Outreach by StarPeople for SKA-Africa during National Science Week 2017 at the Iziko South African Museum: Thursday 17th August 2017

Thursday required an early start to beat the infamous N1-traffic and have breakfast at the Rcafe in Long Street (go here to find out more) before starting our day. We left Brackenfell at 05:17, which was actually later than our original ITD of 05:00. ITD? My shorthand for Intended Time of Departure. We were parked in front of Rcafe by 05:45 which meant that the trip had taken us a mere 28 minutes. As soon as the doors opened at 06:00 Lynnette and I went inside to order two much needed Americano’s to start the day properly. What really amazed us was that the owner and staff recognized us the moment we walked in the door and it was a few days more than a year since we’d last been there! Auke arrived shortly after us and ordered his cappuccino. After breakfast, we headed for the Iziko South African Museum (click here for more information) where Benjamin was waiting to unlock the gates for us and set out the traffic cones to prevent vehicles entering our display and observing space in the amphitheatre. The weather was clear but blustery. The wind was, in fact, such a nuisance that I eventually took down and put away the posters, as the frames were being badly scratched every time they toppled over onto the brick paving. Anyway, by 08:00 we were ready to roll and all we needed was a visitor or two, which we soon got.

TOP LEFT: 05:20 and on our way to Cape Town for an early breakfast with Auke at the Rcafe in Long Street. CENTRE LEFT: View from the Gardens with the posters up, telescopes aligned, solar filters taped and waiting for the people. BOTTOM LEFT: View from the Museum with Auke making last minute adjustments. TOP RIGHT: I quite honestly do not know what on Earth I was doing here. Perhaps trying to get an upside down view of our Universe on the poster? BOTTOM RIGHT: This group was from Germany and apparently unable to speak English so the guide worked through a translator. The guide was not wearing a badge and when Lynnette asked him why not, he put his finger to his lips, refused to sign our register and disappeared very quickly with his group.
TOP LEFT: This huge group of highly mobile, extremely vociferous, perpetual motion entities were disguised as pre-school children but I wasn’t fooled. TOP RIGHT: Looking through the telescope seemed to limit them to a single location for a very short period of time before they shot off again at high speed exercising their vocal cords to maximum effect. BOTTOM LEFT: Edward talking to Jay van den Berg, one-time archaeologist and now Karoo Palaeontologist at the Iziko South African Museum, after having been poached by Dr Roger Smith. Nice meeting you Jay. BOTTOM RIGHT: Interspersed among the myriad of short people were teachers and a few parents who seemed to create small islands of order and stability around themselves as they moved around.

Thursday’s are popular school days at Iziko and we had three groups that we managed to convince that they should take a peek at the Sun. There were several other school groups whose teachers waved us away when we invited them to view the Sun. Being a weekday many of our visitors were from outside the country’s borders as most South Africans were hard at work earning an income. Many of the tour guides with the groups declined to let their tourists take a look at the Sun. Their reason was mostly that they had a schedule to keep to and did not have the time. Nevertheless, we had groups from Gabon, Thailand, Hong Kong, France, Netherlands, Israel, and Germany.

TOP LEFT: Auke showing a group the Sun and discussing Solar Physics. TOP RIGHT: An attentive group waiting their turn to look at the Sun with Auke. BOTTOM LEFT: This local couple was far more clued up about things like Space Weather than the average visitor. Always pleasant to talk to people that know enough to ask some testing questions. BOTTOM RIGHT: This visitor conveniently helped himself to a view of the Sun while Edward answered questions in the background.
TOP LEFT: Edward and a group of younger visitors accompanied by a watchful parent. TOP RIGHT: This very well organised primary school visited us with their teachers. It was lovely having such an orderly group. BOTTOM LEFT: A teacher keeping an eye (and ear) on Auke as he talks to a group of learners. BOTTOM RIGHT: Lynnette, with a young person, who was so eager to look at the Sun that he couldn’t wait for the ladder, but stood on the tips of his toes to reach the eyepiece.

It was also nice to have the research staff from the backrooms of Iziko pay us a visit. I was especially pleased to make the acquaintance of Jay van den Berg a palaeontologist on Dr Roger Smith’s staff and Clair Browning the newly appointed Curator of the Karoo Collection.

TOP: Auke with some members of a group that came through in the morning. BOTTOM: Packing up. It never ceases to amaze me that, despite careful planning, there are always things that don’t seem to fit where they were when one unpacked them.

The problem of getting people to sign our visitor’s book was highlighted for the umpteenth time. Many people who viewed the Sun through our telescopes flatly refused to sign the list and some actually became quite agitated when asked to do so. This problem is exasperated when one is busy and you simply do not have time to chase after people and ask them to sign. So, once again, our signature total (288) and counter tally (597) do not agree. I am more convinced than ever that the answer lies in devising a means to automatically count the number of people who look into each telescope’s eyepiece.

Because the Sun appears as a very bland and uninteresting white ball as a result of of the solar filter fitted to Lorenzo, many viewers say it looks like the Moon. So I decided to do some experimenting with filters to make the image more “exciting”. The images were all taken with my mobile and I am afraid that I do not have the world’s steadiest hand, so the photos are not of the best quality.

TOP: The Sun viewed through a 25mm eyepiece on Lorenzo, the 10”Dobsonian. Lorenzo was fitted with a solar filter constructed with Baader AstroSolar™ Safety Film. I think the focus is reasonable for a mobile phone. CENTRE: The same setup as in the first photo but with a Baader Solar Continuum Filter (CWL 540nm) added to the eyepiece and I am clearly struggling more with the focus than in the first photo. BOTTOM: The same setup as in the first photo but with a Meade Series 4000 Filter No 23A added to the eyepiece and here my focus is much better. NOTE: All photos were taken with my Samsung A5 mobile at the eyepiece.
TOP: This is the image of the sunspots for the day as provided by the Solar Dynamics Team with the Earth to give one perspective. I am afraid that between Lorenzo and I we cannot quite manage this. BOTTOM: This is an enlarged view of the sunspots on the bottom image of the previous group of photos. I have flipped the photo so that the layout matches that of the top photo.

 

Solar Eclipse – Monday the 13th of September 2015

Well, there we were with ringside seats and a cloudy sky.  Thin high-level clouds which would not have been too much of a problem and thicker, fast-moving low-level clouds moving in ahead of a cold front. It was the low-level lot that was a problem because a gap would hardly have opened up when it was promptly closed up again. Despite the adverse conditions I did manage to get several photographs of the partially eclipsed sun.

These were the weather conditions one had to contend with while trying to photograph the eclipse.
These were the weather conditions one had to contend with while trying to photograph the eclipse.

I have put the time each photograph was taken in the caption so that one gets some idea of the progression of the eclipse.  All the photographs were taken with a Nikon D5100 camera mounted at prime focus on a Newtonian reflector (D=250), ISO 400 and shutter speed = 0.25 seconds.

This was the first clear shot I got at 07:26:04.80
This was the first clear shot I got at 07:26:04.80
Here the sun just started peeping out behind the clouds at 07:32:49.00
Here the sun just started peeping out behind the clouds at 07:32:49.00
A little bit more of the sun showing at 07:39:10.60
A little bit more of the sun showing at 07:39:10.60 and the first sunspot appears
Here the sun was almost clear of the clouds at 07:44:11.80
Here the sun was almost clear of the clouds at 07:44:11.80 and we have a second sunspot
Almost no  clouds and it looked as if we might get quite a large gap at 07:50:21.90
Almost no clouds here and it looked as if we might get quite a large gap at 07:50:21.90 with two definite sunspots
Just a faint hint of clouds at 07:52:22.50
Just a faint hint of clouds at 07:52:22.50
Back the clouds came at 08:00:00.90
Back the clouds came at 08:00:00.90
This was pretty much the end of my eclipse section at 08:20:38.40
This was pretty much the end of my eclipse section at 08:20:38.40
By 09:11:07.40 the clouds opened up a large gap just to notify me that the eclipse was over before closing in again
By 09:11:07.40 the clouds opened up a large gap just to notify me that the eclipse was over before closing in again and one can now see five sunspots

 

Southern African Astronomical Observatory Telescopes hit the Road: February 2015

The 0.5m and 0.75m telescopes will soon be leaving Sutherland for Durban (University of KwaZulu Natal) and Boyden (University of Free State) respectively.

The 0.5m was constructed by Boller & Chivens of Pasadena, California, for the Republic Observatory in Johannesburg at the end of 1968. Boller & Chivens collaborated with Perkin-Elmer during the 1950’s to develop and manufacture the Baker-Nunn satellite tracking camera for the United States Vanguard satellite tracking program. Eventually, the company was taken over by Perkin-Elmer in 1965. The telescope’s main function at the Republic Observatory was photometry and planetary photography and was, in fact, the only telescope ready for use in June 1972 at the new Southern African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) location in Sutherland. Initially, it was used with the Texas designed UCT high-speed photometer connected to a Nova minicomputer with software by R.E. Nather. Later the “People’s Photometer”, designed by Richard Bingham and built at the Greenwich Observatory, became the main instrument deployed with this telescope. A considerable number of publications about rapid variables such as dwarf novae originated from data produced by the 0.5m telescope.

The mounting of the 0.75m was originally located at the SAAO site in Cape Town. Its old home is currently the IT building. While there, from 1964 onward, it was officially known as the Multiple Refractor Mount (MRM) because it carried three refractors and the largest of the three produced around 7000 photographic plates between 1964 and 1970. These plates were part of the extensive Southern Reference Star Programme. The 0.75m telescope itself was a reflector telescope and was specially built for installation in Sutherland by Grubb Parsons of Newcastle upon Tyne, England, in 1974. Grubb Parsons was officially Sir Howard Grubb, Parsons and Co. Ltd. The company was originally founded in Dublin by Thomas Grubb as the Grubb Telescope Company in 1833. He was joined by his son Howard in 1864. In 1925 Sir Charles Parsons bought the company and renamed it. The company had an illustrious career as a builder of formidable telescopes until it ceased to trade in 1985. A list is provided at the end of this post. The 0.75m telescope also had an impressive career at Sutherland where it was used for many important infrared and visible light studies of stars, including the supernova that exploded in 1987 in one of our neighbouring galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

According to Dr. Ramotholo Sefako, head of Telescope Operations at the SAAO says the domes of the 0.5m and 0.75m telescopes will be modified after the telescopes have been moved. Both domes will eventually house new robotic telescopes. One of these telescopes is the 0.65m MeerLICHT that will be used to simultaneously observe the same part of the sky at night as the MeerKAT radio telescope outside Carnarvon. It will provide a real-time optical view of the radio transient sky as observed on MeerKAT. MeerLICHT is jointly owned by the University of Cape Town, SAAO, the Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NOW), and University of Oxford. The second dome will house the new SAAO 1.0m wide-field telescope with modern instrumentation. Currently, none of the SAAO telescopes have a wide field so this creates a new dimension in the SAAO’s research capabilities. This telescope will be installed late in 2015 or early in 2016.

You can visit the SAAO site to see pictures and read more about this exciting development if you go here.

Some telescopes produced by the Grubb Telescope Company and Grubb Parsons of Newcastle upon Tyne.
The “Great Melbourne Telescope” – a 48-inch-diameter (122cm) reflecting telescope with a speculum primary mirror (1868).
The 27-inch (68cm) refractor for the Vienna Observatory (1878).
The 10-inch (25cm) refractor at Armagh Observatory (1882).
Seven 13 inch (33cm) refracting telescopes for the Carte du Ciel international photographic star catalogue project (1887).
The 28-inch (71cm) refractor at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich (1893).
The 10-inch (25cm) refractor at Coats Observatory, Paisley (1898).
After 1925 they built the optical components for the Anglo-Australian Telescope, the UK Infrared Telescope, the Isaac Newton Telescope and the William Herschel Telescope.

Autumn Southern Star Party from April 25th to April 28th 2014

Night Sky Caravan Park, Oudekraal, Bonnievale (-33.012486, 19.994881& 207m)

To start with, a special word of thanks to the sponsors, speakers, newcomers, day visitors and of course the regulars who helped to make the event possible. If you want to read some feedback from people who attended the Star Party please go here.

Sponsors:
Andrie van der Linde, Eridanus Optics,
http://www.eridanusoptics.com/store

Anneliese Carstens, Bonnievale Verhurings, Gelukshoop,
marankis@lando.co.za

Gesina de Wet, Oudekraal, Bonnievale,
nightsky@breede.co.za

SAASTA, South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement,
http://www.saasta.ac.za

Waltons – Stellenbosch,
http://www.waltons.co.za

Donors
Alan & Rose Cassells – the two lights for the interior of the marquee.

Speakers (in order of appearance)
Martin Lyons – “Live Video Astronomy Demo”
Kos Coroniaos – “Amateur Astronomy in South Africa”
Martin Lyons – “Basic Spectroscopic Astronomy”
Lia Labuschagne – “Brown Dwarfs”
Alan Cassels – “Comfortable observing – Moving the Beast”
Auke Slotegraaf – “Photometry with a DSLR Camera”
Kechil Kirkham – “The SKA – The story so far”
Kerry Patterson – “Planetary Models of Hu Aquarii”
Brett du Preez – “Collimating a Newtonian Reflector Telescope”

Newcomers
Dwayne Engelbrecht, Lia Labuschagne, Charmaine Pretorius, Anneke Steyn, Bernie, Michelle & Keagan Swanepoel, Gerhard Vermeulen and Wendy Vermeulen

Day visitors
Anneliese & Tertius Carstens, Willie Lombard & Elise, Inus & Elsophie van Staden

The “old hands”
Alan & Rose Cassells, Charl and Yolandi Cater, Kos Coronaios, Brett du Preez, Wim Filmalter, Iain Finlay, Kechil Kirkham, Martin Lyons, Kerry Paterson, John Richards, Leslie Rose, Auke Slotegraaf, Willem van Zyl, and of course Lynnette and myself.

The 2014 Autumn Southern Star Parties Group Photo
The 2014 Autumn Southern Star Parties Group Photo

Lynnette, Snorre the cat and I got off to a very early start in Brackenfell and arrived at Night Sky by about 09:30 on Thursday.  Alan and Rose were already settled in and shortly after 10:00 Anneliese Carstens of Bonnievale Verhuurings and her two assistants were on site to pitch the marquee tent.  The whole process took just over 70 minute.  As soon as that was done,  we started putting up the banners and posters and doing all the other essentials to get the inside organized.  Alan and Rose pitched in to help with this and without their very able assistance, the job would have taken a great deal longer.  Thanks guys, as usual your convivial company made an otherwise boring task seem quite fun. Lynnette got the Admin table sorted out, as well as the chairs in the main tent and the coffee bar at the back of the tent.

The banner displayed at the entrance to Night Sky Caravan Park dates back to a 2004 astronomy outreach programme
The banner we displayed at the entrance to Night Sky Caravan Park dates back to a 2004 astronomy outreach programme
The side of the marquee tent facing the main camp area
The side of the marquee tent facing the main camp area
The left side of the tent's interior with the Admin Table on the left.
The left side of the tent’s interior with the Admin Table on the left.
The right side of the tent's interior.  The Sale Table is hidden by the chairs on the right.  All banners, inside and outside the tent, were designed by Auke.
The right side of the tent’s interior. The Sale Table is hidden by the chairs on the right. All banners, inside and outside the tent, were designed by Auke.
The Coffee Table was open all day and all night
The Coffee Table was open all day and all night
The Sale Table later sported binoculars and eyepieces put up for sale by various attendees.
The Sale Table later sported binoculars and eyepieces put up for sale by various attendees.

 

Lynnette at the Admin Table
Lynnette at the Admin Table

Thursday evening didn’t offer much by way of stargazing as it was one of those evenings where the clouds opened up and, just as one thought it was telescope time, they closed in again. Somewhere between 02:00 and 03:00 I got up to have a peek and it was totally clear, but I was too lazy to take the telescopes outside.

During the course of Friday most of the others trickled in, but by sunset there were still people on the list who had not turned up so we decided to move the Pub Quiz forward to the Saturday.

The weather looked indecisive about being cloudy or not, so we socialized and had an uncharacteristically late braai while Martin Lyons started setting up for his live video astronomy demonstration. Unfortunately the electronic gremlins were out in force and even with the able assistance of Kos Coraniaos the system obstinately refused to perform to expectations. As the clouds had cleared up we all dispersed to the telescopes and spent the rest of the evening observing or introducing the newcomers to the wonders of the night sky.

John, Alan & Leslie around the braai fires
John, Alan & Leslie around the braai fires
Paul, Alan, part of the camp and the marquee looking almost due South
Paul, Alan, part of the camp and the marquee looking almost due south
Evening reflection looking south-east
Evening reflection looking south-east
Alan point out a UFO to Paul, or maybe an early star?
Alan pointing out a UFO to Paul, or maybe an early star?

On Saturday Kos kicked off the programme followed by Lia in Martin’s vacant slot. The planned braai turned into a bit of a fiasco, because it started raining quite heavily just as the fires got going nicely. Kos and Wim’s attempts to rescue one of the fires by putting the braai drum on Brett and Leslie’s stoep, had unexpected consequences. Despite the fact that they closed the doors and windows the smoke from the fire still got into the house and tainted everything with a distinct “wood smoke” odour.

I am going to get myself a camera with a CCD this wide
I am going to get myself a camera with a CCD this wide
Leslie, Brett & Wenday at Kos's talk
Leslie, Brett, Wendy, Charmain & Gerhard at Kos’s talk
Lia concentrating on Brown Dwarfs
Lia concentrating on Brown Dwarfs
Reflections on the dam of the rain that was to follow shortly afterwards
Reflections on the dam of the rain that was to follow shortly afterwards

Even though Martin’s talk had been cancelled as a result of his equipment failure, leaving an open slot for an extended lunch, the braai was so late that Alan had to wait for people to finish eating before he could start his talk.  After Alan’s talk, Auke presented Alan with his long-awaited observing certificate and a special t-shirt commemorating his acquisition of a 12-inch telescope.  After that ceremony we took the group photo and set ourselves up for the Pub Quiz after supper.

Alan maneuvering The Beast into position
Alan maneuvering The Beast into position
Alan's ingenious drawing table
Alan’s ingenious drawing table
Auke handing over Alan's observing certificate
Auke handing over Alan’s observing certificate
Alan and the long overdue observing certificate
Alan and the long overdue observing certificate
Alan receiving his 12-inch t-shirt
Alan receiving his 12-inch t-shirt
Leslie & Auke enjoying the sunshine after the rain while the braai fires got going again
Leslie & Auke enjoying the sunshine after the rain while the braai fires got going again
Gesina after delivering the SSP-cake
Gesina, after delivering the Southern Star Party cake
Auke and Gesina in a congenial mood
Auke and Gesina in a congenial mood

The Pub Quiz was contended between six teams. After the first three rounds, three teams were eliminated leaving three to contest the next four rounds before Lia and John’s team made it through to the finals. It was a tight race between these two teams until John’s team took the lead. By that time the weather had cleared completely leaving everyone itching to get to the telescopes, so this year’s Quiz, like the Spring SSP in 2013, was not taken to the individual level. Probably a good thing because John has already won the Quiz twice before on an individual basis!

A rainbow at night is a shepherd's delight or something to that effect
A rainbow at night is a shepherd’s delight or something to that effect
With the clouds looking as if they were clearing people hastily started setting up so that they could start observing after the Pub Quiz
With the clouds looking as if they were clearing people hastily started setting up so that they could start observing after the Pub Quiz
Richard, Charl and Yolandi have spotted something interesting in the evening sky
Richard, Charl and Yolandi have spotted something interesting in the evening sky
Wim is also looking but Yolandi seems to be be worrying about the photographer
Wim is also looking but Yolandi seems to be be worrying about the photographer
Al set up and ready to fire off the first salvo in the Autumn 2014 Pub Quiz
All set up and ready to fire off the first salvo in the Autumn 2014 Southern Star Pub Quiz
The final rounds and on my left gaining steadily, John's team
The final rounds and on my left gaining steadily, John’s team
The final rounds and on my right, putting up a brave fight to stay in the lead, Lia's team team
The final rounds and on my right, putting up a brave fight to stay in the lead, Lia’s team
The winners of the Autumn 2014 Southern Star Pub Quiz. Bernie Swanepoel, Muchelle Swanepoel, Iain Finlay, John Richards and Keagan Swanepole.  Keagan is wearing the coveted Southern Star Party Pub Quiz Floating Rosette
The winners of the Autumn 2014 Southern Star Pub Quiz. Bernie Swanepoel, Michelle Swanepoel, Iain Finlay, John Richards and Keagan Swanepoel. Keagan is wearing the coveted Southern Star Party Pub Quiz Floating Rosette

For the evening and late-night coffee we had a very nice cake baked by Gesina to commemorate the seventh Southern Star Party.  The cake was iced in blue and decorated with silver stars.  The cake also served to celebrate John Richard’s 70th birthday and we wish him well on his next 100 years.  A very nice gesture indeed, thanks Lynnette.

The Southern Star Parties Cake commemorating seven Star parties (and John's birthday)
The Southern Star Parties Cake commemorating seven Southern Star Parties (and John’s birthday this time too)

Sunday’s day-programme went off without a hitch. Auke had to leave just after his talk to get Kos back to Somerset West and then he unfortunately encountered a problem and was unable to return as planned. By evening the sky was clouded over, much to everyone’s disappointment, so we also cancelled the scheduled “Ethno-What’s up Tonight”. Anneliese and Tertius had come over specially for the stars, so it was a great disappointment for them.  However, just as we were sitting down having coffee with them, Leslie knocked on the door and announced that the clouds were clearing so we could set up a telescope and take them on a tour. Before midnight Lynnette and I gave up the unequal battle with the dew and went to bed.

Auke seated, left back talking about photometry with a DSLR camera
Auke seated, left back talking about photometry with a DSLR camera
Kechil talking about the SKA after having shown us how to dance the SKA!
Kechil talking about the SKA after having shown us how to dance the SKA!
Kerry explaining the intricacies of HU Aquarii
Kerry explaining the intricacies of HU Aquarii
Brett explaining exactly why most of us avoid collimating our telescopes
Brett explaining exactly why most of us avoid collimating our telescopes
The sunset was absolutely magnificent
The sunset was absolutely magnificent
Much later we could actually do some stargazing on an absolutely windless night as evidenced by the reflections in the dam
Much later we could actually do some stargazing on an absolutely windless night as evidenced by the reflections in the dam
Over on the far side of the dam a moving red light is reflected in the water
Over on the far side of the dam a moving red light is reflected in the water
The Magellanic Clouds, 47 Tuc, the Tarantula very faintly and a tiny corner of the Milky Way
The Magellanic Clouds, 47 Tuc, the Tarantula very faintly and a tiny corner of the Milky Way

On Monday morning everyone was packing up and saying goodbyes. In-between all the farewells, we took down the posters and banners in the tent, folded up tables, stacked chairs and loaded the trailer. By that evening it was only Lynnette, Snorre, myself and Iain and Willem left.

On Tuesday morning with the clouds building up, Anneliese and her crew arrived to take down the marquee.  Iain and Willem were also packing up and when Anneliese and her crew had finished one of her crew remarked, “Look at those two still struggling with that little tent and we’ve already finished with the big one.”  Iain and Willem did eventually finish and left shortly after midday.  Lynnette and Snorre and I stayed till Wednesday before we left for home via the Pitkos Farm Stall.  Regrettably they had no more roosterkoek by the time we got there so we just had coffee and bought a box of Nuy Muscadel for the next SSP in October 2014 before heading home!

This table gives the sky brightness readings obtained during the Autumn 2014 Southern Star Party.

Place Night Sky Caravan Park Night Sky Caravan Park Night Sky Caravan Park Night Sky Caravan Park Night Sky Caravan Park Night Sky Caravan Park
Locality & GPS -33°00’44.95″, 19°59’41.57″, 207m -33°00’44.95″, 19°59’41.57″, 207m -33°00’44.95″, 19°59’41.57″, 207m -33°00’44.95″, 19°59’41.57″, 207m -33°00’44.95″, 19°59’41.57″, 207m -33°00’44.95″, 19°59’41.57″, 207m
Date 24/03/2014 25/03/2014 26/03/2014 27/03/2014 28/03/2014 29/03/2014
Time (SAST) 22:30 23:30 22:00 22:00 22:00 22:00
Temp (°C) 18.00 17.00 16.00 16.00 16.00 17.00
SQM1 21.68 21.58 21.61 21.67 21.59 21.65
SQM2 21.65 21.57 21.62 21.67 21.60 21.64
SQM3 21.66 21.56 21.62 21.66 21.61 21.65
SQM4 21.64 21.59 21.63 21.66 21.60 21.64
SQM5 21.65 21.58 21.60 21.67 21.61 21.64
SQM6 21.63 21.56 21.61 21.68 21.60 21.64
SQM7 21.65 21.58 21.61 21.67 21.59 21.61
SQM8 21.66 21.56 21.62 21.67 21.59 21.64
SQM9 21.65 21.55 21.61 21.66 21.60 21.63
SQM10 21.66 21.58 21.61 21.66 21.60 21.65
Average (MSAS) 21.65 21.57 21.61 21.67 21.60 21.64
StdDev (MSAS) 0.012689 0.012207 0.008000 0.006403 0.007000 0.011358
Med.(MSAS) 21.65 21.58 21.61 21.67 21.60 21.64
NELM (V mags) 6.4610 6.4203 6.4418 6.4679 6.4343 6.4541