Norwegian Tour: Tuesday 03rd of January to Sunday 15th January 2017.

Lynnette, Snorre and I had just returned from Leeuwenboschfontein so everything was a bit rushed but finally the big day had arrived; Anton, Camilla, Viljé, Birk and Anton’s in-laws were finally due to arrive. We had been looking forward to this visit for a long time and it felt as if they took ages to eventually appear in the arrival hall at Cape Town International. When they eventually did arrive there was so much excitement that nobody took any photographs!  Anyway, we got them to the Kolping Guest House in Durbanville safely after making a detour to our place first because the visitors wanted to see where we lived. We let them take it easy for the rest of the day and on Wednesday we went over the tour itinerary for the rest of their stay.

Thursday the 05th of January we set off bright and early for our 08:30 appointment at Sadie Family Wines in the Aprilskloof on the north-western slopes of the Paardeberg. The winery is situated in the Swartland region and the closest town is Malmesbury. Access to the venue is via unsurfaced roads, which the Vito does not like. We were met by Christine who handed us over to Paul for a most instructive tour of the cellar followed by a well-presented wine tasting. Eden Sadie, the driving force behind Sadie Wines is considered by many to be the enfant terrible of the new generation of Swartland wine architects. He was previously the winemaker during the development of the Spice Route wines at Fairview. His return to grass roots winemaking and the extensive, almost exclusive use of decades old, previously neglected bush vine vineyards to make exceptional wines has caused quite a stir. Most of these vineyards are a long way from the winery too and some are also ungrafted vines which is very unusual considering the fact that grafting pulled the South African wine industry back from the brink of total collapse during the Phylloxera in the late 19th century.

TOP LEFT: The start of the tour and we are all gathered in the shade of a convenient tree to listen to Paul. TOP CENTRE: The oldest building on the property, where it all started. TOP RIGHT: Huge earthenware vats, reminiscent of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves. CENTRE: The Sadie company logo. BOTTOM LEFT: The delightfully cool maturation cellar. BOTTOM CENTRE: We invade the maturation cellar in search of knowledge and lower temperatures. BOTTOM RIGHT: The group enjoys the lower temperature in the cellar because outside it would hit the low 40’s later in the day.
TOP LEFT: The start of the tour and we are all gathered in the shade of a convenient tree to listen to Paul. TOP CENTRE: The oldest building on the property, where it all started. TOP RIGHT: Huge earthenware vats, reminiscent of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves. CENTRE: The Sadie company logo. BOTTOM LEFT: The delightfully cool maturation cellar. BOTTOM CENTRE: We invade the maturation cellar in search of knowledge and lower temperatures. BOTTOM RIGHT: The group enjoys the lower temperature in the cellar because outside it would hit the low 40’s later in the day.
TOP LEFT: Tasting in progress. TOP RIGHT: Tasting requires concentration especially for wines of this high quality. CENTRE: The range of Old Vineyard wines; really something very special. BOTTOM LEFT: The Columella is in a class of its own. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mev Kirsten might be from octogenarian bush vines but she outdoes the younger competitors
TOP LEFT: Tasting in progress. TOP RIGHT: Tasting requires concentration especially for wines of this high quality. CENTRE: The range of Old Vineyard wines; really something very special. BOTTOM LEFT: The Columella is in a class of its own. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mev Kirsten might be from octogenarian bush vines but she outdoes the younger competition with consummate ease.

Next up was Lammershoek, which is quite literally just around the corner from Sadie. In fact, the Sadie setup is on a small piece of property originally purchased from Lammershoek. At Lammershoek Zaine was waiting for us. He first conducted a comprehensive and informative tasting, which included a brief history of Lammershoek and an explanation of the objectives of the new management. After the tasting, he took us on a tour of the cellar. Lammershoek has undergone considerable changes since the introduction of overseas capital in a project spearheaded by German football legend Franz Beckenbauer. Despite all the new innovations and increased capital flow their wines are good but not yet in the same class as those of their much smaller next door neighbour.

TOP LEFT: Lammershoek under the guidance of Franz Beckenbauer is on a new track. TOP RIGHT: The tasting commences in a nice new, modern tasting room. CENTRE: Part of the revamped cellar at Lammershoek. BOTTOM LEFT: The fermentation cellar with its epoxy lined open concrete fermentation vats. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Lynnette busy with an open air language instruction class.
TOP LEFT: Lammershoek under the guidance of Franz Beckenbauer is on a new track. TOP RIGHT: The tasting commences in a nice new, modern tasting room. CENTRE: Part of the revamped cellar at Lammershoek. BOTTOM LEFT: The fermentation cellar with its epoxy lined open concrete fermentation vats. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Lynnette busy with an open air language instruction class.

After Lammershoek we were off to Porseleinberg and Callie Louw and that proved to be quite an expedition, over roads that I would normally not have taken the Vito on. The setting of this small winery on top of the Porseleinberg, amid vineyards belonging to Boekenhoutskloof in Franschhoek, is spectacular with 360-degree panoramic views over the Swartland. The wines were as spectacular as the view, if not more so, and Callie’s laid-back style of presentation belies his deep appreciation of wine and knowledge of wine crafting.

TOP LEFT: A very nice piece of polished schist inscribed with the Porseleinberg name but displayed in the Boekenhoutskloof cellars in Franschhoek. CENTRE LEFT: In the cellar which just seems far too small for such a big wine. BOTTOM LEFT: A vertical tasting of several vintages of this exceptional wine led by Callie Louw in person. TOP RIGHT: The Young Guns who have upended winemaking in the Swartland – Callie Louw, Eben Sadie, Addie Badenhorst and Chris & Andrea Mullineux, depicted in 2012. BOTTOM RIGHT: The same crew on display in 2013.
TOP LEFT: A very nice piece of polished schist inscribed with the Porseleinberg name but displayed in the Boekenhoutskloof cellars in Franschhoek. CENTRE LEFT: In the cellar which just seems far too small for such a big wine. BOTTOM LEFT: A vertical tasting of several vintages of this exceptional wine led by Callie Louw in person. TOP RIGHT: The Young Guns who have upended winemaking in the Swartland – Callie Louw, Eben Sadie, Addie Badenhorst and Chris & Andrea Mullineux, depicted in 2012. BOTTOM RIGHT: The same crew on display in 2013.

An interesting fact and one which is suitable for deep discussions over a bottle of one these excellent wines is the fact that Eben Sadie, Callie Louw and Addie Badenhorst of Badenhorst Family Wines on Kalmoesfontein, where we regrettably did not visit, were all keen surfers in their younger days. I believe Eben at one stage actually considered making it a career choice.

Our next stop, after negotiating the daunting gravel road back to the tarred road near Hermon, was at the established and well known Allesverloren wine estate in Riebeeck West.  We first had a late lunch as everyone was more than just a bit peckish at this stage. Lunch was good but the red wines and presentation of the tasting were both a bit of a letdown. The dessert wines, however, were excellent. After the tasting, we returned to the guest house with everyone feeling that Thursday had been a long day.

Friday the 5th saw us make an early start for Hartenberg in the Bottelary area west of Stellenbosch.  There we had a most enjoyable cheese board and light snacks followed by an informative and well-presented tasting of their excellent wines. Hartenberg is probably one of the nicest wineries to visit and the grounds are so well maintained too. Their wines are excellent as well, which makes every visit doubly rewarding. We enjoyed the visit so much that we completely forgot to take any pictures! It is just such a pity they uprooted that Pontac bush vine vineyard of theirs some years ago, such a pity.

Our next stop was for a Fairview Master Tasting, which is always a winner. Good wines, some actually excellent and all very well presented in the tasting by properly trained staff; jolly good show Fairview. From Fairview, we nipped next door to do the Spice Route Lunch and tasting.  The wines were definitely a disappointment after Fairview and they were also presented in a very slap-dash manner which did nothing to enhance the quality of either the wine or the general experience. After the Spice Route, back to the guest house, we all went.

TOP LEFT: Anton, Birk and Viljé. TOP RIGHT: In the tasting room for the Master Tasting at Fairview. CENTRE: The view from the restaurant at Allesverloren across the wheat fields and vineyards toward Gouda, Saron and Nieuwekloof Pass. BOTTOM LEFT: A Mad max type vehicle at Fairview. BOTTOM RIGHT: Gathered for lunch at the Spice Route.
TOP LEFT: Anton, Birk and Viljé. TOP RIGHT: In the tasting room for the Master Tasting at Fairview. CENTRE: The view from the restaurant at Allesverloren across the wheat fields and vineyards toward Gouda, Saron and Nieuwekloof Pass. BOTTOM LEFT: A Mad max type vehicle at Fairview. BOTTOM RIGHT: Gathered for lunch at the Spice Route.

On Saturday the 7th we tackled the V&A Waterfront and the Two Oceans Aquarium followed by supper at Den Anker serviced as usual by the impeccable Patrick.

TOP LEFT: Meal at Colcachio in the Willowbridge Centre with Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda and Harald. TOP RIGHT: Anton and Birk. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé and Birk in the V&A shopping centre. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Birk get all the attention from Harald, Anton and Lynnette. BOTTOM CENTRE: At Den Anker in the V&A waterfront with Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda, Edward and Anton. BOTTOM LEFT: A deep-sea salvage vessel in the Robinson Dry Dock in the Alfred Basin. It was built in 1882 and is the oldest functional dry dock of this type in use anywhere in the world.
TOP LEFT: Meal at Colcachio in the Willowbridge Centre with Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda and Harald. TOP RIGHT: Anton and Birk. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé and Birk in the V&A shopping centre. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Birk get all the attention from Harald, Anton and Lynnette. BOTTOM CENTRE: At Den Anker in the V&A waterfront with Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda, Edward and Anton. BOTTOM LEFT: A deep-sea salvage vessel in the Robinson Dry Dock in the Alfred Basin. It was built in 1882 and is the oldest functional dry dock of this type in use anywhere in the world.

Sunday the 8th Lynnette and I prepared a meal which we took to the guest house and enjoyed there. We were joined for the occasion by Lenelle and Susan.

TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lynda arrange the spread Lynnette and I prepared for Sunday lunch at Kolping. CENTRE LEFT: Camilla, Anton, Harald, Lenelle, Susan and Lynnette with her back to the camera. BOTTOM LEFT: Yummy! TOP RIGHT: Anton, Lenelle, Susan, and Viljé. BOTTOM RIGHT: At Orca we have Camilla, Linda hidden behind her, Erland, Harald, Anton, and Viljé with her back to the Camera and Birk’s head just showing at the bottom of the photograph.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lynda arrange the spread Lynnette and I prepared for Sunday lunch at Kolping. CENTRE LEFT: Camilla, Anton, Harald, Lenelle, Susan and Lynnette with her back to the camera. BOTTOM LEFT: Yummy! TOP RIGHT: Anton, Lenelle, Susan, and Viljé. BOTTOM RIGHT: At Orca we have Camilla, Linda hidden behind her, Erland, Harald, Anton, and Viljé with her back to the Camera and Birk’s head just showing at the bottom of the photograph.

On Monday the 09th we were off to Stellenbosch where we started the day at Reynecke Wines. Their organic policy always creates an interesting discussion with visitors and our visit was no exception. Their wines were interesting, some very good in fact and the presentation by Nuschka was one of the best and most professional we encountered on our various visits.

From Reynecke we nipped around the corner to De Toren.  Here the wine crafter, Charles Williams was personally on hand to take us on the tour.  He started in the vineyard explaining their vineyard policy and them we toured the cellar before ending up in the very cosy little tasting room. The tasting was well presented and the tour was very informative and professionally conducted but, although the wines were good they were not really outstanding. After De Toren, we went to Skilpadvlei, which is just down the road, for lunch.

After lunch, we visited Raats Family Wines with great expectations. Unfortunately, the tasting was a bit of a disappointment.  The wines were not well presented and some of them seemed to have been open quite a while. It is really a pity that a presenter, who seems otherwise to be a very informed person, does not take the trouble to ensure that a tasting is properly presented. A sloppy tasting definitely detracts from the quality of the wines even if they are good or even excellent ones.  After Raats we made a beeline for home to rest up for the next day’s wine tasting.

TOP LEFT: Very well presented tasting with Nuschka at Reynecke Wines. TOP CENTRE: A short talk outside with Charles Williams before going into the cellar at De Toren. TOP RIGHT: Inside the lovely cool cellar with its delicious wine aromas at De Toren. CENTRE: Lunch at Skilpadvlei. BOTTOM LEFT: Maturation cellar at de Toren. BOTTOM CENTRE: Tasting at De Toren. BOTTOM RIGHT: Tasting at Raats Family winery.
TOP LEFT: Very well presented tasting with Nuschka at Reynecke Wines. TOP CENTRE: A short talk outside with Charles Williams before going into the cellar at De Toren. TOP RIGHT: Inside the lovely cool cellar with its delicious wine aromas at De Toren. CENTRE: Lunch at Skilpadvlei. BOTTOM LEFT: Maturation cellar at de Toren. BOTTOM CENTRE: Tasting at De Toren. BOTTOM RIGHT: Tasting at Raats Family winery.

Tuesday the 10th saw us back in the Stellenbosch area and our trip started at the well respected Kanonkop estate. Lynnette and I, being the designated drivers, stayed outside while the rest of the crew went inside to do the tasting. The tasting was apparently a bit of a disappointment because it is very commercialized.  One apparently has to have at least ten people for a proper tasting but we were not informed about this when we phoned to make our reservation and that is simply slipshod administration. Nevertheless, their wines are good, in fact very good but the overall impression would have been better with a more personalized tasting for our overseas visitors.

TOP LEFT: Standing tasting at Kanonkop. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette with Viljé and Birk under the oaks at Kanonkop. BOTTOM: Serious concentration for the tasters.
TOP LEFT: Standing tasting at Kanonkop. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette with Viljé and Birk under the oaks at Kanonkop. BOTTOM: Serious concentration for the tasters.

After Kanonkop we drove to Beyerskloof, who regard themselves as the Pinotage Kings, for a tasting and lunch. The tasting had the same problem as the one at Kanonkop and here to we had not been told of any other arrangements that we could have made when we phoned to inquire about the tastings. Their wines are good and some are excellent but our guests would really like to have done the tasting blind in a separate tasting area.

TOP: Beyerskloof restaurant from the parking area. BOTTOM LEFT: For those with surplus cash here is one way to spend it, buy a Mendelazar of Beyerskloof Pinotage. BOTTOM RIGHT: The tasters and Lynnette with Birk in the stroller. Here one can see that, like at Kanonkop, one tastes in an open public area.
TOP: Beyerskloof restaurant from the parking area. BOTTOM LEFT: For those with surplus cash here is one way to spend it, buy a Mendelazar of Beyerskloof Pinotage. BOTTOM RIGHT: The tasters and Lynnette with Birk in the stroller. Here one can see that, like at Kanonkop, one tastes in an open public area.

After lunch, the party split up and one group, driven by Lynnette, went looking for diamonds in Stellenbosch while the second group headed for Tokara to taste more wines.  Tokara is a very impressive venue but, as I have experienced before, their tasting presentation is really not up to standard. A tasting where someone slops the wine into your glass then races through a memorized bit of information, spins around and marches off before you have had time to even taste the wine is not a tasting, it is a farce. Add to this the fact that their wines are not as good as they would like to believe they are and Tokara was a disappointment.  After Tokara, we picked up the rest of the party in Stellenbosch and headed for home.

Wednesday the 11th the group did a township tour with Imvuyo Township Tours & Chippa Mbuyiseli Mngangwa.  The group were ecstatic about his punctuality and service delivery. Good work Chippa, I will certainly use you again. Later that afternoon we went to Orca in Melkbos for supper and that was, as always, a worthwhile experience.

Franschhoek was the destination for Anton Erland and I on Thursday the 12th while Lynnette took the ladies to Cape Town where they wanted to do some serious shopping. The first stop in Franschhoek was Boekenhoutskloof, the umbrella company for Porseleinberg.  What a difference though! The place is all glitz, glass and glamour and makes Porseleinberg look like a pauper’s digs. However, their wine quality does not come close to that of Porseleinberg. Some of it is good but the guests did not think there was anything outstanding.

TOP LEFT: The impressive tasting room at Boekenhoutskloof. TOP CENTRE: The serious business of actually deciding which wine to buy. TOP RIGHT: The old mud and stone walls of the cellar. Note the holes drilled by the wasps to hide the caterpillars and spiders they catch as food for the still to be hatched young. BOTTOM: This door leaves no doubt as to where you are.
TOP LEFT: The impressive tasting room at Boekenhoutskloof. TOP CENTRE: The serious business of actually deciding which wine to buy. TOP RIGHT: The old mud and stone walls of the cellar. Note the holes drilled by the wasps to hide the caterpillars and spiders they catch as food for the still to be hatched young. BOTTOM: This door leaves no doubt as to where you are.

Next stop was Haute Cabriére at the foot of the Franschhoek Pass. The tasting was presented in very much the same fashion as the one at Tokara, perhaps a little better, and the wines were good but lackluster with nothing to write home about. After this disappointment, we headed for Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines with high hopes. On arrival, it was clear that this place has money and spends it. The tasting emporium is impressive and the attention very personal. Lizzie, the presenter, was informative and knowledgeable about a wide range of topics related to the wines we tasted. It might seem like nit-picking, but the amount given to taste was really minuscule compared to all the other tasting we had attended and the speed with which the bottles were whisked away, clearly indicated that there was no chance of tasting anything a second time. Considering that this was one of the more expensive tastings this skimpiness is inexplicable.

TOP LEFT: Anton, Erland and Harald, tasting at Tokara, probably the least professionally presented tasting we had. TOP RIGHT: The tasting and wine purchase area at Tokara. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton and Erland outside Haut Cabriére with which they were also unimpressed. BOTTOM RIGHT: Erland and Anton outside the imposing entrance to the Mullineux Leeu wine emporium in Franschhoek.
TOP LEFT: Anton, Erland and Harald, tasting at Tokara, probably the least professionally presented tasting we had. TOP RIGHT: The tasting and wine purchase area at Tokara. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton and Erland outside Haut Cabriére with which they were also unimpressed. BOTTOM RIGHT: Erland and Anton outside the imposing entrance to the Mullineux Leeu wine emporium in Franschhoek.

After Mullineux and Leeu we were off to La Motte, making it just before closing time. Unfortunately, the proximity to closing time seemed to also have affected the tasting session. It was rushed to the point of being rude and the wines were a disappointment too. If you take somebody’s money for a tasting then, irrespective of how close it is to closing time, the person is entitled to the same quality tasting experience as somebody who rocked up two hours earlier. The highlight of the visit was the bright yellow Ferrari in the parking area; what a machine! We drove home with mixed feelings about Franschhoek and its wines.

Friday the 13th was Anton’s birthday and we started that off with a surprise birthday breakfast at Kolping Guest House and ended the day with a dinner at the Cattle Baron in the Tygervalley Waterfront.

TOP LEFT: The dining hall at Kolping set up for Anton’s 40th birthday. TOP CENTRE: The menu for the birthday breakfast. TOP RIGHT: Charmain’s cupcakes. BOTTOM: Cupcakes on display.
TOP LEFT: The dining hall at Kolping set up for Anton’s 40th birthday. TOP CENTRE: The menu for the birthday breakfast. TOP RIGHT: Charmain’s cupcakes. BOTTOM: Cupcakes on display.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette, Erland, Lynda, Petro, Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. TOP RIGHT: Harald and Anne-Kirsten. BOTTOM LEFT: Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Lynnette, Erland and Linda.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette, Erland, Lynda, Petro, Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. TOP RIGHT: Harald and Anne-Kirsten. BOTTOM LEFT: Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Lynnette, Erland and Linda.
TOP LEFT: Harald, Birk and Anton Viljé (only her head) and Camilla. TOP RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lenelle, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and Lynnette (back to the camera). CENTRE: Group photo taken by Susan, Front from left to right: Ansie, Viljé, Ma Peggy, Petro, Nadine, 2nd Row from left to right: Linda, Anne-Kirsten, Birk, Camilla, Lynnette, Edward, Lenelle, Back from left to right: Erland, Harald, Anton, Deon, Peter. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton, Birk, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Petro, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy (hidden) and Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lynnette, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Anton, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy, Edward, Birk.
TOP LEFT: Harald, Birk and Anton Viljé (only her head) and Camilla. TOP RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lenelle, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and Lynnette (back to the camera). CENTRE: Group photo taken by Susan, Front from left to right: Ansie, Viljé, Ma Peggy, Petro, Nadine, 2nd Row from left to right: Linda, Anne-Kirsten, Birk, Camilla, Lynnette, Edward, Lenelle, Back from left to right: Erland, Harald, Anton, Deon, Peter. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton, Birk, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Petro, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy (hidden) and Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lynnette, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Anton, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy, Edward, Birk.

On Saturday the 14th we went on a short tour of the Peninsula which included only Boulders and Cape Point. At Cape Point, some members of the party walked up to the lighthouse and after that, we drove down to the Cape of Good Hope before going home. Judging by the subdued appearance of the group it looked as if the pace was starting to take its toll

TOP: Anne-Kirsten and Harald make their way down the boardwalk toward the entrance of the Boulders penguin area. 2nd FROM TOP: Waiting for the tickets are Anton, Lynnette, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and over on the far right are Erland and Linda. 2ND FROM BOTTOM: Looking over Simons Bay and False Bay toward Muizenberg. BOTTOM: Penguins, penguins and yet more penguins spread across the beach at Boulders.
TOP: Anne-Kirsten and Harald make their way down the boardwalk toward the entrance of the Boulders penguin area. 2nd FROM TOP: Waiting for the tickets are Anton, Lynnette, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and over on the far right are Erland and Linda. 2ND FROM BOTTOM: Looking over Simons Bay and False Bay toward Muizenberg. BOTTOM: Penguins, penguins and yet more penguins spread across the beach at Boulders.
LEFT: Erland and Linda, TOP RIGHT: Anton and Viljé at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé investigating the marine fauna. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Anne-Kirsten and a uncooperative Birk at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula.
LEFT: Erland and Linda, TOP RIGHT: Anton and Viljé at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé investigating the marine fauna. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Anne-Kirsten and an uncooperative Birk at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula.

On Sunday the 15th Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Erland and Linda departed for Gauteng from where they would head for the Kruger National Park and spend three days there before flying home to Norway.

TOP: Erland, Linda, Anne-Kirsten and Harald at the Cape Town International Airport prior to departure for Oliver Tambo in Gauteng on their way to the Kruger National Park BOTTOM Last minute selfies and messages before embarking with Harald partially decapitated.
TOP: Erland, Linda, Anne-Kirsten and Harald at the Cape Town International Airport prior to departure for Oliver Tambo in Gauteng on their way to the Kruger National Park BOTTOM: Last minute selfies and messages before embarking with Harald partially decapitated.