Stargazing at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront: Saturday the 09th of July 2016.

“Third time lucky” is an expression one often hears and it certainly applied to or stargazing efforts at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront. After poor weather in May and worse weather in June we had fantastic open skies this time. Unfortunately the Sun wasn’t as well endowed with sunspots as we would have like it to be, which immediately brings to mind the hackneyed expression “What you lose on the swings, you gain on the roundabouts”.

TOP LEFT: Lion’s Head and Signal Hill against a clear blue sky as we head for Cape Town on the N1. BOTTOM LEFT: Table Mountain and Devil’s Peak from the N1. TOP RIGHT: Devil’s Peak from the N2. MIDDLE RIGHT: Lion’s Head and Signal Hill as we pass Paarden Island on the N1. BOTTOM RIGHT: The final approach to the Victoria and Albert Waterfront.
TOP LEFT: Lion’s Head and Signal Hill against a clear blue sky as we head for Cape Town on the N1. BOTTOM LEFT: Table Mountain and Devil’s Peak from the N1. TOP RIGHT: Devil’s Peak from the N2. MIDDLE RIGHT: Lion’s Head and Signal Hill as we pass Paarden Island on the N1. BOTTOM RIGHT: The final approach to the Victoria and Albert Waterfront.
TOP LEFT: The harbour entrance from the Pierhead. TOP RIGHT: View from the Pierhead toward the main shopping centre at the Waterfront. MIDDLE LEFT: A pirate ship full of sightseers coming home. MIDDLE RIGHT: The container ship “Yellowstone” being brought into the harbour. BOTTOM LEFT: “Southern Cross” taking its umpteenth load of sightseers out to sea. BOTTOM RIGHT: The pirate ship returning to its moorings after the last trip of the day.
TOP LEFT: The harbour entrance from the Pierhead. TOP RIGHT: View from the Pierhead toward the main shopping centre at the Waterfront. MIDDLE LEFT: A pirate ship full of sightseers coming home. MIDDLE RIGHT: The container ship “Yellowstone” being brought into the harbour. BOTTOM LEFT:Southern Cross” taking its umpteenth load of sightseers out to sea. BOTTOM RIGHT: The pirate ship returning to its moorings after the last trip of the day.

Lynnette and I made had to first drop John-Henry off in Mowbray but we were still first on the scene followed by Alan and Rose, then Dirk and lastly Auke and the birthday girl, Wendy. It soon became clear that the fine weather had lured the visitors out in force and there were many more people in the Waterfront than on either of our previous visits. We were soon very busy.

The seagulls were really out in force on Saturday.
The seagulls were really out in force on Saturday.
TOP LEFT: Maphefu (an eight-inch Dobsonian), partially hidden on the left with Auke and Wendy in attendance. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke shielding a visitor at the eyepiece from the sun. TOP RIGHT: Getting Lorenzo (a 10-inch Dobsonian) set up while three visitors wait patiently. MIDDLE RIGHT: Maphefu and Auke on the left and Lorenzo and I partially obscured behind the poster A-frame. BOTTOM RIGHT: Lorenzo and I with interested visitors.
TOP LEFT: Maphefu (an eight-inch Dobsonian), partially hidden on the left with Auke and Wendy in attendance. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke shielding a visitor at the eyepiece from the sun. TOP RIGHT: Getting Lorenzo (a 10-inch Dobsonian) set up while three visitors wait patiently. MIDDLE RIGHT: Maphefu and Auke on the left and Lorenzo and I partially obscured behind the poster A-frame. BOTTOM RIGHT: Lorenzo and I with interested visitors.

Alan and Rosemary had their eight-inch Dobsonian set up close to the water’s edge. I suppose you can take a man out of the Navy but you can’t really take the sea out of a naval man, Alan? Dirk set up his Celestron close to the two red poodles, probably because he missed his Yorkies, while Auke and Wendy set up Maphefu, Auke’s eight-inch Dobsonian, an outreach veteran, next to the signpost.

TOP LEFT: Lorenzo and I discussing laser interferometry with a visitor. The tube mounted on Lorenzo is the (Bob) Marley 40 mm Solar-finder. BOTTOM LEFT: Alan and a group of visitors viewing the Moon through his eight-inch Dobsonian. TOP RIGHT: Auke, Maphefu and Wendy discussing the Sun with a younger group of visitors. MIDDLE RIGHT: Wendy and Maphefu on the left and Lorenzo and I on the right. BOTTOM RIGHT: Dirk and his Celestron entertain two visitors.
TOP LEFT: Lorenzo and I discussing laser interferometry with a visitor. The tube mounted on Lorenzo is the (Bob) Marley 40 mm Solar-finder. BOTTOM LEFT: Alan and a group of visitors viewing the Moon through his eight-inch Dobsonian. TOP RIGHT: Auke, Maphefu and Wendy discussing the Sun with a younger group of visitors. MIDDLE RIGHT: Wendy and Maphefu on the left and Lorenzo and I on the right. BOTTOM RIGHT: Dirk and his Celestron entertain two visitors.

Auke had his very nifty demonstration of how to use a simple pinhole to calculate the size of the Sun set up there as well. Lynnette and I set up Lorenzo our workhorse 10-inch Dobsonian, also a veteran of many outreach events, a short distance away from Auke and Wendy.

TOP: While Lynnette gets Lorenzo on target just watch the two ladies behind her. What is so terrible or astounding that the lady on the right has to hide behind her hand? Sunglasses apparently provide sufficient protection to the lady on the left. MIDDLE: Peeking over her hand with a raised index finger the lady on the right now comments to her friend on the left, who is still watching whatever interests them intently. BOTTOM: The lady on the left is clearly amused while the lady on the right once again shuts her eyes and takes refuge behind her hand.
TOP: While Lynnette gets Lorenzo on target just watch the two ladies behind her. What is so terrible or astounding that the lady on the right has to hide behind her hand? Sunglasses apparently provide sufficient protection to the lady on the left. MIDDLE: Peeking over her hand with a raised index finger the lady on the right now comments to her friend on the left, who is still watching whatever interests them intently. BOTTOM: The lady on the left is clearly amused while the lady on the right once again shuts her eyes and takes refuge behind her hand.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lorenzo with a family of Spanish visitors. TOP RIGHT: Wendy and Maphefu with a visitor at the eyepiece eying the Sun. BOTTOM LEFT: A lull in the stream of visitors gave us the opportunity to sit down for a short while. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan making sure his telescope is on the Moon for two visitors.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lorenzo with a family of Spanish visitors. TOP RIGHT: Wendy and Maphefu with a visitor at the eyepiece eyeing the Sun. BOTTOM LEFT: A lull in the stream of visitors gave us the opportunity to sit down for a short while. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan making sure his telescope is on the Moon for two visitors.

I was surprised by the large number of foreigners but should not really have been, because the V&A is known to be a magnet for foreign tourists. One Spanish family, on seeing the name Lorenzo on our telescope, came up with the following interesting piece of information.

A Spaniard, they said, doesn’t say “the weather is very hot.” He says, “Como pega Lorenzo” (Wow, Lorenzo is hitting) which we verified at this site here. So they sometimes also call the sun “Lorenzo” and you can check that out here.

TOP LEFT: Visitors get a look at the Moon through Alan’s telescope. TOP RIGHT: Dirk and the Celestron entertain a visitor while one of his poodles looks on. MIDDLE LEFT: Lorenzo and I give visitors a look at the Sun which was, by now, quite low in the West. MIDDLE RIGHT: Our banners really did not make a good showing at all. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke and Wendy with visitors around Maphefu. BOTTOM RIGHT: With the Sun so low it was now much easier for the shorter visitors to get to the eyepiece. I had forgotten my ladder – again!
TOP LEFT: Visitors get a look at the Moon through Alan’s telescope. TOP RIGHT: Dirk and the Celestron entertain a visitor while one of his poodles looks on. MIDDLE LEFT: Lorenzo and I give visitors a look at the Sun which was, by now, quite low in the West. MIDDLE RIGHT: Our banners really did not make a good showing at all. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke and Wendy with visitors around Maphefu. BOTTOM RIGHT: With the Sun so low it was now much easier for the shorter visitors to get to the eyepiece. I had forgotten my ladder – again!
TOP: We had quite a few people on site most of the time. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lorenzo and I hard at work while our poster displays generate some interest as well. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Dirk explaining some technicality. I wonder if he doesn’t sometimes tell fish stories when he waves his hands around like that? BOTTOM: Alan just left of centre, Wendy right of centre and Dirk on the right.
TOP: We had quite a few people on site most of the time. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lorenzo and I hard at work while our poster displays generate some interest as well. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Dirk explaining some technicality. I wonder if he doesn’t sometimes tell fish stories when he waves his hands around like that? BOTTOM: Alan just left of centre, Wendy right of centre and Dirk on the right.
TOP LEFT: A group of chuffed visitors have just successfully completed Auke’s Sun-diameter task. TOP RIGHT: The shadows are getting very long as Dirk waits for his next group of visitors. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke showing two visitors how to make things disappear. BOTTOM RIGHT: Auke answering questions for two younger visitors.
TOP LEFT: A group of chuffed visitors have just successfully completed Auke’s Sun-diameter task. TOP RIGHT: The shadows are getting very long as Dirk waits for his next group of visitors. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke showing two visitors how to make things disappear. BOTTOM RIGHT: Auke answering questions for two younger visitors.

It was a warm sunny day with very few sunspots but lots of interested and interesting people. The 30% illuminated waxing moon had risen shortly after 11:00, so it was well positioned for Alan and Dirk who do not have solar filters for their telescopes. My, soon to be patented, (Bob) Marley 40 mm Solar-finder worked very well and the erudite Mr Cassells even complimented me by saying it looked “very professional”.

TOP LEFT: A Dirk and his Celestron wait patiently. TOP RIGHT: The visitors start arriving and Dirk goes into action. MIDDLE LEFT: The back is the best part of a donkey I have always been told. MIDDLE RIGHT: Dirk and the Celestron in action. BOTTOM LEFT: Wow! That is a big globe. BOTTOM RIGHT: The sun is awkwardly low in the West by now and the crowds are definitely thinning.
TOP LEFT: A Dirk and his Celestron wait patiently. TOP RIGHT: The visitors start arriving and Dirk goes into action. MIDDLE LEFT: The back is the best part of a donkey I have always been told. MIDDLE RIGHT: Dirk and the Celestron in action. BOTTOM LEFT: Wow! That is a big globe. BOTTOM RIGHT: The sun is awkwardly low in the West by now and the crowds are definitely thinning.
TOP LEFT: Dirk, the Celestron and his other poodle. MIDDLE LEFT: Our Space Junk poster drew quite a lot of attention. BOTTOM LEFT: After dark we could show visitors Jupiter, Mars and Saturn. TOP RIGHT: By now the Sun was so low that visitors had to get down on their knees so I switched Lorenzo to the Moon. BOTTOM RIGHT: Two very interested visitors who also wanted to receive information on the Southern Star Party.
TOP LEFT: Dirk, the Celestron and his other poodle. MIDDLE LEFT: Our Space Junk poster drew quite a lot of attention. BOTTOM LEFT: After dark we could show visitors Jupiter, Mars and Saturn. TOP RIGHT: By now the Sun was so low that visitors had to get down on their knees so I switched Lorenzo to the Moon. BOTTOM RIGHT: Two very interested visitors who also wanted to receive information on the Southern Star Party.

Once the Sun went down it quickly became chilly but the sky was clear and we were able to show the Moon in high definition as well as Jupiter, Mars and Saturn to a host of visitors. I used a 9 mm eyepiece on Lorenzo, which gave visitors a quite spectacular view of the Moon and the other objects but also meant that I was kept busy making corrections to keep the objects in the field of vision.

We packed up at 21:00 just as the dew was beginning to become problematic. At that stage there were still quite a few people around but with a tally of 1622 visitors on our counters we felt that enough was enough. After packing up we handed over Wendy’s birthday present and went our various ways homeward.

TOP LEFT: As the temperature dropped out came the jackets and coats. Dirk on the left has already got his coat out and Wendy would shortly follow suit. TOP RIGHT: Even after dark our posters still made a good showing. BOTTOM LEFT: The Waterfront is brightly lit at night but the Pierhead is one of the darker areas, which is why we chose it for these outings. BOTTOM RIGHT: Star People and Star Friends. We are minus Dirk, who managed to pack up faster than the rest of us and had already left, and Auke, who took the photo. Alan is handing Wendy her birthday card. She had just turned 21 and a bit!
TOP LEFT: As the temperature dropped out came the jackets and coats. Dirk on the left has already got his coat out and Wendy would shortly follow suit. TOP RIGHT: Even after dark our posters still made a good showing. BOTTOM LEFT: The Waterfront is brightly lit at night but the Pierhead is one of the darker areas, which is why we chose it for these outings. BOTTOM RIGHT: Star People and Star Friends. We are minus Dirk, who managed to pack up faster than the rest of us and had already left, and Auke, who took the photo. Alan is handing Wendy her birthday card. She had just turned 21 and a bit!

On outings like this one always encounters people with odd requests and non-mainstream views and Saturday was no exception. There was one small group that insisted I show them the planet Nibiru and all my diplomatic attempts to convince them of its non-existence came to naught. I eventually resorted to verbal force majeure to get rid of them when they became abusive about my inability to show it to them. This by the way was all in broad daylight! Another gentleman insisted that the telescope was an instrument of the anti-Christ and that Saturn was, in fact, Satan’s seat of power. He eventually wandered of proclaiming to all and sundry that science was actually the anti-Christ not just poor Lorenzo. Lorenzo was relieved.

On Sunday it was all about unpacking and putting all the stuff out to dry before packing everything away again.

For more about this outing please also visit this site here.

Our future dates at the Waterfront can all be found by visiting this site here.

A view of the Moon

A view of the Southern Hemisphere Moon

DSC_0006X_Maan_F-0_0-005s_ISO400
Taken with a Nikon D5100 mounted directly (no lens used) onto a 12″ Skywatcher Dobsonian telescope.
Location: Brackenfell, patient Western Cape, help South Africa
GPS: 33.811S, view 18.68E
Altitude: 75m
Date Shot: 09/11/2013
Time Shot: 20:57:27.80
Aperture: F0
Shutter Speed: 1/200s
Exposure Mode: Manual
Exposure Comp: 0EV
Metering: Center-Weighted
ISO: 400