Outreach at Labiance Primary School: Friday 23rd of September 2016.

This outing started on the 10th of September when we were setup on the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront (this link will take you to a page where you can read more about our monthly outings there). Gert van Lill an educator and Head of Department at Labiance Primary School (this is the school’s web page) was visiting the Waterfront and asked us if we could do something at the school as well. After hours activities would be difficult, so we settled on solar viewing and a small poster display. He undertook to discuss the arrangements with the school and we would then settle on a date. We have had this same enthusiasm many, many times before, only to have it dissipate over time as it became entangled in logistics and imagined difficulties, so we did not let our expectations get out of hand. Gert, however, was serious and before long we had a date, the logistics were sorted out and we had identified the display and viewing area at the school.

TOP: Setting up and Lynnette enjoys the coffee so kindly brought out by Mrs. Mfika. BOTTOM LEFT: Mrs Mfika who originally hails from the same part of the Eastern Cape (now KwaZulu Natal) as I do - Matatiele. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mrs Thebus, who runs the tuck shop.
TOP: Setting up and Lynnette enjoys the coffee so kindly brought out by Mrs. Mfika. BOTTOM LEFT: Mrs Mfika who originally hails from the same part of the Eastern Cape (now KwaZulu Natal) as I do – Matatiele. BOTTOM RIGHT: Mrs Thebus, who runs the tuck shop.
TOP: Each group was given a quick run-through about solar safety, what they would see through the telescope, sunspots and renewable energy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Either Lynnette or I did the telescope bit depending on who had the camera. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Learners were encouraged to browse the poster display after looking through the telescope. BOTTOM: There were lots of questions and most were good ones.
TOP: Each group was given a quick run-through about solar safety, what they would see through the telescope, sunspots and renewable energy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Either Lynnette or I did the telescope bit depending on who had the camera. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Learners were encouraged to browse the poster display after looking through the telescope. BOTTOM: There were lots of questions and most were good ones.

So on Friday the 23rd of September Lynnette and I saddled up the Vito and headed for the school just after 07:00. The traffic on the R300 northbound was very heavy but quite reasonable southbound until we got the Van Riebeek Road turnoff when it became bumper to bumper stuff and stayed that way on the R102 all the way to the College Road intersection. Once at the school we parked the Vito and Gert took us in to introduce us to the staff and show us where the essential amenities were. Then out we went and started unloading and setting up.  Gert explained that we would be getting all the learners from grades five to seven in batches from about 08:30 through to 13:00. So we would have just over four hours to do our stuff with just over 400 learners (431 to be exact) and their educators but bear in mind we would be out in the full sun for the entire period.  It was clearly going to a long hot morning but then solar viewing exercises are always hot stuff.

TOP: Lorenzo, the 10-inch Dobsonian, is a veteran of many such encounters and knows that all viewers come to telescopes that wait patiently. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Although some of the learners were on the short side we never needed the ladder which I had remembered to bring along this time. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Time constraints meant that requests for having a second look could not really be accommodated. BOTTOM: Learners really used the time available to look quite closely at the posters we had on display.
TOP: Lorenzo, the 10-inch Dobsonian, is a veteran of many such encounters and knows that all viewers come to telescopes that wait patiently. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Although most of the learners were tall enough we did need the ladder (which I fortunately remembered to bring along) for one or two of them. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Time constraints meant that requests for having a second look could not really be accommodated. BOTTOM: Learners really used the time available to look quite closely at the posters we had on display.
TOP: Whatever I was saying seemed to have their attention. BOTTOM: The time available did not allow us to answer all the learners had; not even nearly.
TOP: Whatever I was saying seemed to have their attention. BOTTOM: The time available did not allow us to answer all the learners had; not even nearly.
TOP: Gert (far right) brought his group around too and I hope delivery was to his satisfaction. SECOND FROM THE TOP: There was a slight overlap when a second group, accompanied by Ms. Van der Heyde, arrived but the more the merrier we say. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The learners were all very patient while waiting their turn at the eyepiece. BOTTOM: Those who had been at the telescope first obviously had the most time to examine the posters which was a bit unfair on the tail-enders.
TOP: Gert (far right) brought his group around too and I hope delivery was to his satisfaction. SECOND FROM THE TOP: There was a slight overlap when a second group, accompanied by Ms. Van der Heyde, arrived but the more the merrier we say. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The learners were all very patient while waiting their turn at the eyepiece. BOTTOM: Those who had been at the telescope first obviously had the most time to examine the posters which was a bit unfair on the tail-enders.

The hospitality at the school was fantastic. Mrs Mfika brought us coffee shortly after our arrival and later in the morning Mrs Thebus brought is soft drinks, pies, samosas and two chocolate bars. The educators were all very friendly and interested. The school is neat and very well run. The educators that accompanied the various groups of learners were always in control and I was impressed by the general quality of the question the learners asked and also by their general knowledge. The security is top notch and we never ever had the slightest qualms about our belongings possibly being relocated. We have been to a fair number of schools over the course of the last eight years and Labiance really stands out. The school deserves a pat on the back and a good round of applause because it is doing a great job. Congratulations to all concerned and we look forward to a return visit, possibly even an evening session with the Moon and the stars.

TOP: Lynnette managed to get this lot to all point at the sun. Well, almost all because we have Mister Poser up front striking a pose. SECOND FROM THE TOP: I am not entirely sure where the handbag and cuddly bear fit in but then I have never really understood ladies accessories. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Somebody remarked that they thought the Sun would be a “wow” object. How can we make it that? A better, more exciting image, or a more exciting verbal delivery, or both? BOTTOM: The posters drew attention from every group and yes, once a poser always a poser.
TOP: Lynnette managed to get this lot to all point at the sun. Well, almost all because we have Mister Poser up front striking a pose. SECOND FROM THE TOP: I am not entirely sure where the handbag and cuddly bear fit in but then I have never really understood ladies accessories. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Somebody remarked that they thought the Sun would be a “wow” object. How can we make it that? A better, more exciting image, or a more exciting verbal delivery, or both? BOTTOM: The posters drew attention from every group and yes, once a poser always a poser.
TOP: Lynnette even managed to get Ms van der Heyde to point at the Sun but there were . SECOND FROM THE TOP: Telescope time for this lot was almost over. SECOND FROM THE TOP: An animated group around the posters. This lot were especially interested in the dwarf planets. BOTTOM: How far is outer space was a bit of a “wow” fact for most of the learners and their educators.
TOP: Lynnette even managed to get Ms van der Heyde to point at the Sun but there were no special posers in this group. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Telescope time for this lot was almost over. SECOND FROM THE TOP: An animated group around the posters. This lot were especially interested in the dwarf planets. BOTTOM: How far is outer space was a bit of a “wow” fact for most of the learners and their educators.
TOP: No sun-pointing but they were no less enthusiastic than their predecessors. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The weather was weird because the sun was hot but the wind was decidedly chilly. SECOND FROM THE TOP: No not a sit-in. This group just found it easier to read the lower posters when seated rather than standing. BOTTOM: How far is outer space raises quite a few eyebrows, yet again.
TOP: No sun-pointing but they were no less enthusiastic than their predecessors. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The weather was weird because the sun was hot but the wind was decidedly chilly. SECOND FROM THE TOP: No not a sit-in. This group just found it easier to read the lower posters when seated rather than standing. BOTTOM: How far is outer space raises quite a few eyebrows, yet again.

Last but not least a very big thank you to Gert van Lill for his initiative, the invitation and the very well organized and smoothly run event.

TOP: Sun-pointing with no fewer than four enthusiastic posers. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Educator up first for a peak at the Sun. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lynnette explaining some of the finer points of sunspots. BOTTOM: Using a poster of the Sun to shield viewer from the Sun. Is that fighting fire with fire?
TOP: Sun-pointing with no fewer than four enthusiastic posers. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Educator up first for a peak at the Sun. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lynnette explaining some of the finer points of sunspots. BOTTOM: Using a poster of the Sun to shield viewer from the Sun. Is that fighting fire with fire?
TOP: There does not quite seem to be consensus about exactly where the Sun is in this group. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Answering questions about renewable energy efforts in South Africa. SECOND FROM THE TOP: While the group gathers around me one learner is given firm pointers as to where the line is and how to toe it. BOTTOM: That is the last showing of “How far is outer space” for today folks.
TOP: There does not quite seem to be consensus about exactly where the Sun is in this group. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Answering questions about renewable energy efforts in South Africa. SECOND FROM THE TOP: While the group gathers around me one learner is given firm pointers as to where the line is and how to toe it. BOTTOM: That is the last showing of “How far is outer space” for today folks.

Astronomical Society of Southern Africa Merit Awards 2016

The StarPeople team, consisting of Auke Slotegraaf, Lynnette Foster and myself, are very proud to be able to announce the following:
 
“At the Astronomical Society of Southern Africa’s (ASSA) annual general meeting on 2016 August 17, StarPeople received two awards in recognition of their astronomy outreach efforts. The ASSA Awards Committee (consisting of the ASSA President and two Vice Presidents) issued two Merit Awards, with the citations reading: “for dedicated, innovative and successful outreach initiatives in the Cape Town area which reached at least 8,000 visitors” and “for arranging the highly successful Southern Star Parties, a very effective means of encouraging observation”.
 
StarPeople conduct public outreach promoting science and technology, based around the theme of astronomy, including participation in several National Science Weeks. Their current outreach schedule includes monthly events at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town, running until 2016 December. In 2016 October, StarPeople will host the 12th Southern Star Party, a gathering of stargazing enthusiasts which includes talks by leading speakers, astronomical observation, and sharing & socializing. Further details may be found on http://southernstarparty.org/.”
 
StarPeople would like to thank the ASSA-Awards Committee for this recognition for work done in the past and can ensure them it will serve as encouragement for work we still intend doing in the future. StarPeople also acknowledge the many StarFriends who have participated and assisted over the years; this is your award too.
ASSSA Merit Awards for StarPeople in 2016
ASSA Merit Awards for StarPeople in 2016

Stargazing at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront: Saturday 10th of September 2016.

We had bright sunshine and clear skies but on the way into Cape Town there was a suspicious looking cloud hanging around over the Eastern end of Table Mountain and the Devil’s Peak. I say suspicious because clouds like that, more often than not, are the forerunners of a South-Easter in Cape Town. This proved to be correct in this case although it did not develop into a full scale gale it was cold and a nuisance on the Pierhead.

TOP: There’s that ominous cloud crouching over Table Mountain. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan in action with the Solar Telescope. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Auke lends a hand with the waiting viewers. BOTTOM: Wendy and her brand new telescope. No more pushing and shoving because this little baby can find and track on its own.
TOP: There’s that ominous cloud crouching over Table Mountain. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan in action with the Solar Telescope. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Auke lends a hand with the waiting viewers. BOTTOM: Wendy and her brand new telescope. No more pushing and shoving because this little baby can find and track on its own.

By the time the Noon Day Gun (there is an informative piece on Wikipedia about this Cape Town icon) had sounded we were on site and setting up, followed shortly by Alan and Rose and then by Dirk. Auke and Wendy arrived a bit later. Wendy was just back from gallivanting around England and had brought het new telescope along for its inaugural session. The wind very quickly gave us to understand that today was not a day for banners, or A-frame poster displays. Later on it even toppled our trestles with the A2-framed posters and some of the gusts turned over tables and caused general mayhem. Dirk and Wendy’s smaller telescopes constantly had the jitters and even Alan’s eight inch Dobby and Lorenzo were not completely steady.

TOP: Dirk setting up to show the Moon on the small screen. MIDDLE: Wendy looking slightly perplexed. Did the visitors ask a tricky question? BOTTOM: Alan explaining sunspots.
TOP: Dirk setting up to show the Moon on the small screen. MIDDLE: Wendy looking slightly perplexed. Did the visitors ask a tricky question? BOTTOM: Alan explaining sunspots.
TOP: Alan lining up the telescope for a visitor. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The view from the Pierhead is a colourful one and there is always something going on. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Nelson Mandela Gateway to Robben Island and the iconic red Clock Tower. BOTTOM: Dirk with one of the shorter visitors taking a look at the Moon.
TOP: Alan lining up the telescope for a visitor. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The view from the Pierhead is a colourful one and there is always something going on. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Nelson Mandela Gateway to Robben Island and the iconic red Clock Tower. BOTTOM: Dirk with one of the shorter visitors taking a look at the Moon.

The moon was well up by 13:30 so Dirk could get his scope set on that as he does not have a solar filter for viewing the Sun. The Sun, by the way, was sporting a nice crop of sunspots unlike on our previous outing. I don’t know if it was the wind but the people were disinclined to look through the telescopes and needed quite a bit of coaxing. We eventually tallied up just under 600 visitors but felt that, with the sunshine, we should have had more.

TOP: Alan conducting serious discussions about the Sun and sunspots. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Two of the vessels currently being used to ferry visitors to Robben Island. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The Pilot Boat sets out to help one of the big vessels into the harbour. BOTTOM: Lorenzo and I showing off the Sun and its spots.
TOP: Alan conducting serious discussions about the Sun and sunspots. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Two of the vessels currently being used to ferry visitors to Robben Island. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The Pilot Boat sets out to help one of the big vessels into the harbour. BOTTOM: Lorenzo and I showing off the Sun and its spots.
TOP: A younger visitor gets special attention from Alan. MIDDLE: Lorenzo and I have a visitor interested in the Sun BOTTOM: Dirk helping Wendy sort out her new baby’s teething problems.
TOP: A younger visitor gets special attention from Alan. MIDDLE: Lorenzo and I have a visitor interested in the Sun BOTTOM: Dirk helping Wendy sort out her new baby’s teething problems.

The Chairperson of ASSA’s (Astronomical Society of Southern Africa) Cape Centre, Eddy Nijeboer also paid us a visit. Thanks Eddy it was nice to have somebody from the Cape Centre joining Wendy at the Pierhead. You can go here to find out more about ASSA and visit this page to find out more about the Cape Centre. If you are interested in astronomy please join ASSA or, if you live in Cape Town join the Cape Centre.

Venus was a nice early evening target for a short while and Saturn was well positioned for viewing. The Moon is always a good attraction and never fails to elicit exclamations of surprise, delight or amazement from even the apparently disinterested viewers. Despite what looked like clear skies, it soon became apparent the wind was driving moisture through the atmosphere somewhere above us, because the view through the telescope was just not as crisp as we would have wanted it to be. This wasn’t as visible when looking at the Moon but the effects were quite pronounced when looking at Saturn.

TOP: Alan (on the left) and me with Lorenzo (on the right) during a busy period. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Suddenly Alan and I were quite busy. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Wendy and her new baby with a visitor. BOTTOM: These visitors were very interested and it turns out that they visited our show at the Bonnievale Bonanza two years ago.
TOP: Alan (on the left) and me with Lorenzo (on the right) during a busy period. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Suddenly Alan and I were quite busy. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Wendy and her new baby with a visitor. BOTTOM: These visitors were very interested and it turns out that they visited our show at the Bonnievale Bonanza three years ago.
This gentleman was inebriated. Not staggeringly drunk but definitely surrounded by a naseliferometricaly detectable alcoholic aura and imbued with that characteristic, ethanol induced wisdom. He knew everything, questioned everything loudly and was not shy to advertise his superior knowledge to all and sundry within a radius of at least 25 metres. As if that wasn’t bad enough he then started questioning whatever we said on religious grounds, mocking us and all technology loudly based on his views. A very unpleasant experience indeed and one we could well have done without.
This gentleman was inebriated. Not staggeringly drunk but definitely surrounded by a naseliferometricaly detectable alcoholic aura and imbued with a characteristic, ethanol induced wisdom. He knew everything, questioned everything loudly and was not shy to advertise his superior knowledge to all and sundry within a radius of at least 25 metres. As if that wasn’t bad enough he then started questioning whatever we said on religious grounds, mocking us and all technology loudly based on his views. A very unpleasant experience indeed and one we could well have done without.

After the show we all had coffee at Den Anker served by our favourite waitron, Patrick, before heading home. Go here to find out more about this Belgian restaurant in the Waterfront.

Our future dates at the Waterfront can all be found by visiting (http://www.waterfront.co.za/events/Family/stargazing-at-the-waterfront).

Visit to !Khwa ttu, the San Cultural and Education Centre on Monday the 05th of September 2016.

!Khwa ttu is situated on the R27, about 70 km north of Cape Town. This farm is called Grootwater in Afrikaans probably with reference to the view across the sea. The San name !Khwa ttu means an open expanse of water, like a pan, most likely referring to some of the many pans that collect in winter in the hollows created by the granite outcrops. . Go here to brush up your background on !Khwa ttu.

When Auke, Lynnette, Snorre and I left Brackenfell on Monday morning, the weather did not look promising for the stargazing we had planned to present in the evening. I was going to give a talk after lunch, in which I intended to stress the value of indigenous astronomy and in particular the San-related astronomy. My talk would also include tips and guidelines about presenting astronomy sessions to tourists or visitors in general. To get to !Khwa ttu though, we first had to contend with some serious traffic congestion on the N7. The first was caused by an accident just before the Bosmansdam turn-off and then, for some or other unknown reason, we were rerouted by traffic officials through Parklands down to the R27.

We arrived just before 12:00 and, after reporting to Ri, Magdalena and Shaun, we went over to the restaurant to have lunch. I should add here that Shaun Dunn is a direct descendant of the famous John Robert Dunn. If the name does not ring a bell you can brush up on your history by going here . You can also read more about the interesting modern day legal implications of John Dunn’s activities in this article.

In the foyer of the restaurant we met up with Michael, the MMWC at !Khwa ttu (MMWC = Main Man What Counts ☺) and just managed a few words before he had to shoot off elsewhere. Auke spent some time in the museum before lunch while Lynnette and I had coffee with Snorre relaxing in his favourite window sill next to our table.

TOP: The lecture room with Lynnette at the left front, Shaun Dunn standing on the left and Auke’s hat just visible in the far right background. MIDDLE: Me up front with the trainees listening and hopefully remembering some of the things I said. BOTTOM: View from the front stoep and this is clearly not stargazing weather.
TOP: The lecture room with Lynnette at the left front, Shaun Dunn standing on the left and Auke’s hat just visible in the far right background. MIDDLE: Me up front with the trainees listening and hopefully remembering some of the things I said. BOTTOM: View from the front stoep and this is clearly not stargazing weather.

After lunch we were introduced to the trainees and we also later introduced Snorre to the group, much to their amusement. I discussed the value of indigenous knowledge and specifically indigenous astronomy knowledge. I drove the point home that this knowledge had great value as a cultural possession and that it should never be seen as inferior to modern scientific astronomy interpretations. The ancient astronomy knowledge worldwide is the basis on which later knowledge was able to develop. It is imperative that they remember that overseas guests come to Southern Africa for an African Experience. Their unique cultural astronomy narratives are an intrinsic part of such an experience.

The African knowledge tradition is an oral tradition. However, the social fabric, within which it had efficiently functioned for millennia, has all but disappeared in modern times. This means that the oral histories are disappearing too, as the last bearers of that knowledge pass away. The trainees are in the unique position that they still have access, probably only for short while, to sources of these histories; the ageing storytellers. They have an individual and collective responsibility to collect and record as many of these stories as is possible, before they all became lost.

!Khwa ttu was hosting a large conference so all their accommodation was taken up by the delegates. Michael and Ri had booked us into Elly’s Place, a Bed and Breakfast with a Dutch touch in Darling. Go here to find out more about this interesting and hospitable place to stay. With Ri leading the way we headed for Darling to book in and to have supper. Ri and our host Elly, joined us for supper and after supper we went back to !Khwa ttu where Auke handled the evening session with the trainees.

The clouds had effectively cancelled any stargazing or moon watching so we had to fall back on Auke and Stellarium. Despite the disappointment of not being able to do any stargazing the session was a huge success. Auke and I had our pronunciation of San names neatly torpedoed by the polite giggles of the trainees so we have now submitted a list to Ri and asked her to have the trainees record the correct pronunciation and give us the proper translation at the same time.

TOP: Auke imparting words of astronomical wisdom and, judging by the turned heads, he has the group’s attention. MIDDLE: The group of trainees saying goodbye. BOTTOM: The group without Lynnette who insisted on operating the camera.
TOP: Auke imparting words of astronomical wisdom and, judging by the turned heads, he has the group’s attention. MIDDLE: The group of trainees saying goodbye. BOTTOM: The group without Lynnette who insisted on operating the camera.

After Auke’s session the trainees said thank you and goodbye with a traditional San song, which the three of us appreciated immensely. I say the three of us, because Snorre absolutely hates clapping hands and stamping feet so I had my work cut out to prevent him from heading for the hills during their tribute.

After the evening and the lovely musical send-off Auke, Lynnette, Snorre and I left for Darling. A good night’s rest followed by a hearty breakfast at Elly’s and we set off home via the R27, having been warned by the petrol attendant that the road to Mamre and Atlantis was not in a good condition.

The trip home was uneventful, unlike last year’s one which left us with a broken side-window on the Vito and a repair bill of over R8 000-00.

National Science Week at the Iziko South African Museum in Cape Town: Saturday 06th to Saturday 13th of August 2016.

August in the Western Cape is known for wet, blustery and cold conditions so we were mentally prepared for the worst during National Science Week 2016. However, the weather was uncharacteristically fine except for the last two days. Fortunately for us the Iziko South African Museum (go here to find out more about this exciting venue) allowed us to move inside and use the large open area adjacent to the now non-existent cafe. Thank you Elsabé and Theo for all your efforts on our behalf.

TOP: The boxes of handouts have started to arrive – rather late but at least they have arrived. MIDDLE: Certainly u useful handout but only for teachers. BOTTOM: this was a nice piece to handout but people were quick to spot the fact that it was intended for the 2015 theme.
TOP: The boxes of handouts have started to arrive – rather late but at least they have arrived. MIDDLE: Certainly u useful handout but only for teachers. BOTTOM: this was a nice piece to handout but people were quick to spot the fact that it was intended for the 2015 theme.
TOP: The courier parked in our back yard sorting out our stuff from among the mass of other deliveries. MIDDLE: Very useful handouts and certainly applicable in the South African and indeed Southern African context but the connection with renewable energy was not clear. BOTTOM: Useful information to hand out but difficult to connect to the 2016 theme of renewable energy.
TOP: The courier parked in our back yard sorting out our stuff from among the mass of other deliveries. MIDDLE: Very useful handouts and certainly applicable in the South African and indeed Southern African context but the connection with renewable energy was not clear. BOTTOM: Useful information to hand out but difficult to connect to the 2016 theme of renewable energy.
TOP: Interesting light effects caused by the moisture in the air while on the way to Cape Town. MIDDLE: Getting our setup sorted out against the backdrop of teh very impressive DNA model which formed the basis of the Past All From One Exhibition sponsored by the Standard Bank. It was in the Iziko’s amphitheatre but is on an extended tour of Southern Africa and indeed of Africa. BOTTOM: Banners are going up and telescopes are coming out as we get the show on the road.
TOP: Interesting light effects caused by the moisture in the air while on the way to Cape Town. MIDDLE: Getting our setup sorted out against the backdrop of the very impressive DNA model which formed the basis of the Past All From One Exhibition sponsored by the Standard Bank. It was in the Iziko’s amphitheater but is on an extended tour of Southern Africa and indeed of Africa. BOTTOM: Banners are going up and telescopes are coming out as we get the show on the road.
TOP: Almost ready as a small cloud of mist drifts across the face of Table Mountain. MIDDLE: Johan and Auke sort out the details of the central display table. BOTTOM: The early morning guests start arriving and Alan is ready and waiting at the special Solar Telescope.
TOP: Almost ready as a small cloud of mist drifts across the face of Table Mountain. MIDDLE: Johan and Auke sort out the details of the central display table. BOTTOM: The early morning guests start arriving and Alan is ready and waiting at the special Solar Telescope.

National Science Week had to be move forward by one week due to the local elections. That also caused some problems because we had already started making arrangements and the change meant changing other things as well. The run-up to National Science Week was a also unsettling because our sponsors had organizational problems, which meant that both the funding and the display material were very, very late. Late funding meant that we had to postpone all purchases and rentals until the very last minute which resulted in a lot of frantic rushing around with panic levels going off the scale every now and again. Scary stuff but we made it in one piece although it was really touch and go with some plans having to be partially shelved due to a lack of time to implement them properly.

TOP: Lynnette and Lorenzo fitted with a special Solar Filter service an early guest as Auke gathers his material for distribution on Twitter. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan explains the finer details of the Sun’s role in supplying clean energy. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Johan demonstrating the use of solar energy. BOTTOM: Johan and Auke in conversation with a group of visitors.
TOP: Lynnette and Lorenzo fitted with a special Solar Filter service an early guest as Auke gathers his material for distribution on Twitter. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan explains the finer details of the Sun’s role in supplying clean energy. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Johan demonstrating the use of solar energy. BOTTOM: Johan and Auke in conversation with a group of visitors.
TOP: A constant stream of visitors keeps Alan busy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lynnette explains finer points as Lorenzo points skyward during a short cloudy period. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: As the day warmed up more and more children visited us. BOTTOM: Auke recording for twitter and Lynnette managing the handout table.
TOP: A constant stream of visitors keeps Alan busy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lynnette explains finer points as Lorenzo points skyward during a short cloudy period. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: As the day warmed up more and more children visited us. BOTTOM: Auke recording for twitter and Lynnette managing the handout table.
TOP: A visitor looking at the sun through Lorenzo with the special protective filter clearly visible on the front cover. MIDDLE: Demonstrating the use of the special solar viewing glasses. BOTTOM: A queue waiting for a turn at either the special Solar Telescope or Lorenzo.
TOP: A visitor looking at the sun through Lorenzo with the special protective filter clearly visible on the front cover. MIDDLE: Demonstrating the use of the special solar viewing glasses. BOTTOM: A queue waiting for a turn at either the special Solar Telescope or Lorenzo.
TOP LEFT: Auke explaining solar energy applications. MIDDLE LEFT: Lynnette shielding a visitor from the sun as he looks at the sun through Lorenzo. BOTTOM LEFT: Lynnette and Lorenzo doing their thing. TOP RIGHT: Alan did a lot of very competent explaining. BOTTOM RIGHT: Lynnette even managed to talk two of the municipal workers into taking a look at the sun.
TOP LEFT: Auke explaining solar energy applications. MIDDLE LEFT: Lynnette shielding a visitor from the sun as he looks at the sun through Lorenzo. BOTTOM LEFT: Lynnette and Lorenzo doing their thing. TOP RIGHT: Alan did a lot of very competent explaining. BOTTOM RIGHT: Lynnette even managed to talk two of the municipal workers into taking a look at the sun.
TOP: Rose lending a hand at the Solar telescope. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Visitors examine the material on the handout table. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Johan discussing renewable energy with two younger visitors. BOTTOM: A view from behind of our setup showing the telescopes and the renewable energy table.
TOP: Rose lending a hand at the Solar telescope. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Visitors examine the material on the handout table. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Johan discussing renewable energy with two younger visitors. BOTTOM: A view from behind of our setup showing the telescopes and the renewable energy table.
TOP: Johan has his audience captivated with his talk in renewable energy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lynnette and Lorenzo on the left with Alan on the right. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan discussing the role of the sun in supplying renewable energy. BOTTOM: Auke in discussion with some visitors interested in renewable energy.
TOP: Johan has his audience captivated with his talk in renewable energy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lynnette and Lorenzo on the left with Alan on the right. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan discussing the role of the sun in supplying renewable energy. BOTTOM: Auke in discussion with some visitors interested in renewable energy.

Our setup this year shared the amphitheater with the impressive DNA model of the Past All from One Exhibition. Please go here to read more about this interesting exhibition sponsored by Standard Bank.

TOP: Alan and Johan in action. The temperature has dropped as you will see by the fact that Johan has put on a jacket. SECOND FROM THE TOP: No sun but Alan still manages to hold his visitor’s attention. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The slightest break in the clouds and Alan is onto the Sun with the Solar Telescope. BOTTOM: All packed up for the day and one last shot showing the Past All From One DNA-model against the backdrop of the impressive building of the Iziko South African Museum.
TOP: Alan and Johan in action. The temperature has dropped as you will see by the fact that Johan has put on a jacket. SECOND FROM THE TOP: No sun but Alan still manages to hold his visitor’s attention. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The slightest break in the clouds and Alan is onto the Sun with the Solar Telescope. BOTTOM: All packed up for the day and one last shot showing the Past All From One DNA-model against the backdrop of the impressive building of the Iziko South African Museum.
TOP: The Solar Cooker. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Rose and Alan in action around the Solar Telescope. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The very impressive model of the eye we used to demonstrate dramatically to children why they should not look directly at the Sun without eye protection. BOTTOM: Lynnette supervising one of the younger visitors at Lorenzo’s eyepiece.
TOP: The Solar Cooker. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Rose and Alan in action around the Solar Telescope. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The very impressive model of the eye we used to demonstrate dramatically to children why they should not look directly at the Sun without eye protection. BOTTOM: Lynnette supervising one of the younger visitors at Lorenzo’s eyepiece.
TOP: Early on Monday morning the N! was relatively unpopulated. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke in discussion with some two early morning visitors on Monday. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan deep in explanations while two other visitors find something worth photographing in our display. BOTTOM: Some visitors enjoying Auke’s animated explanation of renewable energy.
TOP: Early on Monday morning the N! was relatively unpopulated. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke in discussion with some two early morning visitors on Monday. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan deep in explanations while two other visitors find something worth photographing in our display. BOTTOM: Some visitors enjoying Auke’s animated explanation of renewable energy.
TOP: Lynnette and Lorenzo in the background while two other visitors examine some of the handouts. MIDDLE: Hopefully this visitor was phoning friends to come and join in the fun. BOTTOM: A visitor eyeballs the sun through the Solar Telescope under Alan’s watchful eye.
TOP: Lynnette and Lorenzo in the background while two other visitors examine some of the handouts. MIDDLE: Hopefully this visitor was phoning friends to come and join in the fun. BOTTOM: A visitor eyeballs the sun through the Solar Telescope under Alan’s watchful eye.
TOP: Lorenzo is the centre of attraction for this group wanting to see the sun. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke explaining the principle of the solar cooker as he waits for the water to boil so he can make coffee. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan demonstrating the eye model while Lorenzo is the centre of attraction in the background. BOTTOM: Lynnette, Lorenzo and an elderly visitor.
TOP: Lorenzo is the centre of attraction for this group wanting to see the sun. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke explaining the principle of the solar cooker as he waits for the water to boil so he can make coffee. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan demonstrating the eye model while Lorenzo is the centre of attraction in the background. BOTTOM: Lynnette, Lorenzo and an elderly visitor.
TOP: Solar coffee thanks to the solar cooker. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Rassie Erasmus on the right, all the way from Germiston takes a break before embarking on an eight month construction contract in Angola. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Lynnette and Lorenzo in the background. BOTTOM: Alan and the Solar Telescope saw non-stop action throughout National Science Week.
TOP: Solar coffee thanks to the solar cooker. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Rassie Erasmus on the right, all the way from Germiston takes a break before embarking on an eight month construction contract in Angola. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Lynnette and Lorenzo in the background. BOTTOM: Alan and the Solar Telescope saw non-stop action throughout National Science Week.

We had many visitors from overseas and also many visitors from other African countries. Despite the rather nerve racking preparation phase everything actually went off quite well. We definitely had more dubious characters hanging around this year than in 2014. Special thanks to the Iziko security staff who were very efficient and here Benjamin stands out and, quite honestly deserves a medal for his efforts. Despite their surveillance we had items “disappear”, among others Lynnette’s phone and that loss is still having repercussions almost a month later.

TOP: A very quiet N1 early on Tuesday morning because it was a public holiday. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The participants in the National Woman’s Day fun run/walk in central Cape Town make their way through the Company Gardens. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The gent in the grey top and black headgear in the centre might not have been an official entry but he was very excited about his participation. BOTTOM: Some just took the whole thing in their (casual) stride while others were clearly more determined.
TOP: A very quiet N1 early on Tuesday morning because it was a public holiday. SECOND FROM THE TOP: The participants in the National Woman’s Day fun run/walk in central Cape Town make their way through the Company Gardens. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The gent in the grey top and black headgear in the centre might not have been an official entry but he was very excited about his participation. BOTTOM: Some just took the whole thing in their (casual) stride while others were clearly more determined.
TOP: Rose and Lorenzo attending to early visitors. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan hard at work while Rose gets it all down in pictures. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Auke’s first group of visitors interested in renewable energy. BOTTOM: Lynnette helping a budding astronomer take her first look at the sun through Lorenzo.
TOP: Rose and Lorenzo attending to early visitors. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan hard at work while Rose gets it all down in pictures. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Auke’s first group of visitors interested in renewable energy. BOTTOM: Lynnette helping a budding astronomer take her first look at the sun through Lorenzo.
TOP: Auke explains renewable energy while Alan and Lynnette show visitors’ the sun in the background. MIDDLE: The amphitheatre is in front of the Iziko South African Museum is, without doubt a very attractive spot to present National Science Week. BOTTOM: Rose backing up Alan as the visitors queue to look at the sun.
TOP: Auke explains renewable energy while Alan and Lynnette show visitors’ the sun in the background. MIDDLE: The amphitheater is in front of the Iziko South African Museum is, without doubt a very attractive spot to present National Science Week. BOTTOM: Rose backing up Alan as the visitors queue to look at the sun.
TOP: There was a lot of interest in renewable energy and Auke was always on hand to discuss and explain. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lorenzo, Lynnette and a group of younger visitors. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan, the Solar Telescope and one of our striking display posters. BOTTOM: Alan always concerned that visitors should get the best view of the sun.
TOP: There was a lot of interest in renewable energy and Auke was always on hand to discuss and explain. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Lorenzo, Lynnette and a group of younger visitors. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan, the Solar Telescope and one of our striking display posters. BOTTOM: Alan always concerned that visitors should get the best view of the sun.

But, by and large it was a successful week with lots of sunshine making it easy to demonstrate and discuss renewable energy. The solar cooker, solar oven, and various solar power driven devices were all put to good use and other equipment was used to demonstrate the existence of energy at other wavelengths in the solar spectrum. We also used the telescopes equipped with special filters to good effect so that people could take a look at the sun, the source of all this free energy.

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TOP: Auke showing some younger visitors how solar energy can be put to use. SECOND FROM THE TOP: I am in the background with Lorenzo and Auke is up front with some enthusiastic younger visitors. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan on the left with the solar telescope and me in the background on the right with Lorenzo. BOTTOM: Myself, Lorenzo and a group of younger learners with one of their teachers.
TOP: Auke showing some younger visitors how solar energy can be put to use. SECOND FROM THE TOP: I am in the background with Lorenzo and Auke is up front with some enthusiastic younger visitors. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Alan on the left with the solar telescope and me in the background on the right with Lorenzo. BOTTOM: Myself, Lorenzo and a group of younger learners with one of their teachers.
TOP: Adderly Street on the way home. SECOND FROM THE TOP: F.W. de Klerk Boulevard as we queue to get onto the N1 and head home to Brackenfell. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The Tygerberg Hills in the background with the first signs of the Earth’ s shadow and pink colour of Venus’s girdle just above them. BOTTOM: Last lap home with the outline of the Simonsberg, the Bottleray Hills and right in the background the Banhoek mountains.
TOP: Adderly Street on the way home. SECOND FROM THE TOP: F.W. de Klerk Boulevard as we queue to get onto the N1 and head home to Brackenfell. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The Tygerberg Hills in the background with the first signs of the Earth’ s shadow and pink colour of Venus’s girdle just above them. BOTTOM: Last lap home with the outline of the Simonsberg, the Bottleray Hills and right in the background the Banhoek mountains.

Our poster about solar energy depicted the photo-voltaic plant about 6 km outside the town of De Aar in the Northern Cape Province (go here to read more about this development). The other three projects we mentioned and discussed were Concentrating Solar Plants also situated in the Northern Cape Province. !Ka Xu is located about 40 km from the town of Pofadder (go here to read more about this innovative development). Close-by and just off the R358 Onseepkans road lies a similar development Xina (read more about this by going here).. Equally interesting is the !Khi Solar one project which is being constructed close to the town of Upington (go here to read more about this development).

TOP: N1 not to bad considering it was a normal working day. SECOND FROM THE TOP: I get Lorenzo ready and in the background the rest of the team is already in action. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: This enthusiastic group from the Eastern Cape were all ears (and eyes) as Auke explained about renewable energy. BOTTOM: The group waiting for Alan to give them a look through the solar telescope.
TOP: N1 not to bad considering it was a normal working day. SECOND FROM THE TOP: I get Lorenzo ready and in the background the rest of the team is already in action. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: This enthusiastic group from the Eastern Cape were all ears (and eyes) as Auke explained about renewable energy. BOTTOM: The group waiting for Alan to give them a look through the solar telescope.
TOP: Auke’s renewable energy demonstrations drew a lot of attention. MIDDLE: The groups actually became too large to handle comfortably at one stage. BOTTOM: Getting Lorenzo properly aligned so that the visitors could take a peek at the sun.
TOP: Auke’s renewable energy demonstrations drew a lot of attention. MIDDLE: The groups actually became too large to handle comfortably at one stage. BOTTOM: Getting Lorenzo properly aligned so that the visitors could take a peek at the sun.
TOP: Auke’s hat just visible in the background and the lady in the Stetson in the foreground was not from Texas but from Austria. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke is somewhere in the middle of that crowd doing his renewable energy thing. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Lorenzo and I working away the waiting queue of visitors. BOTTOM: A group photo of a section of the much larger group before they departed.
TOP: Auke’s hat just visible in the background and the lady in the Stetson in the foreground was not from Texas but from Austria. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke is somewhere in the middle of that crowd doing his renewable energy thing. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Lorenzo and I working away the waiting queue of visitors. BOTTOM: A group photo of a section of the much larger group before they departed.
TOP: The renewable energy table with Auke in attendance drew lots of attention. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Another (very orderly) group of learners and their teachers. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: A group photo around the National Science Week advertisement. BOTTOM: Alan and the solar telescope in action with some of the younger learners.
TOP: The renewable energy table with Auke in attendance drew lots of attention. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Another (very orderly) group of learners and their teachers. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: A group photo around the National Science Week advertisement. BOTTOM: Alan and the solar telescope in action with some of the younger learners.

Many of the South African visitors were totally oblivious of the efforts currently underway in South Africa to harness wind and solar energy. It is indeed a great pity that the handout material was so totally unrelated to the topic of Renewable Energy because people looked for something tangible to take away with them after visiting us and were noticeably disappointed when they discovered that the handouts were not related to the topic.

TOP: A cold, wet and blustery trip in on the N1. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan’s corner inside the Iziko South African Museum where we took shelter from the rain and wind. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The solar oven and the solar cooker on display. BOTTOM: Alan, Auke and Elsabé who was always there to advise and help.
TOP: A cold, wet and blustery trip in on the N1. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan’s corner inside the Iziko South African Museum where we took shelter from the rain and wind. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: The solar oven and the solar cooker on display. BOTTOM: Alan, Auke and Elsabé who was always there to advise and help.
TOP: Even indoors renewable energy and Auke’s explanations proved very popular. MIDDLE: A lack of sun did not put Alan off in the least. BOTTOM: Auke demonstrating to a small crowd.
TOP: Even indoors renewable energy and Auke’s explanations proved very popular. MIDDLE: A lack of sun did not put Alan off in the least. BOTTOM: Auke demonstrating to a small crowd.
TOP: I had a hard time with this lady who wanted to blow up all nuclear power stations because they were dangerous. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke running through renewable energy for the umpteenth time. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: I explain to this group how a telescope works. BOTTOM: Alan deep in discussion with a visitor whose cloak’s colour rivalled that of the sun in the poster.
TOP: I had a hard time with this lady who wanted to blow up all nuclear power stations because they were dangerous. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Auke running through renewable energy for the umpteenth time. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: I explain to this group how a telescope works. BOTTOM: Alan deep in discussion with a visitor whose cloak’s colour rivaled that of the sun in the poster.
TOP: The younger visitors showed a great deal of interest in Auke’s explanation of renewable energy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: This delightful young lady was not only charming but also very interested and soon had Alan in all sorts of knots around her little finger. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: This group came all the way from Oudtshoorn to visit the Museum and got us and renewable energy as a bonus. BOTTOM: Auke explaining the intricacies of renewable energy.
TOP: The younger visitors showed a great deal of interest in Auke’s explanation of renewable energy. SECOND FROM THE TOP: This delightful young lady was not only charming but also very interested and soon had Alan in all sorts of knots around her little finger. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: This group came all the way from Oudtshoorn to visit the Museum and got us and renewable energy as a bonus. BOTTOM: Auke explaining the intricacies of renewable energy.

The late arrival of the handouts and posters also meant that we had to improvise in order to organize our usual displays at the three largest public in our area. Fortunately some of the librarians were very resourceful and able to contribute very good ideas.

It is also a pity that we did not get to see a member of the official inspectorate as we felt that we had a very good setup. As luck would have it an official photographer did turn up on one of the days when rain had forced us indoors. Our indoor display was not nearly as impressive as the outdoor one and, of course, the photographer turned up when we had a very quiet period and only a trickle of visitors.

TOP: Because the Museum only opened later we could also leave home a bit later and clearly Saturday morning traffic was also less hectic on the N1. MIDDLE: This young lady absolutely insisted on signing her own name on our visitor’s register. BOTTOM: Auke explaining the solar oven and the solar cooker to a visitor.
TOP: Because the Museum only opened later we could also leave home a bit later and clearly Saturday morning traffic was also less hectic on the N1. MIDDLE: This young lady absolutely insisted on signing her own name on our visitor’s register. BOTTOM: Auke explaining the solar oven and the solar cooker to a visitor.
TOP: I get to explain how a telescope works with the able assistance of Lorenzo. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan in action and the fact that we could not see the sun did not affect his enthusiasm at all. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Saturday was very quiet and I only hope the SAASTA/NRF photographer didn’t take photographs during one of these very quiet spells. BOTTOM: Johan at left brought to his knees by renewable energy, Alan in the background hard at work and two visitors actually showing an interest in the handouts.
TOP: I get to explain how a telescope works with the able assistance of Lorenzo. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan in action and the fact that we could not see the sun did not affect his enthusiasm at all. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Saturday was very quiet and I only hope the SAASTA/NRF photographer didn’t take photographs during one of these very quiet spells. BOTTOM: Johan at left brought to his knees by renewable energy, Alan in the background hard at work and two visitors actually showing an interest in the handouts.
TOP: Auke and Johan in the foreground and Alan working away in the far corner. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan enthusiastically explaining the workings of the sun. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Johan busy with an infra-red demonstration. BOTTOM: Johan discusses renewable energy with an interested group.
TOP: Auke and Johan in the foreground and Alan working away in the far corner. SECOND FROM THE TOP: Alan enthusiastically explaining the workings of the sun. SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: Johan busy with an infra-red demonstration. BOTTOM: Johan discusses renewable energy with an interested group.
TOP: The last visitors came past in small groups late on Saturday afternoon. MIDDLE: This charming lady and her husband were very interested in how a telescope works and it is a pity we could not demonstrate it to them outside. BOTTOM: There we all are at the end of a long, tiring but quiet satisfying week.
TOP: The last visitors came past in small groups late on Saturday afternoon. MIDDLE: This charming lady and her husband were very interested in how a telescope works and it is a pity we could not demonstrate it to them outside. BOTTOM: There we all are at the end of a long, tiring but quiet satisfying week.

Our total number of visitors was well over the 4 000 and at the three Libraries we supplied material to, we reached another 12 000 to 15 000. The circulation figure of the newspapers we advertised in was over one and a half million, so the exposure for National Science Week this year, was quite substantial. The NRF/SAASTA should be well satisfied with the number of people reached for the money they spent.

We can only hope that we have very good weather again next year and a smoother, less stressful run-up to the event.

Stargazing at the Pierhead in the V&A Waterfront: Saturday 20th of August 2016.

We had bright sunshine and clear skies which was nice but there were no sunspots and also no moon before almost 21:00. So why on earth did we choose Saturday the 20th to set up in the waterfront?  Actually we didn’t exactly choose it, it was chosen for us by circumstances. Our scheduled date was Saturday the 13th of August but, let me go right back to the beginning and explain what happened.

National Science Week (click here to find out more about the activities presented during National Science Week) was to have taken place from the 30th of July to the 06th of August. StarPeople had been fortunate enough to receive a grant to promote the 2016 theme “Renewable Energy” (Go here or go here) to find out more about renewable energy in South Africa)in the amphitheater in front of the Iziko South African Museum in Cape Town (go here to find out more about this exciting venue). However, the State President announced that the Local Government Elections would be held on the 3rd of August and the NRF/SAASTA promptly moved National Science Week forward to run from the 06th to the 13th of August.

TOP LEFT: The Vito all packed up and ready to go to the Waterfront. TOP CENTER: Heading down the N1 past the Durbanville turnoff. TOP RIGHT: Being Saturday there was no actual work in progress but the lane and speed restrictions remained. MIDDLE: Constantiaberg on the far left and Signal Hill on the far right with a spot of cloud just to the left of Devil’s Peak. BOTTOM LEFT: Down the hill past the Panorama turn-off with Table Bay in the distance. BOTTOM CENTER: The turn-off to Cape Town International Airport coming up and that cloud is still hanging around. BOTTOM RIGHT: Optimistic evaluation of the cloud said it was shrinking and not growing.
TOP LEFT: The Vito all packed up and ready to go to the Waterfront. TOP CENTER: Heading down the N1 past the Durbanville turnoff. TOP RIGHT: Being Saturday there was no actual work in progress but the lane and speed restrictions remained. MIDDLE: Constantiaberg on the far left and Signal Hill on the far right with a spot of cloud just to the left of Devil’s Peak. BOTTOM LEFT: Down the hill past the Panorama turn-off with Table Bay in the distance. BOTTOM CENTER: The turn-off to Cape Town International Airport coming up and that cloud is still hanging around. BOTTOM RIGHT: Optimistic evaluation of the cloud said it was shrinking and not growing.
LEFT: No not a weapon of mass destruction but the Solarscope very generously donated by Mr Jurg Wagener owner of the well known Sterland and Kambrokind in Sutherland. TOP RIGHT: Side view of the Solarscope with useful information on the inner solar system. BOTTOM RIGHT: The other side of the Solarscope with a convenient tool for measuring the altitude of the sun when viewing.
LEFT: No not a weapon of mass destruction but the Solarscope very generously donated by Mr Jurg Wagener owner of the well known Sterland and Kambrokind in Sutherland. TOP RIGHT: Side view of the Solarscope with useful information on the inner solar system. BOTTOM RIGHT: The other side of the Solarscope with a convenient tool for measuring the altitude of the sun when viewing.

We had to decide whether to cancel our Waterfront date on the 13th or to move it one week on. We opted for the latter choice, knowing that the moon would only be out later but still hoping for some sunspots. We didn’t have sunspots, but the change of date wasn’t all negative because the weather was overcast and rainy on the 13th so we would not have been able to set up in the Waterfront in any case.

TOP LEFT: The moment the telescopes appear people start lining up to take look. TOP RIGHT: Auke checking Lorenzo’s sun filter while I explain something to visitors from Stellenbosch. MIDDLE LEFT: Alan and Auke with Brett’s sun telescope and group from the UK. BOTTOM LEFT: Alan sporting his new astronomy hat explaining some astronomy to visitors. I sort of liked his Newlands Cricket headgear more. BOTTOM RIGHT: Dirk looks on looking slightly perplexed at my antics. I also have selective amnesia about exactly what I was up to.
TOP LEFT: The moment the telescopes appear people start lining up to take look. TOP RIGHT: Auke checking Lorenzo’s sun filter while I explain something to visitors from Stellenbosch. MIDDLE LEFT: Alan and Auke with Brett’s sun telescope and group from the UK. BOTTOM LEFT: Alan sporting his new astronomy hat explaining some astronomy to visitors. I sort of liked his Newlands Cricket headgear more. BOTTOM RIGHT: Dirk looks on looking slightly perplexed at my antics. I also have selective amnesia about exactly what I was up to.

So, there we were with no sunspots and a late moon but beautiful weather and lots of enthusiastic people (680 visited us) all eager to get to know more about astronomy.  Auke also had a table set up with some of the material and demonstrations on renewable energy that we had used during National Science Week. This also attracted quite a lot of attention.

TOP LEFT: A closer look at Alan and his new hat. TOP RIGHT: Auke taking a break while contemplating the benefits (if any) of astronomy outreach. BOTTOM LEFT: Dirk and I comparing notes or is Dirk telling another fishy tale. BOTTOM RIGHT: The lady at Alan’s telescope told us that her late father used to haul them out of bed in the dead of night and have them lie on their backs on the lawn to look at the stars. Give that man a Bells!
TOP LEFT: A closer look at Alan and his new hat. TOP RIGHT: Auke taking a break while contemplating the benefits (if any) of astronomy outreach. BOTTOM LEFT: Dirk and I comparing notes or is Dirk telling another fishy tale. BOTTOM RIGHT: The lady at Alan’s telescope told us that her late father used to haul them out of bed in the dead of night and have them lie on their backs on the lawn to look at the stars. Give that man a Bells!

The lack of sunspots gave us the opportunity to talk about other aspects of astronomy and space exploration, after allowing people to view the sun through our specially protected telescopes. Our display about space junk attracted a lot of attention as well. The fact that outer space was a mere 100 km away compared to all the other places on the Pierhead signpost left many of our visitors a bit shell shocked too.

TOP LEFT: The traffic at the telescopes is governed by the Swing Bridge. When it is shut the people waiting at the western end have time to look around and they use that to come over and look through the telescopes. TOP RIGHT: Dirk explain optics to two visitors. MIDDLE LEFT: Two of Dirk’s visitors seem perplexed about something. MIDDLE RIGHT: Alan in full swing, or is it song?. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke explaining renewable energy to two young visitors. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan and Auke explaining why there were no sunspots.
TOP LEFT: The traffic at the telescopes is governed by the Swing Bridge. When it is shut the people waiting at the western end have time to look around and they use that to come over and look through the telescopes. TOP RIGHT: Dirk explain optics to two visitors. MIDDLE LEFT: Two of Dirk’s visitors seem perplexed about something. MIDDLE RIGHT: Alan in full swing, or is it song?. BOTTOM LEFT: Auke explaining renewable energy to two young visitors. BOTTOM RIGHT: Alan and Auke explaining why there were no sunspots.

Dirk was not quite his normal chirpy self and still had a cough and sore ribs after his recent indisposition, so he left pretty sharply at 21:00 to get out of the cold night air. Alan and Rose also opted to get home and get some well earned rest while Auke, Lynnette and I decided to have coffee at Den Anker (click here to find out more about this delightful restaurant), where Patrick was delighted to see Lynnette and I again.

TOP: Just before 21:00 the moon rose over the distant Tygerberg Hills and the much closer harbour cranes. MIDDLE: Auke explaining some finer points to visitors from the safety of his chair. BOTTOM: Looking over to the West one can clearly see the huge amount of light pollution generated by the Waterfront.
TOP: Just before 21:00 the moon rose over the distant Tygerberg Hills and the much closer harbour cranes. MIDDLE: Auke explaining some finer points to visitors from the safety of his chair. BOTTOM: Looking over to the West one can clearly see the huge amount of light pollution generated by the Waterfront.

Also on the positive side I should mention that we had very little dew, so our equipment and other material was put away dry. This meant Lynnette and I could pack everything away without first unpacking all the stuff and laying it out in the sun to dry. What a joy and also a huge saving in time and effort for the two of us.

Our future dates at the Waterfront can all be found by visiting here.