Leeuwenboschfontein with Klaas and Wilma: Wednesday 02nd to Monday 07th March 2016.

Klaas contacted us in May 2015 about the Summer Southern Star Party in 2016 (go here to read more about the event). Unfortunately the dates in February did not fit in with their travel plans so they could not attend and we decided to organize a mini-substitute for them at Leeuwenboschfontein instead.

Lynnette, Snorre and I left for Leeuwenboschfontein (LBF) (click here to read more about LBF or visit their Facebook page here) on Wednesday the 02nd of March and settled in. Iain and Willem arrived the following day, while Auke, Barry & Miemie, Alan & Rose, Louis and Corné & his family, all arrived on the Friday. Klaas & Wilma also arrived on Friday having driven 400km from Olive Grove (go here to read more about Olive Grove), just south of Beaufort West, where they had spent a few days stargazing.

Lynnette and I got in some valuable stargazing time on the Wednesday and Thursday evenings and on the Friday evening we all traipsed down to the stargazing enclosure as there were three non-astronomical groups camping as well, and we could not switch off the lights at the ablution block. Louis set up outside the enclosure because it was easier than carrying everything inside and he is used to working off the back of his pick-up. Inside the enclosure we had our 12”, Alan and Rose had their 12” and Corné had his 8” (all Dobbies). Auke hadn’t brought a telescope and set himself up to do binocular viewing while Klaas had his refractor. Klaas compiled an excellent time lapse of the activity inside the enclosure during the course of the evening.

We will at some stage have to do something about making the access from the runway to the enclosure smoother for transporting the telescopes as it is quite tricky, even with headlamps. The light colour of the vibracrete walls also acts as a reflective surface on the inside of the enclosure and significantly raises the ambient light levels. We will have to consider applying a matt black paint at some stage to solve that problem.

TOP LEFT: An early morning moon rising out of the clouds and sporting a nice Earthshine (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VRII f/3.5-5.6G; 200mm, ISO 1000, 2s, f/5.6). TOP RIGHT: Dragonfly – This one is a male Red-veined Dropwing (Trithemis arteriosa). MIDDLE: On Saturday afternoon we were treated to a display of rainbows and I was just too late to capture the moment when there were three (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 400, 1/80s, f/8). BOTTOM LEFT: An impressive cloud formation to the west of the camp (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VRII f/3.5-5.6G; 18mm, ISO 800, 1/2s, f/4.5). BOTTOM RIGHT: Lights along the driveway leading to the guesthouse and the reception with just a touch of red on the right from Laingsburg’s lights and the green dot is NOT a UFO (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 1000, 6s, f/1.8).
TOP LEFT: An early morning moon rising out of the clouds and sporting a nice Earthshine (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VRII f/3.5-5.6G; 200mm, ISO 1000, 2s, f/5.6). TOP RIGHT: Dragonfly – This one is a male Red-veined Dropwing (Trithemis arteriosa). MIDDLE: On Saturday afternoon we were treated to a display of rainbows and I was just too late to capture the moment when there were three (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 400, 1/80s, f/8). BOTTOM LEFT: An impressive cloud formation to the west of the camp (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VRII f/3.5-5.6G; 18mm, ISO 800, 1/2s, f/4.5). BOTTOM RIGHT: Lights along the driveway leading to the guesthouse and the reception with just a touch of red on the right from Laingsburg’s lights and the green dot is NOT a UFO (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 1000, 6s, f/1.8).
Laingsburg is 90 km away as the proverbial crow flies but when there are low clouds over there it makes its presence known by the orange glow of the lights along the N1 through the town. (Nikon D5100, 80mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 1000, 6s, f/1.8)
Laingsburg is 90 km away as the proverbial crow flies but when there are low clouds over there it makes its presence known by the orange glow of the lights along the N1 through the town. (Nikon D5100, 80mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 1000, 6s, f/1.8)
TOP LEFT: The Earth’s shadow and Venus’s girdle across the eastern horizon as seen from the campsite (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VRII f/3.5-5.6G; 18mm, ISO 800, 1/13s, f/6.3). TOP RIGHT: An earlier photograph of the sunlight and shadows to the north-east of Leeuwenboschfontein which also caught some birds in the evening sky. BOTTOM LEFT: Star trails taken from the camp with the camera pointed just west of the south celestial pole (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 1000, 10s, f/1.5; 249 exposures assembled with StarStax-0.71). BOTTOM RIGHT: Crux (the Southern Cross) showing the colour variation in the main stars making up the constellation and also the dark nebula known as the Coal Sack (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 2500, 8s, f/1.8 & enlarged and then cropped with Photoscape).
TOP LEFT: The Earth’s shadow and Venus’s girdle across the eastern horizon as seen from the campsite (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VRII f/3.5-5.6G; 18mm, ISO 800, 1/13s, f/6.3). TOP RIGHT: An earlier photograph of the sunlight and shadows to the north-east of Leeuwenboschfontein which also caught some birds in the evening sky. BOTTOM LEFT: Star trails taken from the camp with the camera pointed just west of the south celestial pole (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 1000, 10s, f/1.5; 249 exposures assembled with StarStax-0.71). BOTTOM RIGHT: Crux (the Southern Cross) showing the colour variation in the main stars making up the constellation and also the dark nebula known as the Coal Sack (Nikon D5100, AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G; 50mm, ISO 2500, 8s, f/1.8 & enlarged and then cropped with Photoscape).

On Saturday the weather turned nasty. We had windy conditions with gusts that at times threatened to lift the roof off the shelter over our caravan. Thanks to Willem’s intervention and the quick reaction of the LBF’s staff the roof was nailed down properly before any damage was done. Poor Snorre was very upset, firstly by the clanging of the loose galvanized sheeting in the wind and then by the sound of hammering on the roof. Later on we also had some light rain and that evening we all got together in the lapa for a braai. Klaas was dying to show us his technique for photographing bright planets and stars during the daytime but there was never a long enough break in the weather to do that. At the Star Party in 2017 will be the ideal opportunity Klaas.

TOP: From left to right: Iain Finlay, Willem van Zyl, Alan & Rose Cassells, Lynette and I, Louis Fourie, Klaas van Ditzhuyzen and Barry Dumas. BOTTOM LEFT: Barry & Miemie. BOTTOM CENTRE: Iain, Rose & Alan and Rose, Alan & myself and Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Miemie & Wilma in the foreground.
TOP: From left to right: Iain Finlay, Willem van Zyl, Alan & Rose Cassells, Lynette and I, Louis Fourie, Klaas van Ditzhuyzen and Barry Dumas. BOTTOM LEFT: Barry & Miemie. BOTTOM CENTRE: Iain, Rose & Alan and Rose, Alan & myself and Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Miemie & Wilma in the foreground.
Our supper, three Kasslertjops and four Pofadders.
Our supper, three Kassler chops and four Pofadders.
TOP LEFT: Klaas van Ditzhuyzen our Dutch visitor. TOP RIGHT: Louis Fourie from Worcester in a pensive mood. BOTTOM LEFT: Barry & Miemie Dumas visiting our caravan on Sunday evening. BOTTOM RIGHT: Barry, Miemie & Auke and a rare view of Auke’s tongue.
TOP LEFT: Klaas van Ditzhuyzen our Dutch visitor. TOP RIGHT: Louis Fourie from Worcester in a pensive mood. BOTTOM LEFT: Barry & Miemie Dumas visiting our caravan on Sunday evening. BOTTOM RIGHT: Barry, Miemie & Auke and a rare view of Auke’s tongue.

On Sunday Corné and Alan & Rose departed but the weather remained overcast. It eventually cleared by midnight for a short period till around 03:00 on Monday morning. On Monday everyone except Iain and Willem packed up and left for home.

Klaas and Wilma continued their South African trip and their next stop was Elgin Valley Inn in Grabouw. They had another stop in Tulbagh before departing for the Netherlands again on the 18th of March.

Thank you to everyone who attended the event but a special word of thanks to Klaas and Wilma. It was a pleasure to meet you and to share the night sky with you. Thank you especially Klaas for you astronomy input and we hope to see you at the Southern Star Party early in 2016. You might want to visit here or go here and possibly visit here to see some of the astronomy things Klaas does. His Leeuwenbosch material can be viewed here and he also produced a time-lapse video of the activity during an observing session in the “Sterretjieskraal”, which can be viewed here.

Snorre enjoyed the weekend as usual, except for the banging on the roof on Saturday.

TOP LEFT: Somewhere down there among all that green stuff should be at least one mouse and all I have to do is find it. TOP RIGHT: Out there looks a very promising hunting prospect, but there is a large dry watercourse and a road to cross, so maybe not today. BOTTOM LEFT: Let’s go and investigate the frog situation at the dam. BOTTOM RIGHT: Not nearly dark enough for hunting yet, so I’ll lie down and wait.
TOP LEFT: Somewhere down there among all that green stuff should be at least one mouse and all I have to do is find it. TOP RIGHT: Out there looks a very promising hunting prospect, but there is a large dry watercourse and a road to cross, so maybe not today. BOTTOM LEFT: Let’s go and investigate the frog situation at the dam. BOTTOM RIGHT: All this walking is tiring and it’s not nearly dark enough for hunting yet, so I’ll lie down and wait.