slightly perplexed at my antics. I also have selective amnesia about exactly what I was up to.

So, there we were with no sunspots and a late moon but beautiful weather and lots of enthusiastic people (680 visited us) all eager to get to know more about astronomy.  Auke also had a table set up with some of the material and demonstrations on renewable energy that we had used during National Science Week. This also attracted quite a lot of attention.

TOP LEFT: A closer look at Alan and his new hat. TOP RIGHT: Auke taking a break while contemplating the benefits (if any) of astronomy outreach. BOTTOM LEFT: Dirk and I comparing notes or is Dirk telling another fishy tale. BOTTOM RIGHT: The lady at Alan’s telescope told us that her late father used to haul them out of bed in the dead of night and have them lie on their backs on the lawn to look at the stars. Give that man a Bells!
TOP LEFT: A closer look at Alan and his new hat. TOP RIGHT: Auke taking a break while contemplating the benefits (if any) of astronomy outreach. BOTTOM LEFT: Dirk and I comparing notes or is Dirk telling another fishy tale. BOTTOM RIGHT: The lady at Alan’s telescope told us that her late father used to haul them out of bed in the dead of night and have them lie on their backs on the lawn to look at the stars. Give that man a Bells!

The lack of sunspots gave us the opportunity to talk about other aspects of astronomy and space exploration, after allowing people to view the sun through our specially protected telescopes. Our display about space junk attracted a lot of attention as well. The fact that outer space was a mere 100 km away compared to all the other places on the Pierhead signpost left many of our visitors a bit shell shocked too.

TOP LEFT: The traffic at the telescopes is governed by the Swing Bridge. When it is shut the people waiting at the western end have time to look around and they use that to come over and look through the telescopes. TOP RIGHT: Dirk explain optics to two visitors. MIDDLE LEFT: Two of Dirk’s visitors seem perplexed about something. MIDDLE RIGHT: Alan in full swing, or is it song?. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke explaining renewable energy to two young visitors. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan and Auke explaining why there were no sunspots.
TOP LEFT: The traffic at the telescopes is governed by the Swing Bridge. When it is shut the people waiting at the western end have time to look around and they use that to come over and look through the telescopes. TOP RIGHT: Dirk explain optics to two visitors. MIDDLE LEFT: Two of Dirk’s visitors seem perplexed about something. MIDDLE RIGHT: Alan in full swing, or is it song?. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke explaining renewable energy to two young visitors. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan and Auke explaining why there were no sunspots.

Dirk was not quite his normal chirpy self and still had a cough and sore ribs after his recent indisposition, so he left pretty sharply at 21:00 to get out of the cold night air. Alan and Rose also opted to get home and get some well earned rest while Auke, Lynnette and I decided to have coffee at Den Anker (click here to find out more about this delightful restaurant), where Patrick was delighted to see Lynnette and I again.

TOP: Just before 21:00 the moon rose over the distant Tygerberg Hills and the much closer harbour cranes. MIDDLE: Auke explaining some finer points to visitors from the safety of his chair. BOTTOM: Looking over to the West one can clearly see the huge amount of light pollution generated by the Waterfront.
TOP: Just before 21:00 the moon rose over the distant Tygerberg Hills and the much closer harbour cranes. MIDDLE: Auke explaining some finer points to visitors from the safety of his chair. BOTTOM: Looking over to the West one can clearly see the huge amount of light pollution generated by the Waterfront.

Also on the positive side I should mention that we had very little dew, so our equipment and other material was put away dry. This meant Lynnette and I could pack everything away without first unpacking all the stuff and laying it out in the sun to dry. What a joy and also a huge saving in time and effort for the two of us.

Our future dates at the Waterfront can all be found by visiting here.

Stargazing at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront: Saturday the 09th of July 2016.

“Third time lucky” is an expression one often hears and it certainly applied to or stargazing efforts at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront. After poor weather in May and worse weather in June we had fantastic open skies this time. Unfortunately the Sun wasn’t as well endowed with sunspots as we would have like it to be, which immediately brings to mind the hackneyed expression “What you lose on the swings, you gain on the roundabouts”.

TOP LEFT: Lion’s Head and Signal Hill against a clear blue sky as we head for Cape Town on the N1. BOTTOM LEFT: Table Mountain and Devil’s Peak from the N1. TOP RIGHT: Devil’s Peak from the N2. MIDDLE RIGHT: Lion’s Head and Signal Hill as we pass Paarden Island on the N1. BOTTOM RIGHT: The final approach to the Victoria and Albert Waterfront.
TOP LEFT: Lion’s Head and Signal Hill against a clear blue sky as we head for Cape Town on the N1. BOTTOM LEFT: Table Mountain and Devil’s Peak from the N1. TOP RIGHT: Devil’s Peak from the N2. MIDDLE RIGHT: Lion’s Head and Signal Hill as we pass Paarden Island on the N1. BOTTOM RIGHT: The final approach to the Victoria and Albert Waterfront.
TOP LEFT: The harbour entrance from the Pierhead. TOP RIGHT: View from the Pierhead toward the main shopping centre at the Waterfront. MIDDLE LEFT: A pirate ship full of sightseers coming home. MIDDLE RIGHT: The container ship “Yellowstone” being brought into the harbour. BOTTOM LEFT: “Southern Cross” taking its umpteenth load of sightseers out to sea. BOTTOM RIGHT: The pirate ship returning to its moorings after the last trip of the day.
TOP LEFT: The harbour entrance from the Pierhead. TOP RIGHT: View from the Pierhead toward the main shopping centre at the Waterfront. MIDDLE LEFT: A pirate ship full of sightseers coming home. MIDDLE RIGHT: The container ship “Yellowstone” being brought into the harbour. BOTTOM LEFT:Southern Cross” taking its umpteenth load of sightseers out to sea. BOTTOM RIGHT: The pirate ship returning to its moorings after the last trip of the day.

Lynnette and I made had to first drop John-Henry off in Mowbray but we were still first on the scene followed by Alan and Rose, then Dirk and lastly Auke and the birthday girl, Wendy. It soon became clear that the fine weather had lured the visitors out in force and there were many more people in the Waterfront than on either of our previous visits. We were soon very busy.

The seagulls were really out in force on Saturday.
The seagulls were really out in force on Saturday.
TOP LEFT: Maphefu (an eight-inch Dobsonian), partially hidden on the left with Auke and Wendy in attendance. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke shielding a visitor at the eyepiece from the sun. TOP RIGHT: Getting Lorenzo (a 10-inch Dobsonian) set up while three visitors wait patiently. MIDDLE RIGHT: Maphefu and Auke on the left and Lorenzo and I partially obscured behind the poster A-frame. BOTTOM RIGHT: Lorenzo and I with interested visitors.
TOP LEFT: Maphefu (an eight-inch Dobsonian), partially hidden on the left with Auke and Wendy in attendance. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke shielding a visitor at the eyepiece from the sun. TOP RIGHT: Getting Lorenzo (a 10-inch Dobsonian) set up while three visitors wait patiently. MIDDLE RIGHT: Maphefu and Auke on the left and Lorenzo and I partially obscured behind the poster A-frame. BOTTOM RIGHT: Lorenzo and I with interested visitors.

Alan and Rosemary had their eight-inch Dobsonian set up close to the water’s edge. I suppose you can take a man out of the Navy but you can’t really take the sea out of a naval man, Alan? Dirk set up his Celestron close to the two red poodles, probably because he missed his Yorkies, while Auke and Wendy set up Maphefu, Auke’s eight-inch Dobsonian, an outreach veteran, next to the signpost.

TOP LEFT: Lorenzo and I discussing laser interferometry with a visitor. The tube mounted on Lorenzo is the (Bob) Marley 40 mm Solar-finder. BOTTOM LEFT: Alan and a group of visitors viewing the Moon through his eight-inch Dobsonian. TOP RIGHT: Auke, Maphefu and Wendy discussing the Sun with a younger group of visitors. MIDDLE RIGHT: Wendy and Maphefu on the left and Lorenzo and I on the right. BOTTOM RIGHT: Dirk and his Celestron entertain two visitors.
TOP LEFT: Lorenzo and I discussing laser interferometry with a visitor. The tube mounted on Lorenzo is the (Bob) Marley 40 mm Solar-finder. BOTTOM LEFT: Alan and a group of visitors viewing the Moon through his eight-inch Dobsonian. TOP RIGHT: Auke, Maphefu and Wendy discussing the Sun with a younger group of visitors. MIDDLE RIGHT: Wendy and Maphefu on the left and Lorenzo and I on the right. BOTTOM RIGHT: Dirk and his Celestron entertain two visitors.

Auke had his very nifty demonstration of how to use a simple pinhole to calculate the size of the Sun set up there as well. Lynnette and I set up Lorenzo our workhorse 10-inch Dobsonian, also a veteran of many outreach events, a short distance away from Auke and Wendy.

TOP: While Lynnette gets Lorenzo on target just watch the two ladies behind her. What is so terrible or astounding that the lady on the right has to hide behind her hand? Sunglasses apparently provide sufficient protection to the lady on the left. MIDDLE: Peeking over her hand with a raised index finger the lady on the right now comments to her friend on the left, who is still watching whatever interests them intently. BOTTOM: The lady on the left is clearly amused while the lady on the right once again shuts her eyes and takes refuge behind her hand.
TOP: While Lynnette gets Lorenzo on target just watch the two ladies behind her. What is so terrible or astounding that the lady on the right has to hide behind her hand? Sunglasses apparently provide sufficient protection to the lady on the left. MIDDLE: Peeking over her hand with a raised index finger the lady on the right now comments to her friend on the left, who is still watching whatever interests them intently. BOTTOM: The lady on the left is clearly amused while the lady on the right once again shuts her eyes and takes refuge behind her hand.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lorenzo with a family of Spanish visitors. TOP RIGHT: Wendy and Maphefu with a visitor at the eyepiece eying the Sun. BOTTOM LEFT: A lull in the stream of visitors gave us the opportunity to sit down for a short while. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan making sure his telescope is on the Moon for two visitors.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lorenzo with a family of Spanish visitors. TOP RIGHT: Wendy and Maphefu with a visitor at the eyepiece eyeing the Sun. BOTTOM LEFT: A lull in the stream of visitors gave us the opportunity to sit down for a short while. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan making sure his telescope is on the Moon for two visitors.

I was surprised by the large number of foreigners but should not really have been, because the V&A is known to be a magnet for foreign tourists. One Spanish family, on seeing the name Lorenzo on our telescope, came up with the following interesting piece of information.

A Spaniard, they said, doesn’t say “the weather is very hot.” He says, “Como pega Lorenzo” (Wow, Lorenzo is hitting) which we verified at this site here. So they sometimes also call the sun “Lorenzo” and you can check that out here.

TOP LEFT: Visitors get a look at the Moon through Alan’s telescope. TOP RIGHT: Dirk and the Celestron entertain a visitor while one of his poodles looks on. MIDDLE LEFT: Lorenzo and I give visitors a look at the Sun which was, by now, quite low in the West. MIDDLE RIGHT: Our banners really did not make a good showing at all. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke and Wendy with visitors around Maphefu. BOTTOM RIGHT: With the Sun so low it was now much easier for the shorter visitors to get to the eyepiece. I had forgotten my ladder – again!
TOP LEFT: Visitors get a look at the Moon through Alan’s telescope. TOP RIGHT: Dirk and the Celestron entertain a visitor while one of his poodles looks on. MIDDLE LEFT: Lorenzo and I give visitors a look at the Sun which was, by now, quite low in the West. MIDDLE RIGHT: Our banners really did not make a good showing at all. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke and Wendy with visitors around Maphefu. BOTTOM RIGHT: With the Sun so low it was now much easier for the shorter visitors to get to the eyepiece. I had forgotten my ladder – again!
TOP: We had quite a few people on site most of the time. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lorenzo and I hard at work while our poster displays generate some interest as well. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Dirk explaining some technicality. I wonder if he doesn’t sometimes tell fish stories when he waves his hands around like that? BOTTOM: Alan just left of centre, Wendy right of centre and Dirk on the right.
TOP: We had quite a few people on site most of the time. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lorenzo and I hard at work while our poster displays generate some interest as well. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Dirk explaining some technicality. I wonder if he doesn’t sometimes tell fish stories when he waves his hands around like that? BOTTOM: Alan just left of centre, Wendy right of centre and Dirk on the right.
TOP LEFT: A group of chuffed visitors have just successfully completed Auke’s Sun-diameter task. TOP RIGHT: The shadows are getting very long as Dirk waits for his next group of visitors. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke showing two visitors how to make things disappear. BOTTOM RIGHT: Auke answering questions for two younger visitors.
TOP LEFT: A group of chuffed visitors have just successfully completed Auke’s Sun-diameter task. TOP RIGHT: The shadows are getting very long as Dirk waits for his next group of visitors. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke showing two visitors how to make things disappear. BOTTOM RIGHT: Auke answering questions for two younger visitors.

It was a warm sunny day with very few sunspots but lots of interested and interesting people. The 30% illuminated waxing moon had risen shortly after 11:00, so it was well positioned for Alan and Dirk who do not have solar filters for their telescopes. My, soon to be patented, (Bob) Marley 40 mm Solar-finder worked very well and the erudite Mr Cassells even complimented me by saying it looked “very professional”.

TOP LEFT: A Dirk and his Celestron wait patiently. TOP RIGHT: The visitors start arriving and Dirk goes into action. MIDDLE LEFT: The back is the best part of a donkey I have always been told. MIDDLE RIGHT: Dirk and the Celestron in action. BOTTOM LEFT: Wow! That is a big globe. BOTTOM RIGHT: The sun is awkwardly low in the West by now and the crowds are definitely thinning.
TOP LEFT: A Dirk and his Celestron wait patiently. TOP RIGHT: The visitors start arriving and Dirk goes into action. MIDDLE LEFT: The back is the best part of a donkey I have always been told. MIDDLE RIGHT: Dirk and the Celestron in action. BOTTOM LEFT: Wow! That is a big globe. BOTTOM RIGHT: The sun is awkwardly low in the West by now and the crowds are definitely thinning.
TOP LEFT: Dirk, the Celestron and his other poodle. MIDDLE LEFT: Our Space Junk poster drew quite a lot of attention. BOTTOM LEFT: After dark we could show visitors Jupiter, Mars and Saturn. TOP RIGHT: By now the Sun was so low that visitors had to get down on their knees so I switched Lorenzo to the Moon. BOTTOM RIGHT: Two very interested visitors who also wanted to receive information on the Southern Star Party.
TOP LEFT: Dirk, the Celestron and his other poodle. MIDDLE LEFT: Our Space Junk poster drew quite a lot of attention. BOTTOM LEFT: After dark we could show visitors Jupiter, Mars and Saturn. TOP RIGHT: By now the Sun was so low that visitors had to get down on their knees so I switched Lorenzo to the Moon. BOTTOM RIGHT: Two very interested visitors who also wanted to receive information on the Southern Star Party.

Once the Sun went down it quickly became chilly but the sky was clear and we were able to show the Moon in high definition as well as Jupiter, Mars and Saturn to a host of visitors. I used a 9 mm eyepiece on Lorenzo, which gave visitors a quite spectacular view of the Moon and the other objects but also meant that I was kept busy making corrections to keep the objects in the field of vision.

We packed up at 21:00 just as the dew was beginning to become problematic. At that stage there were still quite a few people around but with a tally of 1622 visitors on our counters we felt that enough was enough. After packing up we handed over Wendy’s birthday present and went our various ways homeward.

TOP LEFT: As the temperature dropped out came the jackets and coats. Dirk on the left has already got his coat out and Wendy would shortly follow suit. TOP RIGHT: Even after dark our posters still made a good showing. BOTTOM LEFT: The Waterfront is brightly lit at night but the Pierhead is one of the darker areas, which is why we chose it for these outings. BOTTOM RIGHT: Star People and Star Friends. We are minus Dirk, who managed to pack up faster than the rest of us and had already left, and Auke, who took the photo. Alan is handing Wendy her birthday card. She had just turned 21 and a bit!
TOP LEFT: As the temperature dropped out came the jackets and coats. Dirk on the left has already got his coat out and Wendy would shortly follow suit. TOP RIGHT: Even after dark our posters still made a good showing. BOTTOM LEFT: The Waterfront is brightly lit at night but the Pierhead is one of the darker areas, which is why we chose it for these outings. BOTTOM RIGHT: Star People and Star Friends. We are minus Dirk, who managed to pack up faster than the rest of us and had already left, and Auke, who took the photo. Alan is handing Wendy her birthday card. She had just turned 21 and a bit!

On outings like this one always encounters people with odd requests and non-mainstream views and Saturday was no exception. There was one small group that insisted I show them the planet Nibiru and all my diplomatic attempts to convince them of its non-existence came to naught. I eventually resorted to verbal force majeure to get rid of them when they became abusive about my inability to show it to them. This by the way was all in broad daylight! Another gentleman insisted that the telescope was an instrument of the anti-Christ and that Saturn was, in fact, Satan’s seat of power. He eventually wandered of proclaiming to all and sundry that science was actually the anti-Christ not just poor Lorenzo. Lorenzo was relieved.

On Sunday it was all about unpacking and putting all the stuff out to dry before packing everything away again.

For more about this outing please also visit this site here.

Our future dates at the Waterfront can all be found by visiting this site here.

Stargazing at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront: Saturday the 11th June 2016.

When Lynnette and I left Brackenfell the conditions were not all that good for viewing the Sun and we hoped that they would improve during the course of the afternoon and evening. The clouds were thin and patchy so there was some hope.

The striking advertisement for the event which Auke put together and placed on the StarPeople Facebook page as well as other social media.
The striking advertisement for the event which Auke put together and placed on the StarPeople Facebook page as well as other social media.

We had hardly stopped at the Pierhead in the Waterfront when Alan and Rose arrived followed very shortly by Auke and Wendy. Dirk had been delayed and only arrived quite a bit after the rest of us. We set up quickly and got Lorenzo and Maphefu onto the Sun. The high level clouds blurred the image and made it difficult to see the two large sunspots but when the Sun got into a fairly clear patch the image was good. The conditions were not all that pleasant and the cold wind probably reduced the numbers of visitors to the Waterfront because there were definitely fewer passersby than on our previous visit.

TOP LEFT: An image of the Sun from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Through our telescopes the image is white and the two sunspots are black. TOP RIGHT: The Moon image and information Auke had prepared for use on our cell phones but which we never really got the opportunity to use. BOTTOM LEFT: The handouts we gave to the visitors in which details of all our future events at the Pierhead are advertised. BOTTOM RIGHT: Maphefu, the 8-inch Dobsonian, with the cover in place and the shiny solar filter clearly visible.
TOP LEFT: An image of the Sun from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Through our telescopes the image is white and the two sunspots are black. TOP RIGHT: The Moon image and information Auke had prepared for use on our cell phones but which we never really got the opportunity to use. BOTTOM LEFT: The handouts we gave to the visitors in which details of all our future events at the Pierhead are advertised. BOTTOM RIGHT: Maphefu, the 8-inch Dobsonian, with the cover in place and the shiny solar filter clearly visible.

While Wendy and I kept the visitors busy on Lorenzo and Maphefu, Dirk was setting up and Auke and Alan were measuring out the size of the Sun in comparison to the inflatable Earth globes we had brought along. They also used chalk to draw the relative sizes of the planets around the signpost on the Pierhead.

TOP LEFT: Alan running out the tape to determine exactly where the edge of the Sun would be on the scale of our inflatable Earth globes. TOP RIGHT: Alan hard at work preparing the comparison of the plants’ sizes. BOTTOM LEFT: All done so now everyone could see the differences in the sizes. By the shadows one can see that we still had some sun at this stage. BOTTOM RIGHT: Me holding a sign indicating that space is just 100 km straight up compared to the thousands of km for the other destinations depicted on the signpost.
TOP LEFT: Alan running out the tape to determine exactly where the edge of the Sun would be on the scale of our inflatable Earth globes. TOP RIGHT: Alan hard at work preparing the comparison of the plants’ sizes. BOTTOM LEFT: All done so now everyone could see the differences in the sizes. By the shadows one can see that we still had some sun at this stage. BOTTOM RIGHT: Me holding a sign indicating that space is just 100 km straight up compared to the thousands of km for the other destinations depicted on the signpost.
TOP LEFT: Maphefu on the left and Lorenzo (a 10-inch Dobsonian) on the right with me still battling to get the faint Sun in the eyepiece. TOP RIGHT: Visitors viewing the rather fuzzy image of the Sun through Lorenzo. BOTTOM LEFT: Maphefu and Lorenzo in action, but note the hazy sky in the background. These were really not good viewing conditions. BOTTOM RIGHT: Wendy explaining something to a visitor while another visitor looks at the Sun through Maphefu.
TOP LEFT: Maphefu on the left and Lorenzo (a 10-inch Dobsonian) on the right with me still battling to get the faint Sun in the eyepiece. TOP RIGHT: Visitors viewing the rather fuzzy image of the Sun through Lorenzo. BOTTOM LEFT: Maphefu and Lorenzo in action, but note the hazy sky in the background. These were really not good viewing conditions. BOTTOM RIGHT: Wendy explaining something to a visitor while another visitor looks at the Sun through Maphefu.

Lynnette had packed some delicious sandwiches for the two of us, which went down really well. She had also bought a variety of very nice muffins which she shared out to the rest of the crew to have with their coffee. Lynnette also did her usual with the visitors lists when the telescope operators were tied up and operated Lorenzo when I had to do something else. Her skill at finding the Sun with the Dobsonians also came in very handy when Auke, Wendy or I struggled to find it.

The gusty conditions blew the cover off Lorenzo and sent it spinning over the edge of the pier. Fortunately it lodged in a position where Alan could retrieve it. We had two disasters with our inflatable Earth globes. In one case a boy decided to practice his soccer kick on one and broke the tag to which the string for holding it is attached. To the boy’s mother I would like to say that grabbing his hand and hustling him away as if nothing had happened, sets a very bad example to him and shows a regrettable lack of responsibility on your behalf. The same comment applies to the three youths who forcibly dislodged the other Earth globe and then had the temerity to chirp Alan when he went chasing after it to prevent it being blown into the water.

The Moon and Jupiter were visible for brief periods in broad daylight when the clouds parted sufficiently.
The Moon and Jupiter were visible for brief periods in broad daylight when the clouds parted sufficiently.

As time passed the clouds became thicker until we could no longer see the Sun at all and George also lost sight of the Moon. By 17:00 it looked as if we were fighting a losing battle and I had Lorenzo fixed on Lion’s Head giving visitors a clear view of the people sitting and walking around up there. Shortly after 17:30 we decided the weather was not going to clear so we packed up and headed for home.

TOP LEFT: The cloud cover has increased and it has turned very chilly. I am on the left and Auke is on the right and both have put on woollen caps and warm tops. TOP RIGHT: Myself and Lynnette with our backs to the camera and clearly dressed warmly. BOTTOM LEFT: Wendy wearing a coat, scarf and woollen cap speaks to visitors. BOTTOM RIGHT: Lynnette against the background of a grey sea and sky.
TOP LEFT: The cloud cover has increased and it has turned very chilly. I am on the left and Auke is on the right and both have put on woolen caps and warm tops. TOP RIGHT: Myself and Lynnette with our backs to the camera and clearly dressed warmly. BOTTOM LEFT: Wendy wearing a coat, scarf and woolen cap speaks to visitors. BOTTOM RIGHT: Lynnette against the background of a grey sea and sky.
TOP LEFT: Auke and some visitors. Even the visitors are wearing warm tops. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette, Rose, Alan and I all contemplating packing up. BOTTOM LEFT: Dirk decided that if he cannot see anything he might as well watch the Rugby. The result, for South Africa, was as dismal as the weather.
TOP LEFT: Auke and some visitors. Even the visitors are wearing warm tops. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette, Rose, Alan and I all contemplating packing up. BOTTOM LEFT: Dirk decided that if he cannot see anything he might as well watch the Rugby. The result, for South Africa, was as dismal as the weather.

The only consolation was that there had been no dew so Lynnette and I did not have to unpack and dry everything before packing it all away. However, despite the unfavourable conditions we managed to service just under 300 visitors during the course of the afternoon.

We can only hope that the 09th of July, which is when we are scheduled to set up on the Pierhead again, provides us with better viewing conditions.

Stargazing at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront: Saturday 14th May 2016.

Lynnette and I left Brackenfell at about 10:00 under completely overcast skies. It thinned in patches at times, but in general the prospects for viewing the Sun or the Moon, which was due to rise at about 14:00, seemed pretty close to zero.

TOP LEFT: On the N1 heading to the V&A Waterfront for a day’s astronomy outreach. CENTRE LEFT: Look, there’s a patch of blue sky! BOTTOM LEFT: More blue sky and Signal Hill too, we just might be in luck. TOP RIGHT: What does one need for a day’s astronomy outreach in the V&A Waterfront? A lot of stuff! BOTTOM RIGHT: But wait, there’s more up front as well!
TOP LEFT: On the N1 heading to the V&A Waterfront for a day’s astronomy outreach. CENTRE LEFT: Look, there’s a patch of blue sky! BOTTOM LEFT: More blue sky and Signal Hill too, we just might be in luck. TOP RIGHT: What does one need for a day’s astronomy outreach in the V&A Waterfront? A lot of stuff! BOTTOM RIGHT: But wait, there’s more up front as well!

At the Waterfront all the access arrangements made by George Moolman (Manager: Events V&A Waterfront) worked very smoothly. Once we had parked the Vito we inspected the site we had chosen on the Pierhead and decided on a tentative layout for the telescopes, poster A-frames and other paraphernalia associated with outreach events. Auke and Wendy arrived after a while, followed by Dirk. As soon as we had agreed on a final layout we unloaded and took the vehicles back to our allocated parking bays.

By shortly after 13:00 we were ready for action, but our targets were hidden by the clouds so what were we going to show the visitors? People, attracted by the telescopes and posters, approached us to find out what it was all about and we had to explain that we could not show them the Sun or the Moon, as advertised, because of the unrelenting cloud cover. Auke and Dirk got their telescopes [“Walter”, a 5-inch refractor and a 5-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain] lined up on the lower cable station and used the image to talk about how telescopes worked but, despite muttered incantations and explicit and generally unprintable expressions of displeasure, the clouds kept the Sun and the Moon well hidden.

TOP LEFT: Grey water and horizon to horizon grey clouds. CENTRE LEFT: We had come to show visitors the Sun (with some sunspots) and the Moon but ended up aiming the telescopes at all sorts of other things. Lorenzo (10-inch Dobsonian) is just visible at the extreme left and Maphefu (8-inch Dobsonian) in the centre. BOTTOM LEFT: At the slightest hint that the Sun was going to peep through the cloud blanket Wendy, Lynnette and I would scurry to try and get it in our sights. Maphefu is on the left Lorenzo just left of the centre, Walther (5-inch refractor) on the tripod just right of centre and Dirk’s 5-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain, also on a tripod on the far right. TOP RIGHT: Wendy watching the clouds as they alternately show and hide the Moon from view. Dirk’s telescope with the moon visible on the small screen and Maphefu on the far right. BOTTOM RIGHT: Walther next to a small group of visitors gathered around Auke, with Maphefu in the foreground and a bit of almost-blue sky in the background.
TOP LEFT: Grey water and horizon to horizon grey clouds. CENTRE LEFT: We had come to show visitors the Sun (with some sunspots) and the Moon but ended up aiming the telescopes at all sorts of other things. Lorenzo (10-inch Dobsonian) is just visible at the extreme left and Maphefu (8-inch Dobsonian) in the centre. BOTTOM LEFT: At the slightest hint that the Sun was going to peep through the cloud blanket Wendy, Lynnette and I would scurry to try and get it in our sights. Maphefu is on the left Lorenzo just left of the centre, Walter (5-inch refractor) on the tripod just right of centre and Dirk’s 5-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain, also on a tripod on the far right. TOP RIGHT: Wendy watching the clouds as they alternately show and hide the Moon from view. Dirk’s telescope with the moon visible on the small screen and Maphefu on the far right. BOTTOM RIGHT: Walter next to a small group of visitors gathered around Auke, with Maphefu in the foreground and a bit of almost-blue sky in the background

As the afternoon wore on the clouds began to thin and we were allowed fleeting glimpses of the Sun. Every time this happened there was a flurry of activity as Lynnette, Wendy and I attempted to get “Maphefu” (8-inch Dobsonian) and “Lorenzo” (10-inch Dobsonian) aligned on the Sun only to have the clouds maliciously close in just as we almost had it in our sights. Then, finally, at about 16:30, the clouds parted and we could actually see both the Sun and the Moon. Maphefu and Lorenzo were equipped with solar filters, so Wendy and I could show visitors the Sun and some very nice sun spots, while Auke and Dirk concentrated on the Moon. When the Sun set behind the Ferris-Wheel I switched Lorenzo to the Moon and, as soon as it became dark enough to see Jupiter, I switched targets again.

TOP LEFT: Lynnette and I with Lorenzo, with cover on, is pointing straight up at the grey cloud cover. TOP RIGHT: Were Dirk and I swopping fishing or astronomy stories? BOTTOM LEFT: The Moon became visible and Dirk’s telescope (image on the small screen) and Wendy (with Maphefu) were quick to show it to visitors. BOTTOM CENTRE: Auke reading the cards and looking for some weather inspiration. BOTTOM RIGHT: All gone again so the lid goes back on Lorenzo and Auke uses his cards to amuse a young visitor while Walter stands idle on his tripod.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette and I with Lorenzo, with cover on, is pointing straight up at the grey cloud cover. TOP RIGHT: Were Dirk and I swapping fishing or astronomy stories? BOTTOM LEFT: The Moon became visible and Dirk’s telescope (image on the small screen) and Wendy (with Maphefu) were quick to show it to visitors. BOTTOM CENTRE: Auke reading the cards and looking for some weather inspiration. BOTTOM RIGHT: All gone again so the lid goes back on Lorenzo and Auke uses his cards to amuse a young visitor while Walter stands idle on his tripod.

For most of the rest of the evening I kept Lorenzo on Jupiter while Wendy, Auke and Dirk focused on the Moon. By 20:00 dew was becoming a problem and it became evident that we would have to consider packing up. Mars was very bright and eventually Saturn and Antares also became visible as they climbed high enough to escape the effects of the light pollution glare over the harbour. Crux and the Pointers were visible all evening as were Sirius and Canopus. By about 21:00 the dew definitely had the upper hand so we had to pack away and load all the wet telescopes and other stuff into the vehicles and head for home.

TOP LEFT: Dirk and I looking quite pleased about the fact that the clouds were considering clearing. TOP RIGHT: The sky had cleared by nightfall and we could show visitors Jupiter, the Moon, Mars, Saturn, Antares, Crux and the Ferris-Wheel. BOTTOM LEFT: The brightly lit Swing Bridge. BOTTOM RIGHT: Packing everything, back into the Vito and complaining about the very heavy dew.
TOP LEFT: Dirk and I looking quite pleased about the fact that the clouds were considering clearing. TOP RIGHT: The sky had cleared by nightfall and we could show visitors Jupiter, the Moon, Mars, Saturn, Antares, Crux and the Ferris-Wheel. BOTTOM LEFT: The brightly lit Swing Bridge. BOTTOM RIGHT: Packing everything, back into the Vito and complaining about the very heavy dew.

Obtaining an accurate count of the number of visitors was, as is usual, quite tricky because one has to be careful not to count the same people at each of the four telescopes. Lynnette and I both had counters and we counted just over 400 visitors, but our count is usually a bit low and the actual figure could be closer to five hundred. We also asked visitors to sign our visitors list and collected 282 names, which is definitely less than the number of visitors we had. It is surprisingly tricky to get people to sign the lists. Some people just flatly refuse and the telescope operators find it difficult to work a telescope, explain things to people and collect names and signatures at the same time.

All in all the afternoon and evening were quite successful despite the clouds. Many of the visitors also showed considerable interest in our poster display and quite a few promised to return in June when we will be set up again on the Pierhead, hopefully without clouds. Our dates for astronomy on the Pierhead at the V&A Waterfront, weather permitting, are;

Saturday, June 11th. / Saturday, July 9th. / Saturday, August 20th. / Saturday, September 10th. / Saturday, October 8th. / Saturday, November 5th. / Saturday, December 10th.

The next day all the wet things we had loaded into the Vito at the Waterfront had to be dried before we could pack them away. Banners had to be unrolled, chairs and tables taken out of their bags, A-frames unfolded and eyepieces and finder scopes inspected for signs of moisture. Even our folders with the laminated A3-posters had to be taken out of the sleeves and individually dried.

TOP LEFT: Tables & chairs, taken out of their covers to dry. CENTRE LEFT: Banners unrolled to dry out. BOTTOM LEFT: A-frame poster boards unfolded to dry before packing away. TOP RIGHT: This lot under the car port is dry and ready to be packed away, till next time. BOTTOM RIGHT: All the A3-laminated material had to be removed from the sleeves and individually dried before packing away.
TOP LEFT: Tables & chairs, taken out of their covers to dry. CENTRE LEFT: Banners unrolled to dry out. BOTTOM LEFT: A-frame poster boards unfolded to dry before packing away. TOP RIGHT: This lot under the car port is dry and ready to be packed away, till next time. BOTTOM RIGHT: All the A3-laminated material had to be removed from the sleeves and individually dried before packing away.