Leeuwenboschfontein Astronomy Weekend: 11 December 2015.

On Wednesday the 09th we set off for Leeuwenboschfontein (visit their website to by clicking here) within minutes of our scheduled departure time. We were quite chuffed, online as we do not often manage to meet our departure deadlines for trips like this. We stopped off at Die Veldskoen Padstal (visit their Facebook page by clicking here) about 4 km north of De Doorns for a light lunch, prescription buying a few bottles of wine and a bag of fresh cherries. For good, friendly service and quality food I can really recommend this place.  We have been stopping off there since 2008 and not been disappointed once. At Leeuwenboschfontein we found that the permanent caravans had been nicely enclosed to afford privacy and protection against the wind which often becomes quite chilly in the evenings.

Willem and Iain were already camped on site, Alan and Rose arrived on Thursday and moved into the second permanent caravan, followed by Barry and Miemie who occupied Dalzicht guest house. Johan, Nellie and Dominique moved into the third caravan on Friday and Auke, Chris, Lenelle and Susan, all camping, also arrived during the course of Friday. Joan, who runs the reception at Leeuwenboschfontein, was kind enough to lend us a deepfreeze for the campers to use over the weekend, which was very useful.

TOP LEFT: Sunrise at Leeuwenboschfontein looking down the Nougaskloof roughly in the direction of the Anysberg which lies to the right but out of the picture. TOP RIGHT: Sunset, but looking east from Leeuwenboschfontein. BOTTOM LEFT: The same sunset as in the previous photograph but looking west from the camping area. BOTTOM RIGHT: The same sunset reflected in the dam in the campsite at Leeuwenboschfontein.
TOP LEFT: Sunrise at Leeuwenboschfontein looking down the Nougaskloof roughly in the direction of the Anysberg which lies to the right but out of the picture. TOP RIGHT: Sunset, but looking east from Leeuwenboschfontein. BOTTOM LEFT: The same sunset as in the previous photograph but looking west from the camping area. BOTTOM RIGHT: The same sunset reflected in the dam in the campsite at Leeuwenboschfontein.
TOP LEFT: The very neatly and sensibly enclosed permanent caravan sites at Leeuwenboschfontein with the two telescopes under their shiny protective wraps. TOP RIGHT: The handy table with power outlet and light behind the shade cloth screen very nicely extend ones living space from inside the caravan to the space in front and the shade cloth affords on a great deal privacy as well as protection from the prevailing wind. BOTTOM LEFT: The tranquil sunset view across the dam from our caravan. BOTTOM RIGHT: The 12” being prepared for the night’s working session.
TOP LEFT: The very neatly and sensibly enclosed permanent caravan sites at Leeuwenboschfontein with the two telescopes under their shiny protective wraps. TOP RIGHT: The handy table with power outlet and light behind the shade cloth screen very nicely extend ones living space from inside the caravan to the space in front and the shade cloth affords one a great deal privacy as well as protection from the prevailing wind. BOTTOM LEFT: The tranquil sunset view across the dam from our caravan. BOTTOM RIGHT: The 12” being prepared for the night’s working session.

Thursday evening everyone socialized at our caravan but the evening was also very good from an astronomy point of view with excellent seeing conditions. Rose and Lynnette went to bed shortly after midnight but Alan persevered until around 02:00. Barry also put in some time with the telescope and camera and, amongst other things produced a beautiful shot of the Tarantula Nebula (NGC 2070 or 30 Doradus). I was up until just before 06:00.

Friday evening saw more socializing in the late afternoon and early evening with the telescope work taking place later on and after midnight. The seeing was very good. Early on Auke and Barry remarked that one could walk away from the group around the fires and, without too much effort and hardly any dark adaptation, see 47 Tucanae (NGC 104), Omega Centauri (NGC 5139), the Jewel Box (NGC 4755), Eta Carinae, the Southern Pleiades (IC 2602) and the Andromeda Galaxy (M31/NGC 224).

Readings were taken with the Unihedron Sky Quality Meter (visit their website by clicking here to find out more) on the 09th, 10th & 11th and the average of 20 readings on each night was 21.70, 21.69 & 21.58 (Magnitudes per Square Arc-Second or MSAS) respectively. This converts NELM (Naked Eye Limiting Magnitude) values of 6.4816, 6.4772 & 6.4168. Using the Loss of the Night application and viewing 30 stars, at the same time as taking the Sky Quality readings, gave a limiting magnitude of >5 ± 0.1 on all three occasions.

Snorre, with his flashing red light. He seems exceptionally at home in the rocky and bushy terrain at Leeuwenboschfontein and tends to disappear at night. With the light we can find him more easily and we think that it not only affords him some protection against predators, but also warns his potential prey of his approach, much to his disgust.
Snorre, with his flashing red light. He seems exceptionally at home in the rocky and bushy terrain at Leeuwenboschfontein and tends to disappear at night. With the light we can find him more easily and we think that it not only affords him some protection against predators, but also warns his potential prey of his approach, much to his disgust.
TOP LEFT: Auke and Chris in a pensive mood. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette, Rose and Alan. BOTTOM LEFT: Lenelle with her back to the camera, Nellie, Auke, Chris and Miemie. BOTTOM RIGHT: Chris, Lenelle, Miemie just visible, Johan with his back to the camera, Barry, Lynnette, Alan sitting on his haunches with his back to the camera and Rose. On the table is the bottle of sparkling wine to celebrate Alan and Rose’s anniversary.
TOP LEFT: Auke and Chris in a pensive mood. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette, Rose and Alan. BOTTOM LEFT: Lenelle with her back to the camera, Nellie, Auke, Chris and Miemie. BOTTOM RIGHT: Chris, Lenelle, Miemie just visible, Johan with his back to the camera, Barry, Lynnette, Alan sitting on his haunches with his back to the camera and Rose. On the table is the bottle of sparkling wine to celebrate Alan and Rose’s anniversary.
TOP: Nellie, Johan again with his back to the camera, Lenell, Chris, Mienie, Barry, Lynnette, Alan and Rose. BOTTOM: Auke, Nellie with her back to the camera, Chris, Miemie, Barry, Lenelle Susan with her posterior to the camera and Lynnette.
TOP: Nellie, Johan again with his back to the camera, Lenelle, Chris, Miemie, Barry, Lynnette, Alan and Rose. BOTTOM: Auke, Nellie with her back to the camera, Chris, Miemie, Barry, Lenelle Susan with her posterior to the camera and Lynnette.

On Saturday the weather closed in and light rain fell so observing was out as was the customary braai under the stars. Fortunately Leeuwenboschfontein has a very nice enclosed central lapa for just such occasions. We spent a pleasant evening there, out of the wind and rain and warmed by the braai-fires. Alan opened a bottle of sparkling wine to celebrate he and Rose’s wedding anniversary, which was the following day, so it really was a festive occasion. Later in the evening Snorre managed to attract a lot of attention by climbing a tree that proved difficult to get out of but, once everybody had stopped making a fuss, he did what cats normally do; climbed down on his own.

Supper on the grill on Saturday evening in the boma.
Supper on the grill on Saturday evening in the boma.
LEFT: Auke checking out the weather and contemplating the pile of calendars waiting for him at home. RIGHT: Miemie and Barry.
LEFT: Auke checking out the weather and contemplating the pile of calendars waiting for him at home. RIGHT: Miemie and Barry.

Sunday was overcast too, but most people had planned to leave on Sunday in any case. Chris left early, followed by Johan, Nellie and Dominique and then Lenelle and Susan.  Alan and Rosemary left just after lunch and Auke, who had intended staying until Tuesday, also decided to leave because the weather forecast did not look promising, from an astronomical point of view, for the next two evenings. In any case he had a pile of calendars to pack. Before Auke left we looked over the facilities being prepared in the large shed adjacent to De Oude Opstal guest house and they look very promising indeed. With only Willem, Iain, Lynnette, Snorre and I in the camp and Barry and Miemie in Dalzicht Leeuwenbosch was suddenly very quiet. On Monday Barry, Miemie and the Fosters packed up, said goodbye to Joan and to Leeuwenboschfontein and left the camp to Iain and Willem.

TOP: Crux or the Southern Cross is the smallest of the 88 constellations but other than Orion and Scorpius it is probably one of the most distinctive. Two of the stars in Crux appear to have planets and it also contains the distinctive open cluster known as the Jewel Box (NGC 4755) as well as the extensive dark nebulae known as the Coal Sack. Camera: Nikon D5100, Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1,8G, ISO: 1000, Shutter: 5s – f/1.8, 30 photographs stacked and processed with PhotoScape ® BOTTOM: Star trails in the vicinity of Orion. Legend: M1 to M4 are meteor trails and A is the tremor caused by our illustrious President playing ping-pong with his Finance Ministers. Actually, this is the result of Snorre stretching up against the tripod to play with the flashing green light on the camera. B is the trace of the Orion Nebula (M42/NGC 1976) and C indicates the traces of Orion’s three belt stars (Alnitak, Alnilam & Mintaka) also known as the Three Kings or the Three Sisters. Camera: Nikon D5100, Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1,8G, ISO: 1000, Shutter: 4s – f/1.8, The image was generated from 93 photographs taken at 38 second intervals.& processed with StarStax ®
TOP: Crux or the Southern Cross is the smallest of the 88 constellations but other than Orion and Scorpius it is probably one of the most distinctive. Two of the stars in Crux appear to have planets and it also contains the distinctive open cluster known as the Jewel Box (NGC 4755) as well as the extensive dark nebulae known as the Coal Sack.
Camera: Nikon D5100, Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1,8G, ISO: 1000, Shutter: 5s – f/1.8, 30 photographs stacked and processed with PhotoScape ®
BOTTOM: Star trails in the vicinity of Orion.
Legend: M1 to M4 are meteor trails and A is the tremor caused by our illustrious President playing ping-pong with his Finance Ministers. Actually, this is the result of Snorre stretching up against the tripod to play with the flashing green light on the camera. B is the trace of the Orion Nebula (M42/NGC 1976) and C indicates the traces of Orion’s three belt stars (Alnitak, Alnilam & Mintaka) also known as the Three Kings or the Three Sisters.
Camera: Nikon D5100, Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1,8G, ISO: 1000, Shutter: 4s – f/1.8, The image was generated from 93 photographs taken at 38 second intervals.& processed with StarStax ®
TOP: Orion Nebula (M42/NGC 1976) It is a diffuse nebula situated in Orion’s sword at a distance of about 1340 light years. It is the closest area to the Earth in which there is a large amount of star formation in progress. M42 is about 24 light years wide. BOTTOM: Omega Centauri (? Cen/NGC 5139) The largest globular cluster in the Milky Way. Situated at 15 800 light years from the Earth it has a diameter of about 150 light years it contains an estimated 10 million stars. Camera: Nikon D5100, Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1,8G, ISO: 1000, Shutter: 4s – f/1.8, 20 photographs stacked and processed with PhotoScape ®
TOP: Orion Nebula (M42/NGC 1976) It is a diffuse nebula situated in Orion’s sword at a distance of about 1340 light years. It is the closest area to the Earth in which there is a large amount of star formation in progress. M42 is about 24 light years wide. BOTTOM: Omega Centauri (? Cen/NGC 5139) The largest globular cluster in the Milky Way. Situated at 15 800 light years from the Earth it has a diameter of about 150 light years it contains an estimated 10 million stars.
Camera: Nikon D5100, Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1,8G, ISO: 1000, Shutter: 4s – f/1.8, 20 photographs stacked and processed with PhotoScape ®
Eta Carinae at bottom left is a star grouping that contains two stars with a combined brightness that is several million times that of our Sun, It is situated at about 7 500 light years from the Earth in the constellation Carina. The primary star is expected to explode as a supernova in the not too far distant astronomical future. The Southern Pleiades (IC 2602) is an open cluster in the constellation Carina and contains about 60 stars. This cluster is between 35 and 45 million years old and lies approximately 500 light years away with a diameter of about 15 light years. Camera: Nikon D5100, Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1,8G, ISO: 1000, Shutter: 5s – f/1.8, 15 photographs stacked and processed with PhotoScape ®
Eta Carinae at bottom left is a star grouping that contains two stars with a combined brightness that is several million times that of our Sun, It is situated at about 7 500 light years from the Earth in the constellation Carina. The primary star is expected to explode as a supernova in the not too far distant astronomical future. The Southern Pleiades (IC 2602) is an open cluster in the constellation Carina and contains about 60 stars. This cluster is between 35 and 45 million years old and lies approximately 500 light years away with a diameter of about 15 light years.
Camera: Nikon D5100, Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1,8G, ISO: 1000, Shutter: 5s – f/1.8, 15 photographs stacked and processed with PhotoScape ®

We arrived home safely and started the dreaded unpacking and packing away to wrap up our final visit to Leeuwenboschfontein for 2015, but we will be back in 2016. We did not make use of the stargazing enclosure next to the runway this time because there were very few other people in the camp so we could control the lights. A problem with the water supply has also resulted in the grass dying inside the enclosure so it would have been very sandy and dusty in there. Johan snr has promised the grass will be back in 2016 and so will we, hopefully on a regular basis.