Unihedron Sky Quality Meter, Error Identification and Elimination

Background

This Unihedron Sky Quality Meter (Ser. No. 5739 / Mod. 2.17) has been used over a six-year period at various venues in South Africa. I noted that the first four to six readings in every series of measurements we took drifted lower before stabilizing. My revised operating procedure discards the first four reading in every series and this has virtually eliminated the initial drift of earlier measuring sessions. My results showed and still show inexplicable outliers which have a negative impact on the error profile of the results produced. By mounting the unit on a tripod and making sure it is level and exactly vertical instead of operating it while hand-held, I have reduced the number of outliers but not eliminated them.

  1. Experiment 1.

The results of the first experiment were obtained at Bergwater Lodge (-33°39’47.06″, 20°00’44.13″, 501m) near Montagu. The objective was to see if the readings taken with the Sky Quality Meter at the zenith (0°) and at 30° and 60° down from 0°, toward each cardinal direction varied and, if they varied, by how much. In experiment 1 the meter was hand-held.

  1. Results for Experiment 1.
The readings toward the east (E30°) and West (W30°) were consistently similar and both sets were slightly better (darker) than the zenith readings. The values toward the North (N30°) and south (S30°) were consistently less dark than the East & West readings with the N30° readings slightly better (darker) than the S30° ones. I have no explanation for the outlier in the S30°set.
The readings toward the east (E30°) and West (W30°) were consistently similar and both sets were slightly better (darker) than the zenith readings. The values toward the North (N30°) and south (S30°) were consistently less dark than the East & West readings with the N30° readings slightly better (darker) than the S30° ones. I have no explanation for the outlier in the S30°set.
The E30° readings were darker than either the 0° readings or the W30° ones. The W30° readings were marginally less dark than the 0° values. The values for N30° were quite close to the other values but not quite as dark and S30° was noticeably different and again the lowest (least dark) of the five sets.
The E30° readings were darker than either the 0° readings or the W30° ones. The W30° readings were marginally less dark than the 0° values. The values for N30° were quite close to the other values but not quite as dark and S30° was noticeably different and again the lowest (least dark) of the five sets.
The E60° readings were darker than either the 0° readings or the W60° ones and both sets were darker than the 0° values. The values for N60° and S60° were quite close to the other values but not quite as dark, however, all the different sets were much closer together than in Figures 1 and 2.
The E60° readings were darker than either the 0° readings or the W60° ones and both sets were darker than the 0° values. The values for N60° and S60° were quite close to the other values but not quite as dark, however, all the different sets were much closer together than in Figures 1 and 2.
The E30° readings were darker than either the 0° readings or the W30° ones. The W30° readings and the 0° values are very close to each other. The values for N30° and S30° were also quite close together but, in this case, the N30° values were marginally less dark than the S30° ones.
The E30° readings were darker than either the 0° readings or the W30° ones. The W30° readings and the 0° values are very close to each other. The values for N30° and S30° were also quite close together but, in this case, the N30° values were marginally less dark than the S30° ones.
The W60° readings were now the darkest ones followed by the E60° ones. The 0° readings and the S60° values are hardly distinguishable with the N60° values just slightly lighter.
The W60° readings were now the darkest ones followed by the E60° ones. The 0° readings and the S60° values are hardly distinguishable with the N60° values just slightly lighter.
Depiction of the % difference between zenith (0°) readings and other values.  Zenith values were taken as 100% so negative values indicate series of readings that were higher (darker) than zenith readings.
The depiction of the % difference between Zenith (0°) readings and other values. Zenith values were taken as 100% so negative values indicate series of readings that were higher (darker) than zenith readings.
  1. Discussion of Experiment 1.

The results in Figures 1 to 6 show that the values given by the Sky Quality Meter do differ at the different cardinal points and also at 30° and 60 ° down from the zenith (0°). At both 30° and 60°, the readings were darker toward the west and east than at 0° and less dark toward the north and south.

In order to illustrate the differences more clearly, the Sky Quality Readings were calculated as a percentage of the value obtained for the zenith (0°) and these results are depicted in Figure 7 (above). Here it is clear that W30°, E30°, W60° & N60° readings were consistently darker than the readings at 0° (average -0.4222) while those for N30°, S30°, N60° & S60° were lighter by a larger margin (average 0.8175).

  1. Future Planning.

One set of results is not enough to draw any general conclusions from and I suspect the results will vary from site to site. In all probability, they will also vary from season to season for the same site as the position of objects in the sky changes seasonally. I will select a suitable site and repeat the test at three monthly intervals over the course of one year.

  1. Experiment 2.

The values in the second experiment were obtained at the SAAO Hostel near Sutherland (-32°22’35.29″, 20°48’18.56″, 1703m). I wanted to verify that my Unihedron Sky Quality Meter’s readings were consistent at 0° when the instrument was rotated 90° between consecutive readings around the vertical axis. In experiment 2 the meter was tripod-mounted and the tripod was set to level and vertical using a spirit level.

  1. Results for Experiment 2.
The two sets of south/north (S/N) -readings are consistently darker than the west/east (W/E) -readings. Despite the three outliers, the two sets of S/N-readings lie quite close together as do the two sets of W/E readings.
The two sets of south/north (S/N) -readings are consistently darker than the west/east (W/E) -readings. Despite the three outliers, the two sets of S/N-readings lie quite close together as do the two sets of W/E readings.
  1. Discussion of Experiment 2.

From these results, it appears that the Unihedron Sky Quality Meter I use does, in fact, give different readings in the two 90° orientations around the vertical axis that were tested. Even if one takes into consideration the three outlier values the S/N values are consistently darker than the W/E values. It seems possible to produce quite different sets of values, and therefore draw different conclusions depending on how the instrument is orientated around the vertical axis.

  1. Future Planning.

I will repeat the test using all four possible 90° orientations around the vertical axis. On that occasion, it will hopefully have the time to take two or three sets of readings on the same evening and also to repeat all of them on two or more consecutive evenings.

Astronomy Outreach & Guiding Course/Workshop, SAAO Sutherland: Friday 21st to Saturday 22nd April 2017.

When the subject of this course came up both Auke and I immediately asked “Why didn’t we finish this thing long ago” and he was right we should have done it when we first talked about it three or more years ago. Well, it was too late for tears now and we had to get stuck in and get it done.  We discovered that we had actually done a lot of the spade word back then and produced a very good basic framework. What we now needed to do was to put flesh on the bare bones and tweak a few things here and there.

That is exactly what we did and on the 20th of April we set off in the Vito for Sutherland. Lynnette and Snore stayed at home because there is a “no pets” rule in the hostel at the SAAO in Sutherland so Snorre would not have been able to come with us.  Lynnette, very unwillingly, accepted the role of a cat sitter.

We arrived latish on Thursday the 20th at the hostel. After greeting Cedric, Sivuyile and Thembela in the dining room we transferred all our stuff from the Vito into our rooms and then went outside with coffee to appreciate the dark skies. I took a set of darks sky readings about which I will give some feedback later.

TOP: A dead tree silhouetted against the red glow of the setting sun in the west. CENTRE: In the east, the night approaches across the Karoo landscape. BOTTOM: Auke, taking pictures of the standing stones.
TOP: A dead tree silhouetted against the red glow of the setting sun in the west. CENTRE: In the east, the night approaches across the Karoo landscape. BOTTOM: Auke, taking pictures of the standing stones.

Next morning it was breakfast at 07:30 and shortly after 08:00 we were at the Visitors Centre to set up in the library. The group for the course/workshop was:
Anthony Mitas (SAAO, Sutherland)
Cedric Jacobs (SAAO, Cape Town)
Claudine Vernooi (SAAO, Sutherland)
Francois Klein (SAAO, Sutherland)
Jeremy Stuurman (SAAO, Sutherland)
Sivuyile Manxoyi   (SAAO, Cape Town)
Thembela Mantungwa (SAAO, Cape Town)
Willem Prins (SAAO, Sutherland)

I am not going to give a blow by blow account of the course content or the progress in the class.  That will be done in official reports. None of the attendees were entirely inexperienced except perhaps Francois and he made up for that in enthusiasm. People like Cedric, Sivuyile and Willem all had a great deal of experience and the others all had varying degrees of experience.

TOP: The prominent dark blue earth shadow receding in the west accompanied by the pink of the Venus Girdle ahead of the approaching daylight. CENTRE: Morning sunlight flooding across the hills casting deep shadows in the valleys. BOTTOM: SALT, done for the night and the contrails of a passing plane catching the sunlight.
TOP: The prominent dark blue earth shadow receding in the west accompanied by the pink of the Venus Girdle ahead of the approaching daylight. CENTRE: Morning sunlight flooding across the hills casting deep shadows in the valleys. BOTTOM: SALT, done for the night and the contrails of a passing plane catching the sunlight.

Our approach was that this was a workshop during which we would all learn from each other and we encouraged everyone to share experiences right from the word go.  Everyone did exactly that throughout the two days and the result was a very positive learning experience for all concerned.

As far as outreach was concerned it quickly became apparent that there were too few people on the ground to handle the number of schools and the vast number of learners that had to be reached.  As far as the essential follow-up of visits it was very clear that there was simply no chance of doing this at the frequency required to make it effective.  In the Northern Cape, the numbers problem was further complicated by the distances between towns and the condition of the roads.

Taken all together the group had a large combined pool of experience. One of the energetically debated points was the problems experienced during outreach and stargazing sessions. Some of these problems originated from the belief systems people adhere to while others are the result of misrepresentations by science quacks and a small percentage can be attributed to genuine ignorance. Although some of these situations can be amusing all of them require tact to resolve as they all have the potential to damage science and our reputations as presenters. The bottom line was that as outreach practitioners we are all also at the forefront of science education to the public at large and to learners.

On the both the Friday and Saturday evenings we had practical sessions.  Friday evening we did not use telescopes but rather concentrated on constellations and easy activities like finding satellites as predicted by appropriate software applications.

TOP: Me talking with Sivuyile and Thembela listening against the backdrop of one of the shelves in the SAAO library in Sutherland. Out of the picture are Anthony, Francois, Cedric, Claudine, Jeremey and Willem. CENTRE: The group around the Lorenzo, our workhorse 10”Dobsonian, with the SALT dome in the distance and bright Arcturus also making it into the field of view. BOTTOM: Auke’s longer exposure showing short star trails and a flurry of activity around the telescope.
TOP: Me talking with Sivuyile and Thembela listening against the backdrop of one of the shelves in the SAAO library in Sutherland. Out of the picture are Anthony, Francois, Cedric, Claudine, Jeremey and Willem. CENTRE: The group around the Lorenzo, our workhorse 10”Dobsonian, with the SALT dome in the distance and bright Arcturus also making it into the field of view. BOTTOM: Auke’s longer exposure showing short star trails and a flurry of activity around the telescope.

The Saturday session at the telescopes was quite an eye opener for us. There was so much enthusiasm and an incredible participatory spirit.  It sounded more like a party than a stargazing practical. Make no mistake there was a lot of serious astronomy and learning taking place at the same time but in such a good spirit and everyone wanted to contribute or help wherever necessary.

The Ghost of Venus took the longest to find but eventually, that was also laid to rest.  Willem’s attempts to keep everyone going till Sagittarius rose into the sky were eventually thwarted by a combination of a dropping temperature and overall fatigue.

What a pleasure to work with a group like this and a big thank-you to each and every one of you.

On Sunday Morning Auke and I talked Willie into showing us around the new 1-meter Telescope and giving us a brief overview of what was new up on the hill.  Thanks, Willie! After that Auke and I hit the road considerably later than we had planned but we still had one stop to make.

TOP LEFT: The 1-metre telescopes pedigree. I am very curious to see which name the SAAO will select from the many entries that they received. TOP CENTRE: View from the “front”. TOP RIGHT: View from the “back” and Auke can be seen in the lower right of the photograph photographing something in the basement. BOTTOM LEFT: The secondary mirror. BOTTOM CENTRE: Willie Koorts took this photograph of me looking up at the secondary. BOTTOM RIGHT: Willie looking very relaxed against the backdrop of the dome.
TOP LEFT: The 1-metre telescopes pedigree. I am very curious to see which name the SAAO will select from the many entries that they received. TOP CENTRE: View from the “front”. TOP RIGHT: View from the “back” and Auke can be seen in the lower right of the photograph photographing something in the basement. BOTTOM LEFT: The secondary mirror. BOTTOM CENTRE: Willie Koorts took this photograph of me looking up at the secondary. BOTTOM RIGHT: Willie looking very relaxed against the backdrop of the dome.
TOP: The 1.9 meter on the right and on the left the 11 meter SALT, CENTRE: Auke’s very artistic photograph of the telescopes at the SAAO site as seen through the protective dome of the all-sky measuring equipment. BOTTOM: In the centre of the photograph is the dome (apparently there will be a second one) of a private (French) enterprise on Klipkraal just west of the SAAO.
TOP: The 1.9 meter on the right and on the left the 11 meter SALT. CENTRE: Auke’s very artistic photograph of the telescopes at the SAAO site as seen through the protective dome of the all-sky measuring equipment. BOTTOM: In the centre of the photograph is the dome (apparently there will be a second one) of a private (French) enterprise on Klipkraal just west of the SAAO.

In the Verlatenkloof Pass, the old Toll House has been bought by a long time resident of Paarl, Tjol Herbst. No not Lategan, he was the rugby player. This Tjol moved to the Karoo after his retirement on the advice of his doctor because of his asthma. We stopped off there for a very interesting chat and a cold beer. Pay the man a visit, it is quite an education.

TOP: The old Tollhouse in Verlatenkloof Pass now belongs to this gentleman, Tjol Herbst. 2nd FROM TOP: In the background the old stables of the Tollhouse and in the foreground the caravans that constitute Tjol’s living space. 2nd FROM BOTTOM: Myself and Tjol on the stoep of his unique pub with the partially finished ablution block in the background. BOTTOM: Tjol behind his bar counter in the tiny but very welcoming bar.
TOP: The old Tollhouse in Verlatenkloof Pass now belongs to this gentleman, Tjol Herbst. 2nd FROM TOP: In the background the old stables of the Tollhouse and in the foreground the caravans that constitute Tjol’s living space. 2nd FROM BOTTOM: Myself and Tjol on the stoep of his unique pub with the partially finished ablution block in the background. BOTTOM: Tjol behind his bar counter in the tiny but very welcoming bar.

After visiting Tjol we were finally on our way home which was uneventful except for two stops to buy fruit. The one at Veldskoen was a disappointment because their grapes were sold out so we stopped at the Seekoeipadstal, which had ample stock. After dropping Auke off in Somerset West I finally got to Brackenfell.

Children’s Birthday Party: Thursday 06th of April 2017.

This was an event with a difference. Jeanne’s daughter, Jade, had her birthday the previous day and this was a camp-out party on their very nice property in the shadow of Table Mountain near Kirstenbosch. We found the address easily and our summary of the property from Google Earth was quite accurate except that the oak trees on the eastern side were higher than we had estimated which made viewing Jupiter a problem.

Patience let us in and helped us to decide on where to park the car. I then carried Lorenzo and all the other gear to the area we had chosen to set up and got everything organised.  We had promised to bring each partygoer a light pollution booklet, an eclipse viewer and a set of solar system stickers. Auke was going to bring the personalise Southern Star Wheels and also show the girls how to assemble and use them as well as do the what’s up. I had just finished setting up when Auke phoned to say that he was about six minutes away (right on schedule) when he discovered he had left the Star Wheels at home. At that point, he was already heading back to Somerset West to fetch them and would we please adapt the program and carry on without him.

TOP: The very pleasant and relaxed environment of Jeanne’s home with Table Mountain in the background and the tops of the white tents for the camp-out birthday party visible just behind the tennis court. BOTTOM: Lorenzo, the 10”Dobsonian at attention in the foreground and all the usual paraphernalia for observing arranged on the table next to him.
TOP: The very pleasant and relaxed environment of Jeanne’s home with Table Mountain in the background and the tops of the white tents for the camp-out birthday party visible just behind the tennis court. BOTTOM: Lorenzo, the 10 inch Dobsonian at attention in the foreground and all the usual paraphernalia for observing arranged on the table next to him.

Auke had also phoned Jeanne to inform her of the hiccup so we decided to get the girls to look at the moon, which was clearly visible while it got dark enough, to actually do a what’s up.  At this point, we noticed the wisps of cloud coming over the mountain and slowly spreading away from it towards us. Using the time honoured ostrich tactics of sticking your head in the telescope and pretending you don’t see the clouds, we lined the girls up and did several rounds of moon viewing.  When the moon lost its allure the girls went back to the tents and collected blankets and other warm stuff before gathering around the fire.

Lynnette had already given the handouts to Jeanne but I took a little time to explain the use of the eclipse viewer stressing all the usual things about never looking at the sun with the unprotected eyes.  I also stressed the fact that one should never look at the sun through binoculars or telescopes or through a camera unless the equipment was equipped with a proper solar filter.

TOP LEFT: The line of excited partygoers eager for a peek at the moon above the trees in the background. TOP RIGHT: Despite the fact that it wasn’t cold yet, at least I didn’t think so, some of the girls were already wrapped in sleeping bags. BOTTOM LEFT: With the girls gathered around the fire I described the use of the solar glasses while also doing a brief explanation of what we might be able to see. At his stage, the clouds spilling back over Table Mountain were reducing what we might see very rapidly. BOTTOM RIGHT: We had forgotten our ladder for the dimensionally challenged people, which was fine except for one customer and a chair turned out to be adequate for her.
TOP LEFT: The line of excited partygoers eager for a peek at the moon above the trees in the background. TOP RIGHT: Despite the fact that it wasn’t cold yet, at least I didn’t think so, some of the girls were already wrapped in sleeping bags. BOTTOM LEFT: With the girls gathered around the fire I described the use of the solar glasses while also doing a brief explanation of what we might be able to see. At his stage, the clouds spilling back over Table Mountain were reducing what we might see very rapidly. BOTTOM RIGHT: We had forgotten our ladder for the dimensionally challenged people, which was fine except for one customer and a chair turned out to be adequate for her.

I then gave a short talk and a brief what’s up but by that time the clouds had already covered part of Orion and Lepus and were making their way slowly toward Canis Major. Crux was still open as was most of the southern sky and the moon. Jupiter was still stuck behind the oaks when Auke pitched and did his thing with the Southern Star Wheel and it was still there by the time he had finished his little show.

Jeanne indicated that the girls now had other activities to attend to so there would be no waiting for Jupiter. Having done what we came to do we packed up and left, shepherded out again by a very friendly Patience.

MENSA at Stellenzicht Winery: Saturday 11th of March 2017.

Auke arranged the Stargazing for MENSA with Yvonne, the Winelands Mensan-In-Chief. He had already presented talks to them on two previous occasions but roped Lynnette and I in for this event because more people were expected and it made sense to have more telescopes available.

The show was to take place at Stellenzicht Winery and the weather did not look good as lots of clouds and even rain was forecast. When we arrived there were lots of clouds spilling over the Helderberg, Haelkop and Stellenbosch Mountain and being driven along by a fairly strong and decidedly chilly southerly wind. We had decided to opt for the two Celestron telescopes “Little Martin” and the “One armed Bandit” partially for space reasons in the cars with the Vito temporarily out of commission and partially to benefit from their automatic finding and tracking ability. I found that in the very windy conditions Lorenzo the 10” Dobsonian would have been a more stable option.

TOP: For this outing we decided to use the 5”Celestron aka “The One Armed Bandit” (OAB). Partially because Lorenzo plus rocker box is a tight fit in the Polo and we were forced to use the Polo as a result of the mishap the Vito had suffered at the SSP.  2nd FROM TOP: Me doing what’s up for the assembled guests using Yvonne’s very nifty portable PA system.  2nd FROM BOTTOM:  A view of some of the guests.  BOTTOM: Myself, the guests and the Stellenzicht Winery in the background.
TOP: For this outing, we decided to use the 5” Celestron aka “The One Armed Bandit” (OAB). Partially because Lorenzo plus rocker box is a tight fit in the Polo and we were forced to use the Polo as a result of the mishap the Vito had suffered at the SSP. 2nd FROM TOP: Me doing what’s up for the assembled guests using Yvonne’s very nifty portable PA system. 2nd FROM BOTTOM: A view of some of the guests. BOTTOM: Myself, the guests and the Stellenzicht Winery in the background.

As soon as it was reasonably dark I gave a short talk and a brief what’s up before we got round to showing various objects and talking. The tall oaks to the east kept the moon out of sight till almost closing time which was a pity because the light spill from the winery lights reduced the number of objects we could realistically see quite drastically.

TOP: A late afternoon shot of the guests taken by Auke.  CENTRE: Another early evening shot of the guests taken by Auke from the balcony of the winery.  BOTTOM: The OAB against the backdrop of an illuminated winery wall and myself chatting to two guests who stayed quite late.
TOP: A late afternoon shot of the guests taken by Auke. CENTRE: Another early evening shot of the guests taken by Auke from the balcony of the winery. BOTTOM: The OAB against the backdrop of an illuminated winery wall and myself chatting to two guests who stayed quite late.

The evening was a reasonable success and thanks go to Yvonne for organising the evening and also for the hospitality and the red wine to keep the chill away. We did not have rain as predicted and the clouds were confined to the mountains and their immediate surroundings but we certainly had wind in abundance.  Better luck next time.

Daniel Academy in Gordon’s Bay: Monday 06th of March 2017.

Auke got the request and, although it followed hard on the heels of the Helderberg expedition on Saturday we agreed to do the outing, mainly because it was only to be a small group of learners but also because we were curious about the Daniel Academy. Anyway, on Monday evening we set off nice and early from Auke’s place to find the Academy which is situated on Sir Lowry Road between Gordon’s Bay and the N2, but closer to the N2.

We arrived well ahead of the organisers but once they arrived we were directed to a nice open area with no serious obstructions and we set up. Auke did the what’s up and then we set about doing some astronomy by showing the moon and a variety of celestial objects.  The site is actually darker than expected so we had more on offer than one normally has in the urbanised Hottentots’ Holland basin.

TOP: All setup and the first guests setting up too. “Little Martin” on the left and Lorenzo to the right, both ready for action, with the mountains behind Gordon’s Bay forming the skyline. BOTTOM: Myself in conversation with one of the staff at the Daniel Academy.
TOP: All setup and the first guests setting up too. “Little Martin” on the left and Lorenzo to the right, both ready for action, with the mountains behind Gordon’s Bay forming the skyline. BOTTOM: Myself in conversation with one of the staff at the Daniel Academy.

I had some interesting discussions with a few of the teachers and especially with the “Headmaster”.  I won’t go into those discussions here but recommend you the website given earlier in this post to find out more.  We left fairly early as the wind turned chilly and not everyone was prepared for the downturn in the temperature.

Friends of the Helderberg Nature Reserve: Saturday 04th of March 2017.

After our previous bad luck with the weather at the Helderberg Nature Reserve, we were holding thumbs that history would not repeat itself. Fortunately, it didn’t and we could actually show people things in the sky other than clouds.

This eager young viewer quickly got the hang of the control pad on “Little Martin” and under Auke’s watchful eye set about finding the moon.
This eager young viewer quickly got the hang of the control pad on “Little Martin” and under Auke’s watchful eye set about finding the moon.

Auke, Lynnette and I pitched nice and early followed shortly by Wendy and we all promptly set about setting up the telescopes in preparation for the arrival of the Friends of the Helderberg nature Reserve later on. Wendy set up her 8” Dobsonian and Auke set up the Celestron nicknamed “Little Martin” while Lynnette and I set up the other Celestron known as the “One Armed Bandit”. Both Celestrons were automated and we hoped to gain time and make life easier by not having to adjust all the time to follow an object, as is the case with a Dobsonian.  Although there are definite advantages to using an automated telescope as opposed to a good old push-and-tug Dobsonian I found that with the 5” instrument I had it was less stable and did not give me the clarity and brightness I was used to on our workhorse, Lorenzo the 10” Dobsonian. I will definitely investigate other uses for the Celestron but at present, I have my doubts when it comes to general outreach.  Watch this space is I believe the expression to use.

TOP LEFT: Auke and I setting up. Lorenzo stayed at home and the “One Armed Bandit” was out in the field with Auke’s “Little Martin”. CENTRE LEFT: Myself and Auke sort out last minute details. BOTTOM LEFT: Some of the picnickers were quick to latch onto the opportunity to do some viewing even if the event wasn’t really for them. TOP RIGHT: Wendy’s 8” Dobsonian drew immediate attention. BOTTOM RIGHT: Wendy and a small crowd of enthusiastic potential viewers.
TOP LEFT: Auke and I setting up. Lorenzo stayed at home and the “One Armed Bandit” was out in the field with Auke’s “Little Martin”. CENTRE LEFT: Myself and Auke sort out last minute details. BOTTOM LEFT: Some of the picnickers were quick to latch onto the opportunity to do some viewing even if the event wasn’t really for them. TOP RIGHT: Wendy’s 8” Dobsonian drew immediate attention. BOTTOM RIGHT: Wendy and a small crowd of enthusiastic potential viewers.

There were still day picnickers around and when the children spotted the telescopes they made a beeline for us before we had time to set up properly. As soon as we were up and running we let them look at the moon to their heart’s content.  Auke even had on eager little lass trained up in no time to operate the control paddle of his telescope; I was less adventurous. As the picnickers trickled away the Friends of the Helderberg Nature Reserve ) started arriving and setting up their picnics.

TOP: The Friends of the Helderberg Nature Reserve starting to arrive, well equipped for the evening’s picnic and dressed appropriately in case the temperature dropped. 2nd FROM TOP: The Moon was up so we could view that before it got dark enough to do a what’s up. 2nd FROM BOTTOM: While some looked at the moon others enjoyed a leisurely picnic. BOTTOM: Edward presenting the what’s up.
TOP: The Friends of the Helderberg Nature Reserve starting to arrive, well equipped for the evening’s picnic and dressed appropriately in case the temperature dropped. 2nd FROM TOP: The Moon was up so we could view that before it got dark enough to do a what’s up. 2nd FROM BOTTOM: While some looked at the moon others enjoyed a leisurely picnic. BOTTOM: Edward presenting the what’s up.

By the time it was dark enough to do a what’s up tonight most of them had looked at the moon.  I kept my introduction as short as possible and steadily increased the number of stars and constellations as the gathering dark allowed us to see more of them.

TOP: Wendy and the 8” getting some photographic exposure. CENTRE: One advantage of using the OAB is that one does not have to keep adjusting to keep the object in the eyepiece. I still prefer Lorenzo despite the convenience of the OAB. BOTTOM: Auke and “Little Martin” in the background while the two ladies on the right evaluate the setup.
TOP: Wendy and the 8” getting some photographic exposure. CENTRE: One advantage of using the OAB is that one does not have to keep adjusting to keep the object in the eyepiece. I still prefer Lorenzo despite the convenience of the OAB. BOTTOM: Auke and “Little Martin” in the background while the two ladies on the right evaluate the setup.

After the talk, it was back to the telescopes and we spent the rest of the evening until packing up time around 21:45 showing various objects and talking about whichever astronomy questions were put to us.  All in all, it was a very pleasant and enjoyable evening with fair weather, very little wind and nice people.

Thanks to the Friends for the invitation and we are very glad the weather gods viewed our little get together favourably this time round.

The 13th Southern Star Party. The first to be held at Leeuwenboschfontein: Wednesday 22nd of February to Monday 27th February 2017.

The first Southern Star party held at Leeuwenboschfontein was a success. So, any suspicions about unlucky 13 were neatly sidestepped or perhaps the jinx only applies to people who suffer from triskaidekaphobia.

TOP: The barn with the display tables on the left, the lecture area in the centre and the kitchen on the right. 2nd FROM TOP: Our pull-up banners and some of the posters. 2nd FROM BOTTOM: This banner is always a showstopper. BOTTOM: The group at the opening.
TOP: The barn with the display tables on the left, the lecture area in the centre and the kitchen on the right. 2nd FROM TOP: Our pull-up banners and some of the posters. 2nd FROM BOTTOM: This banner is always a showstopper. BOTTOM: The group at the opening.

Lynnette, Snorre and I arrived on Wednesday the 22nd, downloaded our stuff at Dalzicht and set about getting the shed converted into a lecture area with a display section. Fortunately, their spacious kitchen made organising the coffee area very easy.

And here we all are. You can figure out who’s who on your own. I gave up putting in the names because we are not standing in nice neat rows and I could not make my list of names match the people in the photograph.
And here we all are. You can figure out who’s who on your own. I gave up putting in the names because we are not standing in nice neat rows and I could not make my list of names match the people in the photograph. Six people could not make it for the group photo.

Who attended:

Jim Adams (speaker), Jonathan Balladon, Deon Begeman, Ronelle Begeman, Steyn Botha, Samuel Botha, Dominique Brink, Johan Brink, Nellie Brink, Anja Bruton, Alan Cassells, Rose Cassells, Pamela Cooper, Chris de Coning, Micah de Villiers, Pierre de Villiers, Barry Dumas, Miemie Dumas, Clair Engelbrecht, Dwayne Engelbrecht, Arné Esterhuizen, Iain Finlay, Edward Foster, Lynnette Foster, Louis Fourie, Maureen Helman, Cheyenne Kersting, Christine Kersting, Harald Kersting, Jamie Kersting, Evan Knox-Davies, Dianne Nxumalo-Kohler, Robin Kohler, Bennie Kotze, Paul Kruger, Lia Labuschagne, Eddy Nijeboer, Jannie Nijeboer, Lorenzo Raynard (speaker), Kim Reitz, Marius Reitz, John Richards, Rogan Roth, Johan Roux (Jnr), (Johan Jnr’s wife), (Johan Jnr’s eldest son), (Johan Jnr’s 2nd son), Alecia Roux, Henda Scott, Barry Shipman, Auke Slotegraaf, Corne van Dyk, and Chris Vermeulen, Alex Wright.

Some of the keen people pitched on Thursday and among them were Deon and Ronelle Begeman. Deon had, as promised at the previous SSP in Bonnievale, constructed two magnificent binocular viewing tripods for Auke and myself.  This is really quite an ingenious device with many improvements over what is currently on the market and it is very reasonably priced too when compared to its competitors. I will do a separate post with pictures about it at a later stage.

What a super way to advertise the Star Party against the backdrop of the busy telescope area and Leeuwenbosch’s starry skies.
What a super way to advertise the Star Party against the backdrop of the busy telescope area and Leeuwenbosch’s starry skies.

On Thursday evening Paul and I went up Swartberg in his 4×4.  It was a whole lot easier than walking up but also considerably more taxing on one’s nerves and I am not implying that Paul drove recklessly; quite the contrary. It is just that the vehicle adopts a wide variety of very unusual angles during both the ascent and descent and one has to trust the driver a whole lot more than when driving down a normal road.

TOP: I cannot recommend a visit to the hut on top of Swartberg strongly enough. This shot shows the hut in the first rays of the rising sun. CENTRE: looking east down the Nouga Valley in the early morning with smoke from the extensive veldt fires packed in the valleys. BOTTOM: Early morning looking south-west from the hut. The Langeberg lies on the far horizon and the tiny white spike of a microwave tower is just visible at the top of Rooiberg Pass.
TOP: I cannot recommend a visit to the hut on top of Swartberg strongly enough. This shot shows the hut in the first rays of the rising sun. CENTRE: looking east down the Nouga Valley in the early morning with smoke from the extensive veldt fires packed in the valleys. BOTTOM: Early morning looking south-west from the hut. The Langeberg lies on the far horizon and the tiny white spike of a microwave tower is just visible at the top of Rooiberg Pass.
Christine took this from the lawn in front of De Oude Opstal just to prove that Paul and I had been on top of Swartberg. Thanks Christine for sharing.
Christine took this from the lawn in front of De Oude Opstal just to prove that Paul and I had been on top of Swartberg. Thanks Christine for sharing.

TOP LEFT: We had some magnificent thunderclouds on Thursday. TOP RIGHT: Paul snapped his first lightning bolt from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM LEFT: Paul’s night shot of the Leeuwenbosch complex from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM RIGHT: Paul’s early morning shot of the hut and his pickup.

TOP LEFT: We had some magnificent thunderclouds on Thursday. TOP RIGHT: Paul snapped his first lightning bolt from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM LEFT: Paul’s night shot of the Leeuwenbosch complex from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM RIGHT: Paul’s early morning shot of the hut and his pickup.

Arne and Alex had their vehicle expire on the R318 while on the way to the SSP, but they were picked up by Evan and brought to Leeuwenboschfontein. The two seemed pretty laid back about leaving the car at the side of the road until Monday when they would set about sorting it out from Cape Town.

TOP: The group attending Deon’s presentation. BOTTOM: Deon and his very good representation of the Milky Way.
TOP: The group attending Deon’s presentation. BOTTOM: Deon and his very good representation of the Milky Way.

The beginner’s session at the telescopes was quite successful on Friday as was the beginners talk on Saturday morning.

TOP LEFT: How much traffic is there in the telescope area during a star party. This tangle of lights against the star trails in the background, as captured by Auke, should give you a good indication. TOP RIGHT: Taken from a different perspective by Auke and showing the south celestial pole very nicely is a second view of the telescope area. BOTTOM LEFT: A less cluttered short exposure of the telescope area showing Leo rising in the east. BOTTOM RIGHT: There are some very rare beings prowling the telescope area at night, as this shot would seem to prove. In real life, Eddy is not nearly as daunting I assure you.
TOP LEFT: How much traffic is there in the telescope area during a star party. This tangle of lights against the star trails in the background, as captured by Auke, should give you a good indication. TOP RIGHT: Taken from a different perspective by Auke and showing the south celestial pole very nicely is a second view of the telescope area. BOTTOM LEFT: A less cluttered short exposure of the telescope area showing Leo rising in the east. BOTTOM RIGHT: There are some very rare beings prowling the telescope area at night, as this shot would seem to prove. In real life, Eddy is not nearly as daunting I assure you.

Jonathan had to leave suddenly on Saturday morning as he was needed to fly a plane somewhere.  He promised he would flash his landing lights if his route took him over Leeuwenboschfontein which it apparently didn’t.

TOP LEFT: Part of the smallish group. TOP RIGHT: Me demonstrating the Southern Star Wheel. BOTTOM LEFT: Samuel and Steyn. BOTTOM RIGHT: Steyn on the left, John in the background on the right and Henda up front.
TOP LEFT: Part of the smallish group. TOP RIGHT: Me demonstrating the Southern Star Wheel. BOTTOM LEFT: Samuel and Steyn. BOTTOM RIGHT: Steyn on the left, John in the background on the right and Henda up front.

During my beginners’ session on Saturday morning, Jim Adams, retired Deputy Chief Technologist at NASA and Anja Bruton Science Engagement Coordinator at the SKA arrived. The problem was that Lorenzo Raynard Communications Manager at the SKA, who was due to give the first talk had not pitched and all efforts to contact him were unsuccessful. Jim, hearing of our predicament, very kindly agreed to give the talk he was scheduled to give that afternoon in Lorenzo’s slot. So we started off with “Spinoff: How investing in astronomy and space science changes life on Earth”. Jim proved to be every bit as good a speaker as Anja had said he was; relaxed, knowledgeable and very good at fielding questions too.

In the meantime, Lynnette and Anja were frantically trying to trace Lorenzo.

Martin Lyons and his wife Pat flew in (literally) especially for the social braai in the lapa at the campsite during lunchtime on Saturday.  They stayed until after lunch and then flew home again. According to Paul and Louis, the takeoff was actually quite tense but Martin, during subsequent discussions, downplayed any suggestion of problems.

Just before the braai the Vito was attacked by a vicious tree and lost its back window.

The Vito was the victim of an unfortunate incident just before the braai on Saturday when it was attacked by one of the vicious trees at Leeuwenboschfontein.
The Vito was the victim of an unfortunate incident just before the braai on Saturday when it was attacked by one of the vicious trees at Leeuwenboschfontein.
TOP LEFT: Eddy and Jannie. TOP CENTRE: Louis and Deon. TOP RIGHT: Cheyenne Kersting CENTRE LEFT: Alex and Arne BOTTOM LEFT: Chris de Coning RIGHT: Micah and Auke.
TOP LEFT: Eddy and Jannie. TOP CENTRE: Louis and Deon. TOP RIGHT: Cheyenne Kersting CENTRE LEFT: Alex and Arne BOTTOM LEFT: Chris de Coning RIGHT: Micah and Auke.
TOP: Corné hard at work. CENTRE: A relaxed group outside with Alan and Rose who drove through to visit for the day. Thanks, guys! BOTTOM: Is Louis explaining where to find the stars? We will have to ask Bennie.
TOP: Corné hard at work. CENTRE: A relaxed group outside with Alan and Rose who drove through to visit for the day. Thanks, guys! BOTTOM: Is Louis explaining where to find the stars? We will have to ask Bennie.
TOP LEFT: Claire and Dwayne relaxing. TOP 2nd FROM LEFT: Barry and Miemie. TOP 2nd FROM RIGHT: A Cape Centre group tucking in. CENTRE LEFT: Alan’s version of the Polynesian fire poi possibly needs some practice. CENTRE: Myself, Lynnette and Jim. CENTRE RIGHT: Kim and Marius. BOTTOM LEFT: The Kerstings. BOTTOM RIGHT: Micah and Chris.
TOP LEFT: Claire and Dwayne relaxing. TOP 2nd FROM LEFT: Barry and Miemie. TOP 2nd FROM RIGHT: A Cape Centre group tucking in. CENTRE LEFT: Alan’s version of the Polynesian fire poi possibly needs some practice. CENTRE: Edward, Lynnette and Jim. CENTRE RIGHT: Kim and Marius. BOTTOM LEFT: The Kerstings. BOTTOM RIGHT: Micah and Chris.
TOP LEFT: Chris. TOP CENTRE: Jannie and Eddy. TOP RIGHT: Henda. CENTRE: Lia and Paul. BOTTOM LEFT: Lia. BOTTOM CENTRE: Evan and Jim. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan and Rose.
TOP LEFT: Chris. TOP CENTRE: Jannie and Eddy. TOP RIGHT: Henda. CENTRE: Lia and Paul. BOTTOM LEFT: Lia. BOTTOM CENTRE: Evan and Jim. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan and Rose.

By now Lorenzo had been traced and was on his way but would not make it in time for his time slot. We, or at least Anja, talked Jim into giving a second talk in Lorenzo’s slot. This talk “Robots in Space and Space Exploration; Past, Present and Future” went down very well with the audience.  Lorenzo finally pitched later on Saturday afternoon. As his talk would cut into observing time we decided to rather have him give his talk on Sunday morning.

After Jim’s talk and the lively question session we took the usual group photograph and, as is usual, some people did not pitch up. People who were absent were Jonathan Balladon, Steyn & Samuel Botha, Dominique & Nellie Brink and Lorenzo Raynard.

The group photograph was followed by the Pub Quiz which, this year, was orchestrated the usual degree of malevolence and cunning by Auke.  After several gruelling rounds the overall winner, by a very large margin was Alex.  Well done Alex, you left several past winners staggering around in your slipstream’s dust.

TOP LEFT: Jim Adams and during his first presentation. CENTRE LEFT: Handing over Jim’s speaker prize. BOTTOM LEFT: Lynnette, Anja and Lorenzo in conversation on Sunday morning. TOP RIGHT: Alex, the overall winner of the Pub Quiz, receiving his prize from Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Snorre surveying the proceedings.
TOP LEFT: Jim Adams during his first presentation. CENTRE LEFT: Handing over Jim’s speaker prize. BOTTOM LEFT: Lynnette, Anja and Lorenzo in conversation on Sunday morning. TOP RIGHT: Alex, the overall winner of the Pub Quiz, receiving his prize from Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Snorre surveying the proceedings.

The number of beginners at the telescopes on Saturday evening was disappointing but I am hoping it was the sudden drop in temperature that convinced them to stay indoors.

Paul’s star trails arch over the telescope area.
Paul’s star trails arch over the telescope area.

Lorenzo’s talk on Sunday morning. “The public face of SKA in South Africa” was reasonably well attended and, after some discussion, the great dispersal began and the site emptied fairly rapidly. This year, though, more people stayed on to observe the partial solar eclipse on Sunday afternoon.

TOP: My series of photographs following the solar eclipse with a late afternoon shot of Leeuwenboschfontein from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke’s very artistic shot of the shadows cast by the people around the telescope. BOTTOM RIGHT: A picture of the sun through one of Chris’s filters.
TOP: My series of photographs following the solar eclipse with a late afternoon shot of Leeuwenboschfontein from the top of Swartberg. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke’s very artistic shot of the shadows cast by the people around the telescope. BOTTOM RIGHT: A picture of the sun through one of Chris’s filters.

Dwayne and Claire, who got engaged during the 11th SSP at Night Sky Caravan Farm, missed the 12th SSP because they were getting married. Now, while attending the 13th SSP, Mr and Mrs Engelbrecht announced they were expecting their first child. I suppose it will be too much to expect them to call the baby SSP, but it would be nice if they would.

On Monday morning we packed up and after Calla had very professionally helped close of and dust proof the gaping hole where the Vito’s rear window had been, Lynnette, Snorre and I also left for home.

Visit to Leeuwenboschfontein with Anton, Camilla, Viljé and Birk: Monday 30th of January 2016 to Tuesday 31st January 2017.

Anton, Camilla and Viljé stayed on until early February after the rest of the group left on the 15th of January. They moved from Kolping guest house to our place in Brackenfell.  Initially, we were a bit concerned because Camilla has a rather serious cat allergy. This was a serious for us too because it is, after all, is said and done, also Snorre’s home. Fortunately, Lynnette’s thorough cleaning coupled with a few restrictions on Snorre’s movements resulted in Camilla never experiencing any discomfort.

During the extended stay we visited several more wineries but, for Lynnette and I, the highlight of the visit was being able to take them to Leeuwenboschfontein ) for two days.  Lynnette and I stayed in Bergzicht and Anton, Camilla, Birk and Viljé stayed next door in Dalzicht. Viljé absolutely loved the large lawn, the trampoline and the selection of climbing frames.

At Leeuwenboschfontein the highlight for me was walking up Swartberg to the hut and back with Anton, Camilla and Viljé.  We started early at around 07:00 and the climb along the 4×4 track took just over two hours. The distance to walk is a little over 5.5 km during which one gains 300 metres in altitude.  The road is very steep in sections and on the way down one has to take extra care not to slip and fall.  A crucial point to remember is that there is no water en route and none at the top either.

TOP LEFT: Looking South West on the way to the top of the Swartberg at Leeuwenboschfontein. A section of the road can be seen at the bottom centre and left of the photograph. CENTRE LEFT: The hut on top of Swartberg seen from the southeast on the way up. BOTTOM LEFT: Looking northwest from high up on Swartberg. Touws River can be seen in the distance roughly in the middle of the photograph. TOP RIGHT: Looking northeast from the lawn in front of De Oude Opstal on Leeuwenboschfontein at sunset, the dark blue of the earth shadow rests on the distant hills overlaid by the delicate pink of the Venus Girdle. BOTTOM RIGHT: Leeuwenboschfontein has some of the most beautiful sunsets although, like this one seen from the campsite, but the clouds are not welcomed by astronomy minded guests.
TOP LEFT: Looking south-west on the way to the top of the Swartberg at Leeuwenboschfontein. A section of the road can be seen at the bottom centre and left of the photograph. CENTRE LEFT: The hut on top of Swartberg seen from the south-east on the way up. BOTTOM LEFT: Looking north-west from high up on Swartberg. Touws River can be seen in the distance roughly in the middle of the photograph. TOP RIGHT: Looking north-east from the lawn in front of De Oude Opstal on Leeuwenboschfontein at sunset, the dark blue of the earth shadow rests on the distant hills overlaid by the delicate pink of the Venus Girdle. BOTTOM RIGHT: Leeuwenboschfontein has some of the most beautiful sunsets although, like this one seen from the campsite, but the clouds are not welcomed by astronomy minded guests.

On the way back we met Johan Roux, the owner of Leeuwenboschfontein, in his pickup taking guests up to the hut.  He seemed as surprised to encounter us as I was to find him there on a weekday. He is, after all, based in Ceres and has a business to run. On the other hand if you are the boss you can pretty much do as you please I suppose.

TOP LEFT: Camilla and Viljé on top of Swartberg. TOP CENTRE: Anton recording the view from the top of Swartberg. TOP RIGHT: The hut on top of the mountain. RIGHT, 2nd FROM TOP: Jaco’s (very) old rucksack that accompanied us up the mountain. On the next visit Jaco can carry it up himself. RIGHT, 2nd FROM BOTTOM: Zoophycos trace fossils in the Witteberg sediments just below the hut. RIGHT BOTTOM: Ripple traces in the Witteberg sediments. CENTRE BOTTOM: Mud cracks with infilling in the Witteberg sediments. LEFT BOTTOM: Camilla and Viljé on a fairly level stretch on their way down the mountain. CENTRE: Camilla, Anton and Viljé against the backdrop of the hut when we arrived on top of Swartberg.
TOP LEFT: Camilla and Viljé on top of Swartberg. TOP CENTRE: Anton recording the view from the top of Swartberg. TOP RIGHT: The hut on top of the mountain. RIGHT, 2nd FROM TOP: Jaco’s (very) old rucksack that accompanied us up the mountain. On the next visit, Jaco can carry it up himself. RIGHT, 2nd FROM BOTTOM: Zoophycos trace fossils in the Witteberg sediments just below the hut. RIGHT BOTTOM: Ripple traces in the Witteberg sediments. CENTRE BOTTOM: Mud cracks with infilling in the Witteberg sediments. LEFT BOTTOM: Camilla and Viljé on a fairly level stretch on their way down the mountain. CENTRE: Camilla, Anton and Viljé against the backdrop of the hut when we arrived on top of Swartberg.

During the climb up Swartberg Lynnette stayed at the guest house looking after Birk and Snorre. We stayed in contact with each other using our two-way radios just in case the climbing group had some sort of accident or she needed us back in hurry.  The use of the radios was essential because mobile reception is very erratic at Leeuwenboschfontein and we were uncertain if there would be any reception at all while on the mountain.

When the climbing party got back to the guest house at around lunch time, Lynnette and Birk were relaxing on a blanket under one of the trees on the spacious lawn.

TOP LEFT: The waxing crescent moon accompanied by Venus. TOP RIGHT: The Coal Sack Nebula, Crux and a nice section of the surrounding Milky Way. CENTRE: The hut on top of the Swartberg at sunset viewed from the camp. BOTTOM LEFT: Looking northeast Jupiter and Spica are prominent as is the sky glow from Laingsburg 90 km away. BOTTOM RIGHT: To the south west the sky glow from Worcester, De Doorns and, most likely, Cape Town light up the sky.
TOP LEFT: The waxing crescent moon accompanied by Venus. TOP RIGHT: The Coal Sack Nebula, Crux and a nice section of the surrounding Milky Way. CENTRE: The hut on top of the Swartberg at sunset viewed from the camp. BOTTOM LEFT: Looking north-east Jupiter and Spica are prominent as is the sky glow from Laingsburg 90 km away. BOTTOM RIGHT: To the south-west the sky glow from Worcester, De Doorns and, most likely, Cape Town light up the sky.

A slightly negative note in connection with Leeuwenboschfontein was the fact that Joan made us pay full price for Viljé. We subsequently discovered that children under the age of six, which Viljé was at the time, actually stay for free.

Without any further ado here are the pictures to tell the story of a memorable and very pleasant stay.

Norwegian Tour: Tuesday 03rd of January to Sunday 15th January 2017.

Lynnette, Snorre and I had just returned from Leeuwenboschfontein so everything was a bit rushed but finally the big day had arrived; Anton Camilla, Viljé, Birk and Anton’s in-laws were finally due to arrive. We had been looking forward to this visit for a long time and it felt as if they took ages to eventually appear in the arrival hall at Cape Town International. When they eventually did arrive there was so much excitement that nobody took any photographs!  Anyway, we got them to the Kolping Guest House in Durbanville safely after making a detour to our place first because the visitors wanted to see where we lived. We let them take it easy for the rest of the day and on Wednesday we went over the tour itinerary for the rest of their stay.

Thursday the 05th of January we set off bright and early for our 08:30 appointment at Sadie Family Wines in the Aprilskloof on the north-western slopes of the Paardeberg. The winery is situated in the Swartland region and the closest town is Malmesbury. Access to the venue is via unsurfaced roads, which the Vito does not like. We were met by Christine who handed us over to Paul for a most instructive tour of the cellar followed by a well-presented wine tasting. Eden Sadie, the driving force behind Sadie Wines is considered by many to be the enfant terrible of the new generation of Swartland wine architects. He was previously the winemaker during the development of the Spice Route wines at Fairview. His return to grass roots winemaking and the extensive, almost exclusive use of decades old, previously neglected bush vine vineyards to make exceptional wines has caused quite a stir. Most of these vineyards are a long way from the winery too and some are also ungrafted vines which is very unusual considering the fact that grafting pulled the South African wine industry back from the brink of total collapse during the Phylloxera in the late 19th century.

TOP LEFT: The start of the tour and we are all gathered in the shade of a convenient tree to listen to Paul. TOP CENTRE: The oldest building on the property, where it all started. TOP RIGHT: Huge earthenware vats, reminiscent of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves. CENTRE: The Sadie company logo. BOTTOM LEFT: The delightfully cool maturation cellar. BOTTOM CENTRE: We invade the maturation cellar in search of knowledge and lower temperatures. BOTTOM RIGHT: The group enjoys the lower temperature in the cellar because outside it would hit the low 40’s later in the day.
TOP LEFT: The start of the tour and we are all gathered in the shade of a convenient tree to listen to Paul. TOP CENTRE: The oldest building on the property, where it all started. TOP RIGHT: Huge earthenware vats, reminiscent of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves. CENTRE: The Sadie company logo. BOTTOM LEFT: The delightfully cool maturation cellar. BOTTOM CENTRE: We invade the maturation cellar in search of knowledge and lower temperatures. BOTTOM RIGHT: The group enjoys the lower temperature in the cellar because outside it would hit the low 40’s later in the day.
TOP LEFT: Tasting in progress. TOP RIGHT: Tasting requires concentration especially for wines of this high quality. CENTRE: The range of Old Vineyard wines; really something very special. BOTTOM LEFT: The Columella is in a class of its own. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mev Kirsten might be from octogenarian bush vines but she outdoes the younger competitors
TOP LEFT: Tasting in progress. TOP RIGHT: Tasting requires concentration especially for wines of this high quality. CENTRE: The range of Old Vineyard wines; really something very special. BOTTOM LEFT: The Columella is in a class of its own. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mev Kirsten might be from octogenarian bush vines but she outdoes the younger competition with consummate ease.

Next up was Lammershoek, which is quite literally just around the corner from Sadie. In fact, the Sadie setup is on a small piece of property originally purchased from Lammershoek. At Lammershoek Zaine was waiting for us. He first conducted a comprehensive and informative tasting, which included a brief history of Lammershoek and an explanation of the objectives of the new management. After the tasting, he took us on a tour of the cellar. Lammershoek has undergone considerable changes since the introduction of overseas capital in a project spearheaded by German football legend Franz Beckenbauer. Despite all the new innovations and increased capital flow their wines are good but not yet in the same class as those of their much smaller next door neighbour.

TOP LEFT: Lammershoek under the guidance of Franz Beckenbauer is on a new track. TOP RIGHT: The tasting commences in a nice new, modern tasting room. CENTRE: Part of the revamped cellar at Lammershoek. BOTTOM LEFT: The fermentation cellar with its epoxy lined open concrete fermentation vats. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Lynnette busy with an open air language instruction class.
TOP LEFT: Lammershoek under the guidance of Franz Beckenbauer is on a new track. TOP RIGHT: The tasting commences in a nice new, modern tasting room. CENTRE: Part of the revamped cellar at Lammershoek. BOTTOM LEFT: The fermentation cellar with its epoxy lined open concrete fermentation vats. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Lynnette busy with an open air language instruction class.

After Lammershoek we were off to Porseleinberg and Calie Louw and that proved to be quite an expedition, over roads that I would normally not have taken the Vito on. The setting of this small winery on top of the Porseleinberg, amid vineyards belonging to Boekenhoutskloof in Franschhoek, is spectacular with 360-degree panoramic views over the Swartland. The wines were as spectacular as the view, if not more so, and Calie’s laid back style of presentation belies his deep appreciation of wine and knowledge of wine crafting.

TOP LEFT: A very nice piece of polished schist inscribed with the Porseleinberg name but displayed in the Boekenhoutskloof cellars in Franschhoek. CENTRE LEFT: In the cellar which just seems far too small for such a big wine. BOTTOM LEFT: A vertical tasting of several vintages of this exceptional wine led by Calie Louw in person. TOP RIGHT: The Young Guns who have upended wine making in the Swartland – Calie Louw, Eben Sadie, Addie Badenhorst and Chris & Andrea Mullineux, depicted in 2012. BOTTOM RIGHT: The same crew on display in 2013.
TOP LEFT: A very nice piece of polished schist inscribed with the Porseleinberg name but displayed in the Boekenhoutskloof cellars in Franschhoek. CENTRE LEFT: In the cellar which just seems far too small for such a big wine. BOTTOM LEFT: A vertical tasting of several vintages of this exceptional wine led by Calie Louw in person. TOP RIGHT: The Young Guns who have upended wine making in the Swartland – Calie Louw, Eben Sadie, Addie Badenhorst and Chris & Andrea Mullineux, depicted in 2012. BOTTOM RIGHT: The same crew on display in 2013.

An interesting fact and one which is suitable for deep discussions over a bottle of one these excellent wines is the fact that Eben Sadie, Callie Louw and Addie Badenhorst of Badenhorst Family Wines on Kalmoesfontein, where we regrettably did not visit, were all keen surfers in their younger days. I believe Eben at one stage actually considered making it a career choice.

Our next stop, after negotiating the daunting gravel road back to the tarred road near Hermon, was at the established and well known Allesverloren wine estate in Riebeeck West.  We first had a late lunch as everyone was more than just a bit peckish by this stage. Lunch was good but the red wines and presentation of the tasting were both a bit of a letdown. The desert wines, however, were excellent. After the tasting, we returned to the guest house with everyone feeling that Thursday had been a long day.

Friday the 5th saw us make an early start for Hartenberg in the Bottelary area west of Stellenbosch.  There we had a most enjoyable cheese board and light snacks followed by an informative and well-presented tasting of their excellent wines. Hartenberg is probably one of the nicest wineries to visit and the grounds are so well maintained too. Their wines are excellent as well, which makes every visit doubly rewarding. We enjoyed the visit so much that we completely forgot to take any pictures! It is just such a pity they uprooted that Pontac bush vine vineyard of theirs some years ago, such a pity.

Our next stop was for a Fairview Master Tasting, which is always a winner. Good wines, some actually excellent and all very well presented in the tasting by properly trained staff; jolly good show Fairview. From Fairview, we nipped next door to do the Spice Route Lunch and tasting.  The wines were definitely a disappointment after Fairview and they were also presented in a very slap-dash manner which did nothing to enhance the quality of either the wine or the general experience. After the Spice Route, back to the guest house, we all went.

TOP LEFT: Anton, Birk and Viljé. TOP RIGHT: In the tasting room for the Master Tasting at Fairview. CENTRE: The view from the restaurant at Allesverloren across the wheat fields and vineyards toward Gouda, Saron and Nieuwekloof Pass. BOTTOM LEFT: A Mad max type vehicle at Fairview. BOTTOM RIGHT: Gathered for lunch at the Spice Route.
TOP LEFT: Anton, Birk and Viljé. TOP RIGHT: In the tasting room for the Master Tasting at Fairview. CENTRE: The view from the restaurant at Allesverloren across the wheat fields and vineyards toward Gouda, Saron and Nieuwekloof Pass. BOTTOM LEFT: A Mad max type vehicle at Fairview. BOTTOM RIGHT: Gathered for lunch at the Spice Route.

On Saturday the 7th we tackled the V&A Waterfront and the Two Oceans Aquarium followed by supper at Den Anker serviced as usual by the impeccable Patrick.

TOP LEFT: Meal at Colcachio in the Willowbridge Centre with Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda and Harald. TOP RIGHT: Anton and Birk. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé and Birk in the V&A shopping centre. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Birk get all the attention from Harald, Anton and Lynnette. BOTTOM CENTRE: At Den Anker in the V&A waterfront with Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda, Edward and Anton. BOTTOM LEFT: A deep-sea salvage vessel in the Robinson Dry Dock in the Alfred Basin. It was built in 1882 and is the oldest functional dry dock of this type in use anywhere in the world.
TOP LEFT: Meal at Colcachio in the Willowbridge Centre with Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda and Harald. TOP RIGHT: Anton and Birk. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé and Birk in the V&A shopping centre. BOTTOM RIGHT: Viljé and Birk get all the attention from Harald, Anton and Lynnette. BOTTOM CENTRE: At Den Anker in the V&A waterfront with Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Erland, Linda, Edward and Anton. BOTTOM LEFT: A deep-sea salvage vessel in the Robinson Dry Dock in the Alfred Basin. It was built in 1882 and is the oldest functional dry dock of this type in use anywhere in the world.

Sunday the 8th Lynnette and I prepared a meal which we took to the guest house and enjoyed there. We were joined for the occasion by Lenelle and Susan.

TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lynda arrange the spread Lynnette and I prepared for Sunday lunch at Kolping. CENTRE LEFT: Camilla, Anton, Harald, Lenelle, Susan and Lynnette with her back to the camera. BOTTOM LEFT: Yummy! TOP RIGHT: Anton, Lenelle, Susan and Viljé. BOTTOM RIGHT: At Orca we have Camilla, Linda hidden behind her, Erland, Harald, Anton, and Viljé with her back to the Camera and Birk’s head just showing at the bottom of the photograph.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette and Lynda arrange the spread Lynnette and I prepared for Sunday lunch at Kolping. CENTRE LEFT: Camilla, Anton, Harald, Lenelle, Susan and Lynnette with her back to the camera. BOTTOM LEFT: Yummy! TOP RIGHT: Anton, Lenelle, Susan and Viljé. BOTTOM RIGHT: At Orca we have Camilla, Linda hidden behind her, Erland, Harald, Anton, and Viljé with her back to the Camera and Birk’s head just showing at the bottom of the photograph.

On Monday the 09th we were off to Stellenbosch where we started the day at Reynecke Wines. Their organic policy always creates an interesting discussion with visitors and our visit was no exception. Their wines were interesting, some very good in fact and the presentation by Nuschka was one of the best and most professional we encountered on our various visits.

From Reynecke we nipped around the corner to De Toren.  Here the wine crafter, Charles Williams was personally on hand to take us on the tour.  He started in the vineyard explaining their vineyard policy and them we toured the cellar before ending up in the very cosy little tasting room. The tasting was well presented and the tour was very informative and professionally conducted but, although the wines were good they were not really outstanding. After De Toren, we went to Skilpadvlei, which is just down the road, for lunch.

After lunch, we visited Raats Family Wines with great expectations. Unfortunately, the tasting was a bit of a disappointment.  The wines were not well presented and some of them seemed to have been open quite a while. It is really a pity that a presenter, who seems otherwise to be a very informed person, does not take the trouble to ensure that a tasting is properly presented. A sloppy tasting definitely detracts from the quality of the wines even if they are good or even excellent ones.  After Raats we made a beeline for home to rest up for the next day’s wine tasting.

TOP LEFT: Very well presented tasting with Nuschka at Reynecke Wines. TOP CENTRE: A short talk outside with Charles Williams before going into the cellar at De Toren. TOP RIGHT: Inside the lovely cool cellar with its delicious wine aromas at De Toren. CENTRE: Lunch at Skilpadvlei. BOTTOM LEFT: Maturation cellar at de Toren. BOTTOM CENTRE: Tasting at De Toren. BOTTOM RIGHT: Tasting at Raats Family winery.
TOP LEFT: Very well presented tasting with Nuschka at Reynecke Wines. TOP CENTRE: A short talk outside with Charles Williams before going into the cellar at De Toren. TOP RIGHT: Inside the lovely cool cellar with its delicious wine aromas at De Toren. CENTRE: Lunch at Skilpadvlei. BOTTOM LEFT: Maturation cellar at de Toren. BOTTOM CENTRE: Tasting at De Toren. BOTTOM RIGHT: Tasting at Raats Family winery.

Tuesday the 10th saw us back in the Stellenbosch area and our trip started at the well respected Kanonkop estate. Lynnette and I, being the designated drivers, stayed outside while the rest of the crew went inside to do the tasting. The tasting was apparently a bit of a disappointment because it is very commercialised.  One apparently has to have at least ten people for a proper tasting but we were not informed about this when we phoned to make our reservation and that is simply slipshod administration. Nevertheless, their wines are good, in fact very good but the overall impression would have been better with a more personalised tasting for our overseas visitors.

TOP LEFT: Standing tasting at Kanonkop. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette with Viljé and Birk under the oaks at Kanonkop. BOTTOM: Serious concentration for the tasters.
TOP LEFT: Standing tasting at Kanonkop. TOP RIGHT: Lynnette with Viljé and Birk under the oaks at Kanonkop. BOTTOM: Serious concentration for the tasters.

After Kanonkop we drove to Beyerskloof, who regard themselves as the Pinotage Kings, for a tasting and lunch. The tasting had the same problem as the one at Kanonkop and here to we had not been told of any other arrangements that we could have made when we phoned to enquire about the tastings. Their wines are good and some are excellent but our guests would really liked to have done the tasting blind in a separate tasting area.

TOP: Beyerskloof restaurant from the parking area. BOTTOM LEFT: For those with surplus cash here is one way to spend it, buy a Mendelazar of Beyerskloof Pinotage. BOTTOM RIGHT: The tasters and Lynnette with Birk in the stroller. Here one can see that, like at Kanonkop, one tastes in an open public area.
TOP: Beyerskloof restaurant from the parking area. BOTTOM LEFT: For those with surplus cash here is one way to spend it, buy a Mendelazar of Beyerskloof Pinotage. BOTTOM RIGHT: The tasters and Lynnette with Birk in the stroller. Here one can see that, like at Kanonkop, one tastes in an open public area.

After lunch, the party split up and one group, driven by Lynnette, went looking for diamonds in Stellenbosch while the second group headed for Tokara to taste more wines.  Tokara is a very impressive venue but, as I have experienced before, their tasting presentation is really not up to standard. A tasting where someone slops the wine into your glass then races through a memorised bit of information, spins round and marches off before you have had time to even taste the wine is not a tasting, it is a farce. Add to this the fact that their wines are not as good as they would like to believe they are and Tokara was a disappointment.  After Tokara, we picked up the rest of the party in Stellenbosch and headed for home.

Wednesday the 11th the group did a township tour with Imvuyo Township Tours & Chippa Mbuyiseli Mngangwa.  The group were ecstatic about his punctuality and service delivery. Good work Chippa, I will certainly use you again. Later that afternoon we went to Orca in Melkbos for supper and that was, as always, a worthwhile experience.

Franschhoek was the destination for Anton Erland and I on Thursday the 12th while Lynnette took the ladies to Cape Town where they wanted to do some serious shopping. The first stop in Franschhoek was Boekenhoutskloof, the umbrella company for Porseleinberg.  What a difference though! The place is all glitz, glass and glamour and makes Porseleinberg look like a pauper’s digs. However, their wine quality does not come close to that of Porseleinberg. Some of it is good but the guests did not think there was anything outstanding.

TOP LEFT: The impressive tasting room at Boekenhoutskloof. TOP CENTRE: The serious business of actually deciding which wine to buy. TOP RIGHT: The old mud and stone walls of the cellar. Note the holes drilled by the wasps to hide the caterpillars and spiders they catch as food for the still to be hatched young. BOTTOM: This door leaves no doubt as to where you are.
TOP LEFT: The impressive tasting room at Boekenhoutskloof. TOP CENTRE: The serious business of actually deciding which wine to buy. TOP RIGHT: The old mud and stone walls of the cellar. Note the holes drilled by the wasps to hide the caterpillars and spiders they catch as food for the still to be hatched young. BOTTOM: This door leaves no doubt as to where you are.

Next stop was Haute Cabriére at the foot of the Franschhoek Pass. The tasting was presented in very much the same fashion as the one at Tokara, perhaps a little better, and the wines were good but lacklustre with nothing to write home about. After this disappointment, we headed for Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines with high hopes. On arrival, it was clear that this place has money and spends it. The tasting emporium is impressive and the attention very personal. Lizzie, the presenter, was informative and knowledgeable about a wide range of topics related to the wines we tasted. It might seem like nit-picking, but the amount given to taste was really minuscule compared to all the other tasting we had attended and the speed with which the bottles were whisked away, clearly indicated that there was no chance of tasting anything a second time. Considering that this was one of the more expensive tastings this skimpiness is inexplicable.

TOP LEFT: Anton, Erland and Harald, tasting at Tokara, probably the least professionally presented tasting we had. TOP RIGHT: The tasting and wine purchase area at Tokara. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton and Erland outside Haut Cabriére with which they were also unimpressed. BOTTOM RIGHT: Erland and Anton outside the imposing entrance to the Mullineux Leeu wine emporium in Franschhoek.
TOP LEFT: Anton, Erland and Harald, tasting at Tokara, probably the least professionally presented tasting we had. TOP RIGHT: The tasting and wine purchase area at Tokara. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton and Erland outside Haut Cabriére with which they were also unimpressed. BOTTOM RIGHT: Erland and Anton outside the imposing entrance to the Mullineux Leeu wine emporium in Franschhoek.

After Mullineux and Leeu we were off to La Motte, making it just before closing time. Unfortunately, the proximity to closing time seemed to also have affected the tasting session. It was rushed to the point of being rude and the wines were a disappointment too. If you take somebody’s money for a tasting then, irrespective of how close it is to closing time, the person is entitled to the same quality tasting experience as somebody who rocked up two hours earlier. The highlight of the visit was the bright yellow Ferrari in the parking area; what a machine! We drove home with mixed feelings about Franschhoek and its wines.

Friday the 13th was Anton’s birthday and we started that off with a surprise birthday breakfast at Kolping Guest House and ended the day with a dinner at the Cattle Baron in the Tygervalley Waterfront.

TOP LEFT: The dining hall at Kolping set up for Anton’s 40th birthday. TOP CENTRE: The menu for the birthday breakfast. TOP RIGHT: Charmain’s cupcakes. BOTTOM: Cupcakes on display.
TOP LEFT: The dining hall at Kolping set up for Anton’s 40th birthday. TOP CENTRE: The menu for the birthday breakfast. TOP RIGHT: Charmain’s cupcakes. BOTTOM: Cupcakes on display.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette, Erland, Lynda, Petro, Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. TOP RIGHT: Harald and Anne-Kirsten. BOTTOM LEFT: Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Lynnette, Erland and Linda.
TOP LEFT: Lynnette, Erland, Lynda, Petro, Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. TOP RIGHT: Harald and Anne-Kirsten. BOTTOM LEFT: Deon, Ansie and Ma Peggy. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Lynnette, Erland and Linda.
TOP LEFT: Harald, Birk and Anton Viljé (only her head) and Camilla. TOP RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lenelle, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and Lynnette (back to the camera). CENTRE: Group photo taken by Susan, Front from left to right: Ansie, Viljé, Ma Peggy, Petro, Nadine, 2nd Row from left to right: Linda, Anne-Kirsten, Birk, Camilla, Lynnette, Edward, Lenelle, Back from left to right: Erland, Harald, Anton, Deon, Peter. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton, Birk, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Petro, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy (hidden) and Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lynnette, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Anton, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy, Edward, Birk.
TOP LEFT: Harald, Birk and Anton Viljé (only her head) and Camilla. TOP RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lenelle, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and Lynnette (back to the camera). CENTRE: Group photo taken by Susan, Front from left to right: Ansie, Viljé, Ma Peggy, Petro, Nadine, 2nd Row from left to right: Linda, Anne-Kirsten, Birk, Camilla, Lynnette, Edward, Lenelle, Back from left to right: Erland, Harald, Anton, Deon, Peter. BOTTOM LEFT: Anton, Birk, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Petro, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy (hidden) and Lynnette. BOTTOM RIGHT: Peter, Freda, Nadine, Susan, Lynnette, Erland, Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Anton, Viljé, Camilla, Linda, Deon, Ansie, Ma Peggy, Edward, Birk.

On Saturday the 14th we went on a short tour of the Peninsula which included only Boulders and Cape Point. At Cape Point, some members of the party walked up to the lighthouse and after that, we drove down to the Cape of Good Hope before going home. Judging by the subdued appearance of the group it looked as if the pace was starting to take its toll

TOP: Anne-Kirsten and Harald make their way down the boardwalk toward the entrance of the Boulders penguin area. 2nd FROM TOP: Waiting for the tickets are Anton, Lynnette, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and over on the far right are Erland and Linda. 2ND FROM BOTTOM: Looking over Simons Bay and False Bay toward Muizenberg. BOTTOM: Penguins, penguins and yet more penguins spread across the beach at Boulders.
TOP: Anne-Kirsten and Harald make their way down the boardwalk toward the entrance of the Boulders penguin area. 2nd FROM TOP: Waiting for the tickets are Anton, Lynnette, Harald, Anne-Kirsten and over on the far right are Erland and Linda. 2ND FROM BOTTOM: Looking over Simons Bay and False Bay toward Muizenberg. BOTTOM: Penguins, penguins and yet more penguins spread across the beach at Boulders.
LEFT: Erland and Linda, TOP RIGHT: Anton and Viljé at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé investigating the marine fauna. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Anne-Kirsten and a uncooperative Birk at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula.
LEFT: Erland and Linda, TOP RIGHT: Anton and Viljé at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula. CENTRE RIGHT: Viljé investigating the marine fauna. BOTTOM RIGHT: Harald, Anne-Kirsten and an uncooperative Birk at the southernmost tip of the Cape Peninsula.

On Sunday the 15th Harald, Anne-Kirsten, Erland and Linda departed for Gauteng from where they would head for the Kruger National Park and spend three days there before flying home to Norway.

TOP: Erland, Linda, Anne-Kirsten and Harald at the Cape Town International Airport prior to departure for Oliver Tambo in Gauteng on their way to the Kruger National Park BOTTOM Last minute selfies and messages before embarking with Harald partially decapitated.
TOP: Erland, Linda, Anne-Kirsten and Harald at the Cape Town International Airport prior to departure for Oliver Tambo in Gauteng on their way to the Kruger National Park BOTTOM: Last minute selfies and messages before embarking with Harald partially decapitated.