The 13th Southern Star Party. The first to be held at Leeuwenboschfontein: Wednesday 22nd of February to Monday 27th February 2017.

The first Southern Star party held at Leeuwenboschfontein was a success. So, any suspicions about unlucky 13 were neatly sidestepped or perhaps the jinx only applies to people who suffer from triskaidekaphobia.

TOP: The barn with the display tables on the left, the lecture area in the centre and the kitchen on the right. 2nd FROM TOP: Our pull-up banners and some of the posters. 2nd FROM BOTTOM: This banner is always a showstopper. BOTTOM: The group at the opening.
TOP: The barn with the display tables on the left, the lecture area in the centre and the kitchen on the right. 2nd FROM TOP: Our pull-up banners and some of the posters. 2nd FROM BOTTOM: This banner is always a showstopper. BOTTOM: The group at the opening.

Lynnette, Snorre and I arrived on Wednesday the 22nd, downloaded our stuff at Dalzicht and set about getting the shed converted into a lecture area with a display section. Fortunately, their spacious kitchen made organising the coffee area very easy.

And here we all are. You can figure out who’s who on your own. I gave up putting in the names because we are not standing in nice neat rows and I could not make my list of names match the people in the photograph.
And here we all are. You can figure out who’s who on your own. I gave up putting in the names because we are not standing in nice neat rows and I could not make my list of names match the people in the photograph. Six people could not make it for the group photo.

Who attended:

Jim Adams (speaker), Jonathan Balladon, Deon Begeman, Ronelle Begeman, Steyn Botha, Samuel Botha, Dominique Brink, Johan Brink, Nellie Brink, Anja Bruton, Alan Cassells, Rose Cassells, Pamela Cooper, Chris de Coning, Micah de Villiers, Pierre de Villiers, Barry Dumas, Miemie Dumas, Clair Engelbrecht, Dwayne Engelbrecht, Arné Esterhuizen, Iain Finlay, Edward Foster, Lynnette Foster, Louis Fourie, Maureen Helman, Cheyenne Kersting, Christine Kersting, Harald Kersting, Jamie Kersting, Evan Knox-Davies, Dianne Nxumalo-Kohler, Robin Kohler, Bennie Kotze, Paul Kruger, Lia Labuschagne, Eddy Nijeboer, Jannie Nijeboer, Lorenzo Raynard (speaker), Kim Reitz, Marius Reitz, John Richards, Rogan Roth, Johan Roux (Jnr), (Johan Jnr’s wife), (Johan Jnr’s eldest son), (Johan Jnr’s 2nd son), Alecia Roux, Henda Scott, Barry Shipman, Auke Slotegraaf, Corne van Dyk, and Chris Vermeulen, Alex Wright.

Some of the keen people pitched on Thursday and among them were Deon and Ronelle Begeman. Deon had, as promised at the previous SSP in Bonnievale, constructed two magnificent binocular viewing tripods for Auke and myself.  This is really quite an ingenious device with many improvements over what is currently on the market and it is very reasonably priced too when compared to its competitors. I will do a separate post with pictures about it at a later stage.

What a super way to advertise the Star Party against the backdrop of the busy telescope area and Leeuwenbosch’s starry skies.
What a super way to advertise the Star Party against the backdrop of the busy telescope area and Leeuwenbosch’s starry skies.

On Thursday evening Paul and I went up Swartberg in his 4×4.  It was a whole lot easier than walking up but also considerably more taxing on one’s nerves and I am not implying that Paul drove recklessly; quite the contrary. It is just that the vehicle adopts a wide variety of very unusual angles during both the ascent and descent and one has to trust the driver a whole lot more than when driving down a normal road.

TOP: I cannot recommend a visit to the hut on top of Swartberg strongly enough. This shot shows the hut in the first rays of the rising sun. CENTRE: looking east down the Nouga Valley in the early morning with smoke from the extensive veldt fires packed in the valleys. BOTTOM: Early morning looking south-west from the hut. The Langeberg lies on the far horizon and the tiny white spike of a microwave tower is just visible at the top of Rooiberg Pass.
TOP: I cannot recommend a visit to the hut on top of Swartberg strongly enough. This shot shows the hut in the first rays of the rising sun. CENTRE: looking east down the Nouga Valley in the early morning with smoke from the extensive veldt fires packed in the valleys. BOTTOM: Early morning looking south-west from the hut. The Langeberg lies on the far horizon and the tiny white spike of a microwave tower is just visible at the top of Rooiberg Pass.
Christine took this from the lawn in front of De Oude Opstal just to prove that Paul and I had been on top of Swartberg. Thanks Christine for sharing.
Christine took this from the lawn in front of De Oude Opstal just to prove that Paul and I had been on top of Swartberg. Thanks Christine for sharing.

TOP LEFT: We had some magnificent thunderclouds on Thursday. TOP RIGHT: Paul snapped his first lightning bolt from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM LEFT: Paul’s night shot of the Leeuwenbosch complex from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM RIGHT: Paul’s early morning shot of the hut and his pickup.

TOP LEFT: We had some magnificent thunderclouds on Thursday. TOP RIGHT: Paul snapped his first lightning bolt from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM LEFT: Paul’s night shot of the Leeuwenbosch complex from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM RIGHT: Paul’s early morning shot of the hut and his pickup.

Arne and Alex had their vehicle expire on the R318 while on the way to the SSP, but they were picked up by Evan and brought to Leeuwenboschfontein. The two seemed pretty laid back about leaving the car at the side of the road until Monday when they would set about sorting it out from Cape Town.

TOP: The group attending Deon’s presentation. BOTTOM: Deon and his very good representation of the Milky Way.
TOP: The group attending Deon’s presentation. BOTTOM: Deon and his very good representation of the Milky Way.

The beginner’s session at the telescopes was quite successful on Friday as was the beginners talk on Saturday morning.

TOP LEFT: How much traffic is there in the telescope area during a star party. This tangle of lights against the star trails in the background, as captured by Auke, should give you a good indication. TOP RIGHT: Taken from a different perspective by Auke and showing the south celestial pole very nicely is a second view of the telescope area. BOTTOM LEFT: A less cluttered short exposure of the telescope area showing Leo rising in the east. BOTTOM RIGHT: There are some very rare beings prowling the telescope area at night, as this shot would seem to prove. In real life, Eddy is not nearly as daunting I assure you.
TOP LEFT: How much traffic is there in the telescope area during a star party. This tangle of lights against the star trails in the background, as captured by Auke, should give you a good indication. TOP RIGHT: Taken from a different perspective by Auke and showing the south celestial pole very nicely is a second view of the telescope area. BOTTOM LEFT: A less cluttered short exposure of the telescope area showing Leo rising in the east. BOTTOM RIGHT: There are some very rare beings prowling the telescope area at night, as this shot would seem to prove. In real life, Eddy is not nearly as daunting I assure you.

Jonathan had to leave suddenly on Saturday morning as he was needed to fly a plane somewhere.  He promised he would flash his landing lights if his route took him over Leeuwenboschfontein which it apparently didn’t.

TOP LEFT: Part of the smallish group. TOP RIGHT: Me demonstrating the Southern Star Wheel. BOTTOM LEFT: Samuel and Steyn. BOTTOM RIGHT: Steyn on the left, John in the background on the right and Henda up front.
TOP LEFT: Part of the smallish group. TOP RIGHT: Me demonstrating the Southern Star Wheel. BOTTOM LEFT: Samuel and Steyn. BOTTOM RIGHT: Steyn on the left, John in the background on the right and Henda up front.

During my beginners’ session on Saturday morning, Jim Adams, retired Deputy Chief Technologist at NASA and Anja Bruton Science Engagement Coordinator at the SKA arrived. The problem was that Lorenzo Raynard Communications Manager at the SKA, who was due to give the first talk had not pitched and all efforts to contact him were unsuccessful. Jim, hearing of our predicament, very kindly agreed to give the talk he was scheduled to give that afternoon in Lorenzo’s slot. So we started off with “Spinoff: How investing in astronomy and space science changes life on Earth”. Jim proved to be every bit as good a speaker as Anja had said he was; relaxed, knowledgeable and very good at fielding questions too.

In the meantime, Lynnette and Anja were frantically trying to trace Lorenzo.

Martin Lyons and his wife Pat flew in (literally) especially for the social braai in the lapa at the campsite during lunchtime on Saturday.  They stayed until after lunch and then flew home again. According to Paul and Louis, the takeoff was actually quite tense but Martin, during subsequent discussions, downplayed any suggestion of problems.

Just before the braai the Vito was attacked by a vicious tree and lost its back window.

The Vito was the victim of an unfortunate incident just before the braai on Saturday when it was attacked by one of the vicious trees at Leeuwenboschfontein.
The Vito was the victim of an unfortunate incident just before the braai on Saturday when it was attacked by one of the vicious trees at Leeuwenboschfontein.
TOP LEFT: Eddy and Jannie. TOP CENTRE: Louis and Deon. TOP RIGHT: Cheyenne Kersting CENTRE LEFT: Alex and Arne BOTTOM LEFT: Chris de Coning RIGHT: Micah and Auke.
TOP LEFT: Eddy and Jannie. TOP CENTRE: Louis and Deon. TOP RIGHT: Cheyenne Kersting CENTRE LEFT: Alex and Arne BOTTOM LEFT: Chris de Coning RIGHT: Micah and Auke.
TOP: Corné hard at work. CENTRE: A relaxed group outside with Alan and Rose who drove through to visit for the day. Thanks, guys! BOTTOM: Is Louis explaining where to find the stars? We will have to ask Bennie.
TOP: Corné hard at work. CENTRE: A relaxed group outside with Alan and Rose who drove through to visit for the day. Thanks, guys! BOTTOM: Is Louis explaining where to find the stars? We will have to ask Bennie.
TOP LEFT: Claire and Dwayne relaxing. TOP 2nd FROM LEFT: Barry and Miemie. TOP 2nd FROM RIGHT: A Cape Centre group tucking in. CENTRE LEFT: Alan’s version of the Polynesian fire poi possibly needs some practice. CENTRE: Myself, Lynnette and Jim. CENTRE RIGHT: Kim and Marius. BOTTOM LEFT: The Kerstings. BOTTOM RIGHT: Micah and Chris.
TOP LEFT: Claire and Dwayne relaxing. TOP 2nd FROM LEFT: Barry and Miemie. TOP 2nd FROM RIGHT: A Cape Centre group tucking in. CENTRE LEFT: Alan’s version of the Polynesian fire poi possibly needs some practice. CENTRE: Edward, Lynnette and Jim. CENTRE RIGHT: Kim and Marius. BOTTOM LEFT: The Kerstings. BOTTOM RIGHT: Micah and Chris.
TOP LEFT: Chris. TOP CENTRE: Jannie and Eddy. TOP RIGHT: Henda. CENTRE: Lia and Paul. BOTTOM LEFT: Lia. BOTTOM CENTRE: Evan and Jim. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan and Rose.
TOP LEFT: Chris. TOP CENTRE: Jannie and Eddy. TOP RIGHT: Henda. CENTRE: Lia and Paul. BOTTOM LEFT: Lia. BOTTOM CENTRE: Evan and Jim. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan and Rose.

By now Lorenzo had been traced and was on his way but would not make it in time for his time slot. We, or at least Anja, talked Jim into giving a second talk in Lorenzo’s slot. This talk “Robots in Space and Space Exploration; Past, Present and Future” went down very well with the audience.  Lorenzo finally pitched later on Saturday afternoon. As his talk would cut into observing time we decided to rather have him give his talk on Sunday morning.

After Jim’s talk and the lively question session we took the usual group photograph and, as is usual, some people did not pitch up. People who were absent were Jonathan Balladon, Steyn & Samuel Botha, Dominique & Nellie Brink and Lorenzo Raynard.

The group photograph was followed by the Pub Quiz which, this year, was orchestrated the usual degree of malevolence and cunning by Auke.  After several gruelling rounds the overall winner, by a very large margin was Alex.  Well done Alex, you left several past winners staggering around in your slipstream’s dust.

TOP LEFT: Jim Adams and during his first presentation. CENTRE LEFT: Handing over Jim’s speaker prize. BOTTOM LEFT: Lynnette, Anja and Lorenzo in conversation on Sunday morning. TOP RIGHT: Alex, the overall winner of the Pub Quiz, receiving his prize from Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Snorre surveying the proceedings.
TOP LEFT: Jim Adams during his first presentation. CENTRE LEFT: Handing over Jim’s speaker prize. BOTTOM LEFT: Lynnette, Anja and Lorenzo in conversation on Sunday morning. TOP RIGHT: Alex, the overall winner of the Pub Quiz, receiving his prize from Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Snorre surveying the proceedings.

The number of beginners at the telescopes on Saturday evening was disappointing but I am hoping it was the sudden drop in temperature that convinced them to stay indoors.

Paul’s star trails arch over the telescope area.
Paul’s star trails arch over the telescope area.

Lorenzo’s talk on Sunday morning. “The public face of SKA in South Africa” was reasonably well attended and, after some discussion, the great dispersal began and the site emptied fairly rapidly. This year, though, more people stayed on to observe the partial solar eclipse on Sunday afternoon.

TOP: My series of photographs following the solar eclipse with a late afternoon shot of Leeuwenboschfontein from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke’s very artistic shot of the shadows cast by the people around the telescope. BOTTOM RIGHT: A picture of the sun through one of Chris’s filters.
TOP: My series of photographs following the solar eclipse with a late afternoon shot of Leeuwenboschfontein from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke’s very artistic shot of the shadows cast by the people around the telescope. BOTTOM RIGHT: A picture of the sun through one of Chris’s filters.

Dwayne and Claire, who got engaged during the 11th SSP at Night Sky Caravan Farm, missed the 12th SSP because they were getting married. Now, while attending the 13th SSP, Mr and Mrs Engelbrecht announced they were expecting their first child. I suppose it will be too much to expect them to call the baby SSP, but it would be nice if they would.

On Monday morning we packed up and after Calla had very professionally helped close of and dust proof the gaping hole where the Vito’s rear window had been, Lynnette, Snorre and I also left for home.

Outreach at Labiance Primary School: Friday 23rd of September 2016.

This outing started on the 10th of September when we were setup on the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront (this link will take you to a page where you can read more about our monthly outings there). Gert van Lill an educator and Head of Department at Labiance Primary School (this is the school’s web page) was visiting the Waterfront and asked us if we could do something at the school as well. After hours activities would be difficult, so we settled on solar viewing and a small poster display. He undertook to discuss the arrangements with the school and we would then settle on a date. We have had this same enthusiasm many, many times before, only to have it dissipate over time as it became entangled in logistics and imagined difficulties, so we did not let our expectations get out of hand. Gert, however, was serious and before long we had a date, the logistics were sorted out and we had identified the display and viewing area at the school.

TOP: Setting up and Lynnette enjoys the coffee so kindly brought out by Mrs. Mfika. BOTTOM LEFT: Mrs Mfika who originally hails from the same part of the Eastern Cape (now KwaZulu Natal) as I do - Matatiele. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mrs Thebus, who runs the tuck shop.
TOP: Setting up and Lynnette enjoys the coffee so kindly brought out by Mrs. Mfika. BOTTOM LEFT: Mrs Mfika who originally hails from the same part of the Eastern Cape (now KwaZulu Natal) as I do – Matatiele. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mrs Thebus, who runs the tuck shop.
TOP: Each group was given a quick run-through about solar safety, what they would see through the telescope, sunspots and renewable energy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Either Lynnette or I did the telescope bit depending on who had the camera. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Learners were encouraged to browse the poster display after looking through the telescope. BOTTOM: There were lots of questions and most were good ones.
TOP: Each group was given a quick run-through about solar safety, what they would see through the telescope, sunspots and renewable energy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Either Lynnette or I did the telescope bit depending on who had the camera. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Learners were encouraged to browse the poster display after looking through the telescope. BOTTOM: There were lots of questions and most were good ones.

So on Friday the 23rd of September Lynnette and I saddled up the Vito and headed for the school just after 07:00. The traffic on the R300 northbound was very heavy but quite reasonable southbound until we got the Van Riebeek Road turnoff when it became bumper to bumper stuff and stayed that way on the R102 all the way to the College Road intersection. Once at the school we parked the Vito and Gert took us in to introduce us to the staff and show us where the essential amenities were. Then out we went and started unloading and setting up.  Gert explained that we would be getting all the learners from grades five to seven in batches from about 08:30 through to 13:00. So we would have just over four hours to do our stuff with just over 400 learners (431 to be exact) and their educators but bear in mind we would be out in the full sun for the entire period.  It was clearly going to a long hot morning but then solar viewing exercises are always hot stuff.

TOP: Lorenzo, the 10-inch Dobsonian, is a veteran of many such encounters and knows that all viewers come to telescopes that wait patiently. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Although some of the learners were on the short side we never needed the ladder which I had remembered to bring along this time. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Time constraints meant that requests for having a second look could not really be accommodated. BOTTOM: Learners really used the time available to look quite closely at the posters we had on display.
TOP: Lorenzo, the 10-inch Dobsonian, is a veteran of many such encounters and knows that all viewers come to telescopes that wait patiently. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Although most of the learners were tall enough we did need the ladder (which I fortunately remembered to bring along) for one or two of them. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Time constraints meant that requests for having a second look could not really be accommodated. BOTTOM: Learners really used the time available to look quite closely at the posters we had on display.
TOP: Whatever I was saying seemed to have their attention. BOTTOM: The time available did not allow us to answer all the learners had; not even nearly.
TOP: Whatever I was saying seemed to have their attention. BOTTOM: The time available did not allow us to answer all the learners had; not even nearly.
TOP: Gert (far right) brought his group around too and I hope delivery was to his satisfaction. SECOND FROM THE TOP: There was a slight overlap when a second group, accompanied by Ms. Van der Heyde, arrived but the more the merrier we say. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The learners were all very patient while waiting their turn at the eyepiece. BOTTOM: Those who had been at the telescope first obviously had the most time to examine the posters which was a bit unfair on the tail-enders.
TOP: Gert (far right) brought his group around too and I hope delivery was to his satisfaction. SECOND FROM THE TOP: There was a slight overlap when a second group, accompanied by Ms. Van der Heyde, arrived but the more the merrier we say. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The learners were all very patient while waiting their turn at the eyepiece. BOTTOM: Those who had been at the telescope first obviously had the most time to examine the posters which was a bit unfair on the tail-enders.

The hospitality at the school was fantastic. Mrs Mfika brought us coffee shortly after our arrival and later in the morning Mrs Thebus brought is soft drinks, pies, samosas and two chocolate bars. The educators were all very friendly and interested. The school is neat and very well run. The educators that accompanied the various groups of learners were always in control and I was impressed by the general quality of the question the learners asked and also by their general knowledge. The security is top notch and we never ever had the slightest qualms about our belongings possibly being relocated. We have been to a fair number of schools over the course of the last eight years and Labiance really stands out. The school deserves a pat on the back and a good round of applause because it is doing a great job. Congratulations to all concerned and we look forward to a return visit, possibly even an evening session with the Moon and the stars.

TOP: Lynnette managed to get this lot to all point at the sun. Well, almost all because we have Mister Poser up front striking a pose. SECOND FROM THE TOP: I am not entirely sure where the handbag and cuddly bear fit in but then I have never really understood ladies accessories. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Somebody remarked that they thought the Sun would be a “wow” object. How can we make it that? A better, more exciting image, or a more exciting verbal delivery, or both? BOTTOM: The posters drew attention from every group and yes, once a poser always a poser.
TOP: Lynnette managed to get this lot to all point at the sun. Well, almost all because we have Mister Poser up front striking a pose. SECOND FROM THE TOP: I am not entirely sure where the handbag and cuddly bear fit in but then I have never really understood ladies accessories. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Somebody remarked that they thought the Sun would be a “wow” object. How can we make it that? A better, more exciting image, or a more exciting verbal delivery, or both? BOTTOM: The posters drew attention from every group and yes, once a poser always a poser.
TOP: Lynnette even managed to get Ms van der Heyde to point at the Sun but there were . SECOND FROM THE TOP: Telescope time for this lot was almost over. SECOND FROM THE TOP: An animated group around the posters. This lot were especially interested in the dwarf planets. BOTTOM: How far is outer space was a bit of a “wow” fact for most of the learners and their educators.
TOP: Lynnette even managed to get Ms van der Heyde to point at the Sun but there were no special posers in this group. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Telescope time for this lot was almost over. SECOND FROM THE TOP: An animated group around the posters. This lot were especially interested in the dwarf planets. BOTTOM: How far is outer space was a bit of a “wow” fact for most of the learners and their educators.
TOP: No sun-pointing but they were no less enthusiastic than their predecessors. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The weather was weird because the sun was hot but the wind was decidedly chilly. SECOND FROM THE TOP: No not a sit-in. This group just found it easier to read the lower posters when seated rather than standing. BOTTOM: How far is outer space raises quite a few eyebrows, yet again.
TOP: No sun-pointing but they were no less enthusiastic than their predecessors. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The weather was weird because the sun was hot but the wind was decidedly chilly. SECOND FROM THE TOP: No not a sit-in. This group just found it easier to read the lower posters when seated rather than standing. BOTTOM: How far is outer space raises quite a few eyebrows, yet again.

Last but not least a very big thank you to Gert van Lill for his initiative, the invitation and the very well organized and smoothly run event.

TOP: Sun-pointing with no fewer than four enthusiastic posers. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Educator up first for a peak at the Sun. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lynnette explaining some of the finer points of sunspots. BOTTOM: Using a poster of the Sun to shield viewer from the Sun. Is that fighting fire with fire?
TOP: Sun-pointing with no fewer than four enthusiastic posers. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Educator up first for a peak at the Sun. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lynnette explaining some of the finer points of sunspots. BOTTOM: Using a poster of the Sun to shield viewer from the Sun. Is that fighting fire with fire?
TOP: There does not quite seem to be consensus about exactly where the Sun is in this group. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Answering questions about renewable energy efforts in South Africa. SECOND FROM THE TOP: While the group gathers around me one learner is given firm pointers as to where the line is and how to toe it. BOTTOM: That is the last showing of “How far is outer space” for today folks.
TOP: There does not quite seem to be consensus about exactly where the Sun is in this group. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Answering questions about renewable energy efforts in South Africa. SECOND FROM THE TOP: While the group gathers around me one learner is given firm pointers as to where the line is and how to toe it. BOTTOM: That is the last showing of “How far is outer space” for today folks.

Solar Eclipse – Monday the 13th of September 2015

Well, there we were with ringside seats and a cloudy sky.  Thin high-level clouds which would not have been too much of a problem and thicker, fast-moving low-level clouds moving in ahead of a cold front. It was the low-level lot that was a problem because a gap would hardly have opened up when it was promptly closed up again. Despite the adverse conditions I did manage to get several photographs of the partially eclipsed sun.

These were the weather conditions one had to contend with while trying to photograph the eclipse.
These were the weather conditions one had to contend with while trying to photograph the eclipse.

I have put the time each photograph was taken in the caption so that one gets some idea of the progression of the eclipse.  All the photographs were taken with a Nikon D5100 camera mounted at prime focus on a Newtonian reflector (D=250), ISO 400 and shutter speed = 0.25 seconds.

This was the first clear shot I got at 07:26:04.80
This was the first clear shot I got at 07:26:04.80
Here the sun just started peeping out behind the clouds at 07:32:49.00
Here the sun just started peeping out behind the clouds at 07:32:49.00
A little bit more of the sun showing at 07:39:10.60
A little bit more of the sun showing at 07:39:10.60 and the first sunspot appears
Here the sun was almost clear of the clouds at 07:44:11.80
Here the sun was almost clear of the clouds at 07:44:11.80 and we have a second sunspot
Almost no  clouds and it looked as if we might get quite a large gap at 07:50:21.90
Almost no clouds here and it looked as if we might get quite a large gap at 07:50:21.90 with two definite sunspots
Just a faint hint of clouds at 07:52:22.50
Just a faint hint of clouds at 07:52:22.50
Back the clouds came at 08:00:00.90
Back the clouds came at 08:00:00.90
This was pretty much the end of my eclipse section at 08:20:38.40
This was pretty much the end of my eclipse section at 08:20:38.40
By 09:11:07.40 the clouds opened up a large gap just to notify me that the eclipse was over before closing in again
By 09:11:07.40 the clouds opened up a large gap just to notify me that the eclipse was over before closing in again and one can now see five sunspots

 

Solar Eclipse – 03 November 2013

Solar eclipse:  Like the Curry Cup, unfortunately not for Cape Town.

The Northern parts of South Africa will be able to see some of the action somewhere between shortly after 15:00 and just before 17:00.  The actual times and how much of the eclipse you will see depend on exactly where you are.

For more information you can visit the Johannesburg Planetarium’s general webpage or go directly to their graphic representation. NASA has a general eclipse website with comprehensive information on past and future eclipses.  There is a good animation you can view at this UK site or you can go to the Facebook page covering the event. Kos Coronaios and the Soutpansberg Astronomy club will also be covering the event at their monthly stargazing event in Louis Trichard.  If you are in that area go to their Facebook page for more information.

Please remember that you must not look directly at the sun with the naked eye.  Sunglasses, no matter how state of the art they are, old x-ray plates, glass smoked black with a candle, pieces of green wine bottles or any one of the multitude of home made devices, are all inadequate.  Using them could leave you, and especially your children, with permanent damage that might only manifest itself long after the event.